Project Scheduling

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Basic Principles in Project Scheduling. Handouts can be found here: …

Basic Principles in Project Scheduling. Handouts can be found here:
http://corporategeek.info/Project-Planning

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  • Hi Ciprian,



    I checked your website. PDF version is not available over there. Can you send me to my email;

    juahmed@yahoo.com.



    Great presentation.



    Regards,
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  • Hi Ciprian,
    Can you please email me the ppt at the following email address:
    aabhmed@gmail.com.
    Excellent ppt. Thanks
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  • The PDF version of the presentation can be found here:
    http://www.corporategeek.info/Project-Planning
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  • 03/10/09 08:36 2007 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Microsoft, Windows, Windows Vista and other product names are or may be registered trademarks and/or trademarks in the U.S. and/or other countries.The information herein is for informational purposes only and represents the current view of Microsoft Corporation as of the date of this presentation. Because Microsoft must respond to changing market conditions, it should not be interpreted to be a commitment on the part of Microsoft, and Microsoft cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information provided after the date of this presentation. MICROSOFT MAKES NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, AS TO THE INFORMATION IN THIS PRESENTATION.<number>
  • As all Project Managers know, Project planning is the discipline for stating how to complete a project within a certain timeframe, usually with defined stages, and with designated resources.<number>
  • Dwight David \"Ike\" Eisenhower once said “I have always found that plans are useless, but planning is indispensable.” He was the 34th President of the United States from 1953 until 1961 and a five-star general in the United States Army. (Wikipedia).On each project it is crucial for us to do proper planning.<number>
  • Because, above all, It makes you think deeply about your objective, the problems you will encounter and the paths you may take.<number>
  • And it provides other benefits such as:Helps Calculate Project CostsSet realistic expectations (customer & management)Plan & Coordinate resourcesTrack & Report progress<number>
  • How To do Project Planning? Let’s see in these next few slides.<number>
  • Follow this sequence of steps:Review the Project Charter -> Create a WBS & Capture ALL Deliverables -> Define Activities -> Define Sequence of Activities -> Estimate Resources for all Activities -> Estimate Activity Duration -> Develop the Schedule.<number>
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  • Before planning, open the Project Charter and review all its contents.Double check your objectives, the project scope & constraints, and write down your deliverables. Make sure you don’t miss any of them.<number>
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  • I am sure you all know that a Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) in project management is a tool that defines a project and groups the project’s discrete work elements in a way that helps organize and define the total work scope of the project. The Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) is a tree structure, which shows a subdivision of effort required to achieve an objective.By creating the WBS you gain a lot of clarity regarding the deliverables of your project and you have a good basis from which to start creating your plan.<number>
  • When creating the WBS, remember that it is organized around the primary products of the project (or planned outcomes) instead of the work needed to produce the products (planned actions).<number>
  • Don’t forget also the 100% Rule - the WBS includes 100% of the work defined by the project scope and captures all deliverables.<number>
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  • Start with the lowest level of the WBS. Document all activities that are required in order to obtain each sub-deliverable (block in the WBS).<number>
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  • When defining the sequence of activities, ask the following questions:Do I have any times constraints for any of the deliverables?What is the relationship between activities?Which activities can be done in parallel?<number>
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  • When estimating resources, ask the following questions:Which is the sequence?Which are my restrictions (time/cost)?Who do I need for each activity?<number>
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  • When estimating duration, ask the following questions:What is the level of skill of each resource assigned?How much should it take to finalize each activity?<number>
  • Don’t forget plan time buffers at task level.<number>
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  • Now you are ready to create the first version of your Project Plan. When doing it, don’t forget about these tips:Use Microsoft ProjectIdentify Milestones (to highlight state/achievements)Identify the Critical PathOptimize the Critical PathSave Baseline<number>
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  • Follow this sequence of steps:Review the Project Charter -> Create a WBS & Capture ALL Deliverables -> Define Activities -> Define Sequence of Activities -> Estimate Resources for all Activities -> Estimate Activity Duration -> Develop the Schedule.<number>
  • And Remember these tips:Planning is requires team participationAnother implementation of the same product doesn’t mean the same project planPlans always change and reprioritize with situations<number>
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Transcript

  • 1. by Ciprian Rusen
  • 2. “… the discipline for stating how to complete a project within a certain timeframe, usually with defined stages, and with designated resources.”
  • 3. “I have always found that plans are useless, but planning is indispensable.” (Dwight D. Eisenhower, 34th US President )
  • 4. Objective Problems Paths
  • 5. Calculate Cost Set Expectations Plan & Coordinate Track & Report
  • 6. Review the Project Charter Create a WBS & Capture ALL Deliverables Define Activities Define Sequence of Activities Estimate Resources for all Activities Estimate Activity Duration Develop the Schedule
  • 7. Success Deliverables Criteria Constraints Scope Objective
  • 8. Level 1 Software Product Level 2 Analysis Development Conceptual Level 3 Requirements Design Database
  • 9. “WBS is organized around the primary products instead of the work needed to produce the products.”
  • 10. “100% Rule – WBS includes 100 % of the work & deliverables.”
  • 11. Level 3 Database WBS Create Populate Activities Tables Tables
  • 12. Plan time buffers at task level
  • 13. Use Identify Identify the Optimize Save Microsoft Milestones Critical Path Critical Path Baseline Project
  • 14. Review the Project Charter Create a WBS & Capture ALL Deliverables Define Activities Define Sequence of Activities Estimate Resources for all Activities Estimate Activity Duration Develop the Schedule
  • 15. Planning requires team participation Another implementation of the same product doesn’t mean the same project plan Plans always change and reprioritize with situations
  • 16. whatis.com Wikipedia PMBOK, 4th Edition