Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Tutorial 8: Developing an Excel Application

10,713

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
10,713
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
303
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Tutorial 8:Developing an Excel ApplicationMicrosoft Office Excel 2010 ® ®
  • 2. Visual Overview XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 2
  • 3. Excel Application and Defined NamesXPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 3
  • 4. Planning an Excel Application XP • A spreadsheet written or tailored to meet specific needs • The interface helps others use it • Typically includes reports and charts, a data entry area, a custom interface, instructions, and documentationNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 4
  • 5. Naming Cells and Ranges XP • Use a defined name to: – Assign a meaningful, descriptive name to a cell or range – Quickly navigate within a workbook to the cell with the defined name – Create a more descriptive formulaNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 5
  • 6. Creating Defined Names XP • Must begin with a letter or an underscore • Can include letters, numbers, periods and underscores, but not other symbols or spaces • Cannot be a valid cell address, function name, or reserved word • Can include as many as 255 characters – Short, meaningful names (5–15 characters) are more practical • Are not case sensitiveNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 6
  • 7. Creating Defined Names XP • Use the Name box to create defined namesNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 7
  • 8. Creating Defined Names XP • Use the Selection dialog box to create defined names by selectionNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 8
  • 9. Creating Defined Names XP • Use the Name Manager dialog box to edit and delete defined namesNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 9
  • 10. Creating Defined Names XP • Use the Paste Names Command to generate a list of names • Paste defined names in the Documentation worksheet after the workbook is completeNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 10
  • 11. Using Defined Names in FormulasXP • Descriptive formulas are simpler to enter and understand – If a range reference is used rather than a defined name, defined names do not automatically replace the range reference in the formulaNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 11
  • 12. Adding Defined Names to Existing XP Formulas • Defined names are not automatically substituted for cell addresses in a formula • Replace cell addresses in existing formulas with their defined names to make formulas more understandableNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 12
  • 13. Visual Overview XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 13
  • 14. Data Validation and Protection XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 14
  • 15. Validating Data Entry XP • Ensures that correct data is entered and stored in a worksheet – Protects cells with formulas from accidental deletion – Reduces repetitious keystrokes and mouse clicks • Each validation rule defines criteria for data that can be stored in a cell or range • Use Data Validation dialog box to specify validation criteria, input message, and error alert for the active cellNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 15
  • 16. Specifying Validation Criteria XP • When you create a validation rule, specify the type of data allowed as well as a list or range of acceptable values (validation criteria)New Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 16
  • 17. Specifying Validation Criteria XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 17
  • 18. Creating an Input Message XP • Reduces the chance of a data-entry error • Provides additional information about type of data allowed for the cell • Appears as a ScreenTip next to selected cellNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 18
  • 19. Creating an Error Alert Style and XP Message • An error alert determines what happens after a user attempts to make an invalid entry in a cell that has a validation rule defined • Tree error alert styles: Stop, Warning, and InformationNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 19
  • 20. Creating a List Validation Rule XP • Restricts a cell to accept only entries that are on a list you create • Create the list of valid entries in the Data Validation dialog box, or use a list of valid entries in a single column or rowNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 20
  • 21. Protecting a Worksheet and a XP Workbook • Reduces data-entry errors by limiting access to certain parts of the workbook • Prevents users from changing cell contents, workbook organization, or viewing formulasNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 21
  • 22. Locking and Unlocking Cells XP • A cell’s locked property determines whether changes can be made to that cell – Locked property has no impact as long as worksheet is unprotected; after worksheet is protected, locked property is in control – Default: Locked property is turned on for each cell, and worksheet protection is turned off • Common practice: Protect the worksheet, but leave some cells unlockedNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 22
  • 23. Protecting a Worksheet XP • Specify the actions still available to users • A protected worksheet can be unprotected – Require a password to turn off protection only if you are concerned that users might make changesNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 23
  • 24. Protecting a Workbook XP • Keeps a worksheet from being modified – Protecting the structure prohibits renaming, deleting, hiding, or inserting worksheets – Protecting the windows prohibits moving, resizing, closing, or hiding parts of the window • Default: Protect only the structure of the workbook, not the windows used to display itNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 24
  • 25. Unprotecting a Worksheet and a XP Workbook • A worksheet must be unprotected to edit its contents • A workbook must be unprotected to change its structureNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 25
  • 26. Inserting Comments XP • Use comments to: – Explain contents of a particular cell – Provide instructions to users – Share ideas and notes from several users collaborating on a projectNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 26
  • 27. Visual Overview XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 27
  • 28. Working with Macros XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 28
  • 29. Automating Tasks with Macros XP • Macros perform repetitive tasks consistently and faster than you can • After the macro is created and tested, tasks are done exactly the same way each time • Use Developer tab to create and run macrosNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 29
  • 30. Protecting Against Macro Viruses XP • Virus – Computer program designed to copy itself into other programs with the intention of causing mischief or harm • Macro viruses – Type of virus that uses a program’s own macro programming language to distribute the virus • Microsoft Office 2010 provides several options for levels of securityNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 30
  • 31. Macro Security Settings XP • Control what Excel will do about macros when the workbook is openedNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 31
  • 32. Macro Security Settings XP • Set macro security in the Trust Center • Use Trusted Locations to define file paths for files considered trustworthy • Use a digital signature to identify the author of a workbook that contains macrosNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 32
  • 33. Recording a Macro XP • For simple macros, use the macro recorder to record keystrokes and mouse actions as they are performed • For sophisticated macros, enter a series of commands in the Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) programming languageNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 33
  • 34. Running a Macro XP • Either use the specified shortcut key or select the macro in the Macro dialog boxNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 34
  • 35. Options for Fixing Macro Errors XP • Rerecord the macro using the same macro name • Delete the recorded macro; record it again • Run the macro one step at a time to locate the problem; use one of the previous methods to correct the problemNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 35
  • 36. Working with the Visual Basic Editor XP • Components – Code window contains the VBA code – Project Explorer window displays a treelike diagram consisting of every open workbook – Menu bar contains menus of commands used to edit, debug, and run VBA statements • Accessed through Macro dialog box or Visual Basic button in Code group on Developer tabNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 36
  • 37. Working with the Visual Basic Editor XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 37
  • 38. Understanding the Structure of XP Macros • Each macro (sub procedure) begins with Sub followed by the name of the sub procedure and a set of parentheses (the arguments) • Comments about the macro follow the statement and do not include any actions • The body of the macro follows the comments • End Sub statement indicates the end of the sub procedureNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 38
  • 39. Understanding the Structure of XP Macros • A Code window can contain several sub procedures • Each procedure is separated from the others by SubProcedureName() statement at the beginning, and End Sub statement at the end • Sub procedures are organized into modulesNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 39
  • 40. Editing a Macro Using the Visual Basic XP Editor • The Visual Basic Editor provides tools to assist in writing error-free code • As you type a command, the editor provides pop-up windows and text to help you insert the correct codeNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 40
  • 41. Creating Macro Buttons XP • A macro can be assigned to a button placed directly in the worksheet • Clicking a button (with a descriptive label) can be more intuitive and simpler than trying to remember combinations of keystrokes • Form ControlsNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 41
  • 42. Creating Macro Buttons XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 42
  • 43. Saving Workbooks with Macros XP • Default Excel Workbook format is a macro- free workbook (.xlsx file extension) • To save the workbook with the macros, save the file as a macro-enabled workbook (.xlsm file extension)New Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 43
  • 44. Opening a Workbook with Macros XP • First time a workbook opens, a Security Warning appears in Message Bar providing the option to: – Enable macros so they can be run, or – Open the workbook with the macros disabledNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 44
  • 45. Customizing the Ribbon XP • Minimize the Ribbon – Makes more space for a worksheet – Only Quick Access Toolbar and tab names display • Create new tabs and groups • Hide tabs or commands • Rename tabs or commandsNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 45

×