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Tutorial 7: Advanced Functions and Conitional Formating

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  • 1. Tutorial 7:Using Advanced Functions and Conditional Formatting Microsoft Excel 2010 ® ®
  • 2. Visual Overview XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 2
  • 3. Logical Functions XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 3
  • 4. Working with Logical Functions XP • Logical functions (IF, AND, and OR) determine whether a condition is true or false • Conditions use a comparison operator (<, <=, =, <>, >, or >=) to compare two values • Combine two or more functions in one formula to create more complex conditionsNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 4
  • 5. Inserting Calculated Columns in an XP Excel Table • Entering a formula in one cell of a column automatically copies the formula to all cells in that column • To modify the formula in a calculated column: – Edit the formula in any cell in the column – Formulas in all cells in the column are modified • To edit only one cell in a calculated column: – Enter a value or a formula that is different from all others in that columnNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 5
  • 6. Creating Excel Table Fields XP • Create fields that require the least maintenance • Store smallest unit of data possible in a field • Apply a text format to fields with numerical text dataNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 6
  • 7. Using the IF Function XP • A logical function that evaluates a single condition and results in only one value • Returns one value if the condition is true and another value if the condition is false • Syntax:New Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 7
  • 8. Using the IF Function XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 8
  • 9. Using the IF Function XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 9
  • 10. Using the AND Function XP • A logical function that tests two or more conditions (up to 255) and determines whether all conditions are true • Returns the value TRUE if all logical conditions are true and the value FALSE if any or all logical conditions are false • Syntax:New Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 10
  • 11. Using the AND Function XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 11
  • 12. Using the AND Function XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 12
  • 13. Using the AND Function XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 13
  • 14. Using the OR Function XP • A logical function that returns a TRUE value if any of the logical conditions (up to 255) are true and a FALSE value if all the logical conditions are false • Syntax:New Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 14
  • 15. Using the OR Function XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 15
  • 16. Using Structured References to Create XP Formulas in Excel Tables • Replace specific cell or range address with the actual table name or column header – Names or headers are simpler to identify than cell addresses • A formula that includes a structured reference can be fully qualified or unqualifiedNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 16
  • 17. Using Structured References to Create XP Formulas in Excel TablesNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 17
  • 18. Visual Overview XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 18
  • 19. Nested IFs and Lookup Tables XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 19
  • 20. Creating Nested IFs XP • To allow for three or more outcomes • One IF function is placed inside another IF function to test an additional condition • More than one IF function can be nestedNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 20
  • 21. Creating Nested IFs XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 21
  • 22. Creating Nested IFs XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 22
  • 23. Using Lookup Tables and Functions XP • Lookup functions – Allow you to use tables of data to “look up” values and insert them in another worksheet location • Lookup tables – Store data and organize it into categories (compare values) – Can be constructed as either exact match or approximate match lookupsNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 23
  • 24. Using Lookup Tables and Functions XP • Lookup values (value you are trying to find) – Need to match one of the compare values – Can be used as part of a formulaNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 24
  • 25. Using the VLookup Function to Find XP an Exact Match • Searches a lookup table and, based on what you entered, retrieves the appropriate value from that table • Searches vertically down the first column of the lookup table • Syntax:New Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 25
  • 26. Using the VLookup Function to Find XP an Exact MatchNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 26
  • 27. Using the VLOOKUP Function to Find XP an Approximate Match • Returns a value based on an approximate match lookup • Searches the first column of the table until it locates the largest value that is less than the lookup value • Then moves across the row in the table to retrieve the corresponding valueNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 27
  • 28. Using the VLOOKUP Function to Find XP an Approximate MatchNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 28
  • 29. Looking Up Values Using the XP HLOOKUP Function • Searches horizontally across top row of lookup table and retrieves the value in the column you specify • Use when comparison values are located in the first row of the lookup table and you want to look down a specified number of rows to find the data to enter in another cell • Syntax:New Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 29
  • 30. Looking Up Values Using the XP HLOOKUP Function • Major difference between HLOOKUP and VLOOKUP functions is the way lookup tables are organizedNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 30
  • 31. Using the IFERROR Function XP • Error value – Indicates that an element in a formula or a cell referenced in a formula is preventing Excel from returning a calculated value – Begins with a number sign (#) followed by an error name that indicates the type of errorNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 31
  • 32. Excel Error Values XP • Excel error values are not particularly descriptive or helpfulNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 32
  • 33. Using the IFERROR Function XP • Displays a more descriptive message that helps users fix the problem • Can determine if a cell contains an error value and then display the message you choose rather than the default error value • Enables you to easily find and handle formula errors • Syntax:New Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 33
  • 34. Using the IFERROR Function XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 34
  • 35. Visual Overview XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 35
  • 36. Conditional Formatting XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 36
  • 37. Conditional Formatting XP • Changes a cell’s formatting when its contents match a specified condition • Can be used to: – Highlight cells based on their values – Add data bars that graph relative values in a range – Highlight duplicate values in a column of dataNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 37
  • 38. Using the Conditional Formatting XP Rules Manager • A conditional formatting rule specifies: – Type of condition – Type of formatting when that condition occurs – Cell or range the formatting is applied to • Use Conditional Formatting Rules Manager dialog box to edit existing conditional formatting rulesNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 38
  • 39. Using the Conditional Formatting XP Rules ManagerNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 39
  • 40. Using the Conditional Formatting XP Rules ManagerNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 40
  • 41. Using the Conditional Formatting XP Rules ManagerNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 41
  • 42. Summarizing Data Conditionally XP • Use COUNTIF, SUMIF, and AVERAGEIF functions to calculate a conditional count, sum, or average using only cells that meet a particular conditionNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 42
  • 43. Using the COUNTIF Function XP • Calculates the number of cells in a range that match specified criteria • Sometimes referred to as a conditional count • Syntax:New Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 43
  • 44. Using the COUNTIF Function XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 44
  • 45. Using the SUMIF Function XP • Adds values in a range that meet your criteria • Also called a conditional sum • Syntax:New Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 45
  • 46. Using the AVERAGEIF Function XP • Similar to SUMIF function • Calculates the average of values in a range that meet criteria you specify • Syntax:New Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 46
  • 47. Using the AVERAGEIF Function XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 47