Tutorial 7: Advanced Functions and Conitional Formating

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Tutorial 7: Advanced Functions and Conitional Formating

  1. 1. Tutorial 7:Using Advanced Functions and Conditional Formatting Microsoft Excel 2010 ® ®
  2. 2. Visual Overview XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 2
  3. 3. Logical Functions XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 3
  4. 4. Working with Logical Functions XP • Logical functions (IF, AND, and OR) determine whether a condition is true or false • Conditions use a comparison operator (<, <=, =, <>, >, or >=) to compare two values • Combine two or more functions in one formula to create more complex conditionsNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 4
  5. 5. Inserting Calculated Columns in an XP Excel Table • Entering a formula in one cell of a column automatically copies the formula to all cells in that column • To modify the formula in a calculated column: – Edit the formula in any cell in the column – Formulas in all cells in the column are modified • To edit only one cell in a calculated column: – Enter a value or a formula that is different from all others in that columnNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 5
  6. 6. Creating Excel Table Fields XP • Create fields that require the least maintenance • Store smallest unit of data possible in a field • Apply a text format to fields with numerical text dataNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 6
  7. 7. Using the IF Function XP • A logical function that evaluates a single condition and results in only one value • Returns one value if the condition is true and another value if the condition is false • Syntax:New Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 7
  8. 8. Using the IF Function XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 8
  9. 9. Using the IF Function XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 9
  10. 10. Using the AND Function XP • A logical function that tests two or more conditions (up to 255) and determines whether all conditions are true • Returns the value TRUE if all logical conditions are true and the value FALSE if any or all logical conditions are false • Syntax:New Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 10
  11. 11. Using the AND Function XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 11
  12. 12. Using the AND Function XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 12
  13. 13. Using the AND Function XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 13
  14. 14. Using the OR Function XP • A logical function that returns a TRUE value if any of the logical conditions (up to 255) are true and a FALSE value if all the logical conditions are false • Syntax:New Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 14
  15. 15. Using the OR Function XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 15
  16. 16. Using Structured References to Create XP Formulas in Excel Tables • Replace specific cell or range address with the actual table name or column header – Names or headers are simpler to identify than cell addresses • A formula that includes a structured reference can be fully qualified or unqualifiedNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 16
  17. 17. Using Structured References to Create XP Formulas in Excel TablesNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 17
  18. 18. Visual Overview XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 18
  19. 19. Nested IFs and Lookup Tables XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 19
  20. 20. Creating Nested IFs XP • To allow for three or more outcomes • One IF function is placed inside another IF function to test an additional condition • More than one IF function can be nestedNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 20
  21. 21. Creating Nested IFs XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 21
  22. 22. Creating Nested IFs XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 22
  23. 23. Using Lookup Tables and Functions XP • Lookup functions – Allow you to use tables of data to “look up” values and insert them in another worksheet location • Lookup tables – Store data and organize it into categories (compare values) – Can be constructed as either exact match or approximate match lookupsNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 23
  24. 24. Using Lookup Tables and Functions XP • Lookup values (value you are trying to find) – Need to match one of the compare values – Can be used as part of a formulaNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 24
  25. 25. Using the VLookup Function to Find XP an Exact Match • Searches a lookup table and, based on what you entered, retrieves the appropriate value from that table • Searches vertically down the first column of the lookup table • Syntax:New Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 25
  26. 26. Using the VLookup Function to Find XP an Exact MatchNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 26
  27. 27. Using the VLOOKUP Function to Find XP an Approximate Match • Returns a value based on an approximate match lookup • Searches the first column of the table until it locates the largest value that is less than the lookup value • Then moves across the row in the table to retrieve the corresponding valueNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 27
  28. 28. Using the VLOOKUP Function to Find XP an Approximate MatchNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 28
  29. 29. Looking Up Values Using the XP HLOOKUP Function • Searches horizontally across top row of lookup table and retrieves the value in the column you specify • Use when comparison values are located in the first row of the lookup table and you want to look down a specified number of rows to find the data to enter in another cell • Syntax:New Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 29
  30. 30. Looking Up Values Using the XP HLOOKUP Function • Major difference between HLOOKUP and VLOOKUP functions is the way lookup tables are organizedNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 30
  31. 31. Using the IFERROR Function XP • Error value – Indicates that an element in a formula or a cell referenced in a formula is preventing Excel from returning a calculated value – Begins with a number sign (#) followed by an error name that indicates the type of errorNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 31
  32. 32. Excel Error Values XP • Excel error values are not particularly descriptive or helpfulNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 32
  33. 33. Using the IFERROR Function XP • Displays a more descriptive message that helps users fix the problem • Can determine if a cell contains an error value and then display the message you choose rather than the default error value • Enables you to easily find and handle formula errors • Syntax:New Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 33
  34. 34. Using the IFERROR Function XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 34
  35. 35. Visual Overview XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 35
  36. 36. Conditional Formatting XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 36
  37. 37. Conditional Formatting XP • Changes a cell’s formatting when its contents match a specified condition • Can be used to: – Highlight cells based on their values – Add data bars that graph relative values in a range – Highlight duplicate values in a column of dataNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 37
  38. 38. Using the Conditional Formatting XP Rules Manager • A conditional formatting rule specifies: – Type of condition – Type of formatting when that condition occurs – Cell or range the formatting is applied to • Use Conditional Formatting Rules Manager dialog box to edit existing conditional formatting rulesNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 38
  39. 39. Using the Conditional Formatting XP Rules ManagerNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 39
  40. 40. Using the Conditional Formatting XP Rules ManagerNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 40
  41. 41. Using the Conditional Formatting XP Rules ManagerNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 41
  42. 42. Summarizing Data Conditionally XP • Use COUNTIF, SUMIF, and AVERAGEIF functions to calculate a conditional count, sum, or average using only cells that meet a particular conditionNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 42
  43. 43. Using the COUNTIF Function XP • Calculates the number of cells in a range that match specified criteria • Sometimes referred to as a conditional count • Syntax:New Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 43
  44. 44. Using the COUNTIF Function XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 44
  45. 45. Using the SUMIF Function XP • Adds values in a range that meet your criteria • Also called a conditional sum • Syntax:New Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 45
  46. 46. Using the AVERAGEIF Function XP • Similar to SUMIF function • Calculates the average of values in a range that meet criteria you specify • Syntax:New Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 46
  47. 47. Using the AVERAGEIF Function XPNew Perspectives on Microsoft Excel 2010 47

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