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Different Preschool Curricula
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Different Preschool Curricula

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Brief overview of different preschool curricula

Brief overview of different preschool curricula

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    • 1. PreSchool Curricula an overview
    • 2. MontessoriMaria Montessori: firstwoman physician in Italy1907: Casa di Bambini inslums of RomePrepare retarded childrenfor productive work http://www.monroemontessori.com/graphics/dr_maria_montessori_1.jpg
    • 3. MontessoriBased on careful Self-correcting activitiesobservation Mixed-age classroomsEmphasis on practical Emphasis on indoors, smalllearning motor activitiesPrepared child-friendly Solitary learningenvironment No dramatic playSelf-discovery and self-pacing Not trademarked
    • 4. WaldorfRudolf Steiner: scientist andphilosopherAnthroposophy1919: Die FreieWaldorfschule for childrenof cigarette factoryemployees http://www.peopleseconomics.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/Rudolf-Steiner-211x300.jpg
    • 5. WaldorfBased on philosophical Teachers develop groupmodel harmonyEmphasis on natural Extensive use of fantasy,environment dramatic playAdults define daily, No academic learning untilseasonal rhythm milk teeth are lost (around age 7)Unstructured “natural”materials and activities
    • 6. High/ScopeDavid Weikart:psychologist and educator1970: Longitudinal study ofeffects of high-qualitypreschool$15,000 saves $145,000 incosts to schools, welfare,prisons and potential crimevictims http://secure.highscope.org/Content.asp?ContentId=410
    • 7. High/ScopePlan-do-review 15 minutes: children plan what they will do, where they will go, materials they need, who they will be with 45 minutes: children carry out their plan, which includes cleanup 15 minutes: review and recall with adults and other children what they have done
    • 8. Reggio-EmiliaLoris Malaguzzi: teacher1945, Reggio Emilia: U.D.I.(Union of Italian Women)90% of preschool-agedchildren are enrolled inpreschool http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2007/09/23/nyregion/thecity/regg02650.jpg
    • 9. Reggio-EmiliaChild is protagonist Documentation is communication: transcripts,Child is collaborator observations, photographsChild is communicator Parents are partnersEnvironment is third Pedigogista: trains teachersteacher Atelierista: preparesTeacher is partner environmentTeacher is researcher
    • 10. ModelsModel Scales (Model to the Bay) Horizontal: 1 foot = 1000 feet Vertical: 1 foot = 100 feet Velocity: 1 foot/ second =10 feet/second Time1 Minute = 1 Hour 40 Minutes 14.9 Minutes = 1 Lunar Day 7.2 Hours = 30 Lunar Days http://www.spn.usace.army.mil/bmvc/bmjourney/the_model/walk_through/5_image.jpg
    • 11. Developmentally Appropriate Practice Based on universal and predictable age group characteristics and behaviors Reflects uniqueness of each child Sensitive to child’s family culture
    • 12. Developmentally Appropriate Practice Create a caring community of learners Teach to enhance development and learning Plan curriculum to achieve important goals Assess childrens development and learning Establish reciprocal relationships with families
    • 13. Developmentally Appropriate Practice What do you want children to learn? How will children learn this? What are the sensory aspects? What values are you promoting (religious, commercial, diversity, divergent thinking)? How does this curriculum draw on children’s daily lives and experiences?
    • 14. ResourcesBrowne and Gordon. Beginnings and Beyond. Clifton Park, NY: Delmar National Association for the Education of Young Children,Learning. 2004. Developmentally Appropriate Practice. http://www.naeyc.org/dap/coreCook. 2010: Humanity’s Choice as Foreseen by Rudolf Steiner. The People’s North America Montessori Teachers’ Association, http://Economics. http://www.peopleseconomics.com/?p=2328 www.montessori-namta.org/Coulter. Montessori and Steiner: A Pattern of Reverse Symmetries. Montessori North American Reggio Emilia Alliance. http://www.reggioalliance.org/Life. Winter 2003. http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa4097/is_200301/ai_n9199632/?tag=content;col1 ReggioChildren, http://zerosei.comune.re.itDavis. What is Montessori? http://www.monroemontessori.com/content/ The Online Waldorf Library, http://www.waldorflibrary.orgparents/what_is_montessori.html. Association of Waldorf Schools of North America, http://Edwards, Three Approaches from Europe: Waldorf, Montessori, and Reggio www.whywaldorfworks.orgEmilia. Early Childhood Research & Practice. Vol 4, No 1. http://ecrp.uiuc.edu/v4n1/edwards.html Waldorf Early Child Association of North America, http:// www.waldorfearlychildhood.orgHighScope, http://highscope.orgKlein, Different Approaches to Teaching: Comparing Three Preschool Programs.Early Childhood News. http://www.earlychildhoodnews.com/earlychildhood/article_view.aspx?ArticleID=367