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1000 Words - Cindi's Slides
 

1000 Words - Cindi's Slides

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  • Things to know and understand before you shoot
  • The photographic triangle – three measurements that add up to make an exposure. ISO – a measurement of how much light is required to hit the sensor (used to refer to the “speed” of film); ranges from 100 to 1600 or more. Shutter Speed – expressed as a fraction of a second, shutter speed is the amount of time that the shutter is open, allowing light to hit the sensor. Aperture – a measurement of the opening of the lens; a large opening lets in greater amounts of light.
  • The light meter in your camera is your traffic cop. It measures the light coming through the lens and sets the shutter speed and aperture accordingly. YOU set the ISO. (Your camera may vary!)
  • The photographic triangle – three measurements that add up to make an exposure. ISO – a measurement of how much light is required to hit the sensor (used to refer to the “speed” of film); ranges from 100 to 1600 or more. Shutter Speed – expressed as a fraction of a second, shutter speed is the amount of time that the shutter is open, allowing light to hit the sensor. Aperture – a measurement of the opening of the lens; a large opening lets in greater amounts of light.
  • Add shutter speed and aperture here
  • Side-by-side different ISOsShow flash animation?
  • Add shutter speed and aperture here
  • Side-by-side different ISOsShow flash animation?
  • Side-by-side different ISOsShow flash animation?
  • The photographic triangle – three measurements that add up to make an exposure. ISO – a measurement of how much light is required to hit the sensor (used to refer to the “speed” of film); ranges from 100 to 1600 or more. Shutter Speed – expressed as a fraction of a second, shutter speed is the amount of time that the shutter is open, allowing light to hit the sensor. Aperture – a measurement of the opening of the lens; a large opening lets in greater amounts of light.
  • Harvard fountain – 1/2500 sec;
  • Harvard fountain – 1/10 sec;
  • 1/100 sec; f 3.5; ISO 500; 70mm
  • 1/3 second; f 20; ISO 500; 145mm
  • Add shutter speed and aperture here
  • This is the introductory aperture slide
  • Drawing showing different sized circles representing different apertures.Image credit
  • Me shooting Ken – wide apertureAdd animation
  • Me shooting Ken – wide apertureadd animation
  • Some cameras have a depth of field preview so that you can get an idea of where these boundaries are, but my personal experience is that you get a better idea of DOF from looking at the image on your screen rather through the viewfinder. Then again, I’m nearsighted…
  • F2.2 1/1000 sec 85mm
  • F10 1/80 sec 85mm
  • F22 1/13 sec 70mm
  • What RAW is.Shooting RAW allows much more control over the final product than shooting jpeg does. When you shoot jpg, you are relying on the camera’s interpretation of the scene—white balance, color(imetric) interpretation, tone mapping and noise reduction/sharpening. With RAW, the converter that you use to transform the RAW image to a finished image provides all these controls. You can control exposure, contrast, and other settings as well.
  • Color space: SRGB
  • Color space: adobe rgb
  • color-aware browsers: safari screenshot
  • color-aware browsers: ffox screenshot
  • Know what modes doKnow how to change settingsExplore the custom settings menuKnow how auto-focus works, and how to use manual focus
  • The camera’s modes enable you to set which attribute to give weight to. Av – aperture value; Tv = time value (shutter speed); M = manual (set aperture and shutter speed); P = camera sets ap and shutter speed for you.
  • Illustrate point of focus; focus, then recompose
  • Illustrate point of focus; focus, then recompose
  • Illustrate point of focus; focus, then recompose
  • Illustrate point of focus; focus, then recompose
  • We talked about the photographic triangle for proper exposure. The TETRAHEDRON OF INTERDEPENDENCE includes the triangle and a fourth dimension, composition.
  • Rule of thirds. It’s so much easier to get a good shot with the camera than to fix it later in Photoshop or lightroom.
  • Shoot the subject, not the background – eliminate clutter
  • Shoot the subject, not the background – eliminate clutter
  • Shoot the subject, not the background – eliminate clutter
  • Change your angle
  • Look up
  • Look down
  • Get down low
  • Go up high
  • Illlustrate white balance and color temperature
  • Use the available lightPortraits inside: sit subject next to a windowPortraits outside: look for indirect light, put sun behind subjects and use fill flashLandscapes: early morning, late afternoon (long shadows)Indoors: use natural light when possible; watch light balance if depending on artificial light
  • Use the available lightLandscapes: early morning, late afternoon (long shadows)
  • Use the available lightLandscapes: early morning, late afternoon (long shadows)
  • On-camera flash in a darkened room: snapshot
  • Fill flash
  • Off camera, through a snoot
  • Bounced off the backdrop, behind the subject
  • Bounced off the backdrop, behind the subject
  • Alternate sources of light
  • Leave your lens cap off
  • No flash in a room with two windows: portrait
  • Take as many photos as your card will hold – screenshot from at-home iMac Lightroom – small grid display, # of photos
  • Shutter speed should not be lower than focal length for hand-held shots with an SLR: What is important is the angle of view of the lens and the duration ofthe exposure. The rule of thumb is based on an assumption that ahandheld exposure involves movement of the camera at a rate which isindependent of other factors.Thus, as the lens becomes longer, the angle of view becomes smaller, therelative effect of a given amount of movement on the image becomeslarger, and so the duration of the movement needs to be reduced by usinga faster exposure.Or more simply, double the lens length, halve the field of view, doublethe effect of movement, so halve the duration of exposure.http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/t243353-shutter-speed-rule-for-handheld-shots.html
  • Focus about 1/3 of the way into a landscapeFocus on the eyes if taking a portraitUse smaller aperture if taking photos of more than one person
  • Use 85mm+ for portraits. Wide angle distorts featuresUse a vertical or horizontal line in landscapes; get as high as possible when shooting a building to maintain straight perspective
  • Top ten quick ways to improve your shootingWhite balance; ISO; mode; point of focus; shutter speedSet your focus point (focus, recompose)Stop using the flash/use natural lightGet closer to your subjectExperiment with modesRule of thirds
  • Whatever program you choose, you should know how to change temperature, crop, exposure, contrast, dpi; how to export.
  • Picasa (credit: http://benjigarner.deviantart.com/) – desktop app and online albums (sync whole albums with one click)Photoshop.com (Photoshop express 2GB free)
  • Picasa (credit: http://benjigarner.deviantart.com/) – desktop app and online albums (sync whole albums with one click)Photoshop.com (Photoshop express 2GB free)
  • Picasa (credit: http://benjigarner.deviantart.com/) – desktop app and online albums (sync whole albums with one click)Photoshop.com (Photoshop express 2GB free)
  • iPhoto: http://www.apple.com/Iphoto library
  • iPhoto: http://www.apple.com/Iphoto editing
  • iPhoto: http://www.apple.com/
  • iPhoto: http://www.apple.com/Iphoto faces
  • iPhoto: http://www.apple.com/Iphoto faces – guesswork
  • iPhoto: http://www.apple.com/Iphoto faces – sometimes not so good…
  • iPhoto: http://www.apple.com/Iphoto – publish to flickr
  • Photoshop.com
  • Photoshop.com
  • Picnik and facebook
  • Picnik inside flickr
  • Picnik and facebook: I can edit any of my facebook friends’ photos (can I?)
  • RAW image converter (GIMP = Gnu Image Manipulation Program)Icon credit: Gimp: http://benjigarner.deviantart.com/
  • Image as editable in GIMPIcon credit: Gimp: http://benjigarner.deviantart.com/
  • Icon credit: http://leodime.deviantart.com/
  • Icon credit: http://leodime.deviantart.com/
  • Icon credit: http://leodime.deviantart.com/
  • Know your stuff – do a demo of photoshop,lightroom? * whitening teeth * brightening eyes * patches under eyes * softening skin * Photoshop tricks: curves, levels, Gorman BW, actions, scratches/healing brush, selecting with pen
  • * whitening teeth
  • * brightening eyes
  • * patches under eyes
  • * softening skin,
  • Photoshop tricks: curves, levels, Gorman BW, actions, scratches/healing brush, selecting with penClipping:In photography, clipping is the loss image information in a region of a photograph is brighter than what the imaging device can handle or outside the color gamut of the space used to represent the photograph. It is an instance of signal clipping in the image domain. Bright clipped areas are sometimes called "blown-out highlights". With digital cameras, the clipped area will often turn to pure white and will not contain any detail. For example, it is not unusual for a bright sky area to be clipped to white.Clipping can occur in the image sensor, where it is called saturation; or at the analog-to-digital converter (ADC); or in the processing and rendering to a standard color space. Depending on where clipping occurs, and on whether raw data is still available, the clipping may be repairable.
  • * light box approach to narrow * use automatic pre-processing * backup backup backup * did I mention backup?? * stay organized * exportingo printingoflickro web * once more for good measure, BACKUP!The next level: Bridge & Camera RAW or LightRoom (demo?)Management: show collections, filters, flags, ratings, metadata, auto-import and export, auto-backup
  • Books, links,flickr groups
  • Treat your manual like a reference book: use it when you need a particular fact or piece of information rather than reading it cover-to-cover. Great tutorials at camera manufacturers’ websites; photo.net; digital-photography-school; strobist; flickr. And, of course, books. :)
  • Treat your manual like a reference book: use it when you need a particular fact or piece of information rather than reading it cover-to-cover. Great tutorials at camera manufacturers’ websites; photo.net; digital-photography-school; strobist; flickr. And, of course, books. :)
  • Treat your manual like a reference book: use it when you need a particular fact or piece of information rather than reading it cover-to-cover. Great tutorials at camera manufacturers’ websites; photo.net; digital-photography-school; strobist; flickr. And, of course, books. :)
  • Thank you slide

1000 Words - Cindi's Slides 1000 Words - Cindi's Slides Presentation Transcript

  • know
    the process
  • Shutter
    speed
    ISO
    Aperture
  • light meter =
  • ISO
    A
  • ISO
    A
  • ISO 100
    ISO
    A
  • ISO
    A
  • ISO
    A
    ISO 1600
  • ISO 100
    ISO
    A
    ISO 1600
  • Shutter
    speed
  • Shutter
    speed
  • Shutter
    speed
  • Shutter
    speed
  • 1/13 second
  • 1/1000 second
  • 1/1000 second
  • O
    Aperture
  • O
    Aperture
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aperture
  • Not in focus
    O
    In focus
    Aperture
    Widest Aperture = Narrow Depth of Field
  • Foreground and background in focus
    O
    f 22
    Tiny Aperture = Wide Depth of Field
    Aperture
  • subject
    aperture
    sensor
    depth of field
    Image courtesy BernieCode: http://www.berniecode.com/writing/photography/depth-of-field/
  • f2.8
    f22
  • O
    Aperture
    f 2.8
  • O
    Aperture
    f 14
  • O
    Aperture
  • O
    Aperture
  • O
    Aperture
  • know
    your camera
  • a la mode
  • know
    your surroundings
  • Shutter
    speed
    composition
    ISO
    Aperture
  • know
    the light
  • as shot
    shade
    fluorescent
    custom
    daylight
    tungsten
  • know
    the tricks
  • check
    your
    WIMPS
  • know
    the software
  • know
    your stuff
  • know
    your workflow
  • know
    your resources
  • READ
    Understanding Exposure,Bryan Peterson
    The Digital Photography Book (vol 1 & 2),Scott Kelby
    Real World Camera RAW,Bruce Fraser
    The Photoshop CS3 Book for Digital Photographers,Scott Kelby
    Exposure Photo Workshop,Jeff Wignall
    Lighting Photo Workshop,Chris Bucher
    your camera’s manual!