Information Literacy –
The Missing Link
Professor Sheila Corrall
Centre for Information Literacy Research
Department of In...
Overview

Information Literacy – The Missing Link
•  Access to Information
    −  a brief review, before and after the Int...
The Information Problem

   ‘Dealing efficiently with information must now be
   recognised as one of the major problems of
...
Access to Information

Before the Internet – the print-on-paper era
•  People – ask an expert, phone a friend
•  Publicati...
The Information Challenge

   ‘Individuals today have an increasing need to be
   able to find things out. Never before has...
Access to Information

Towards the Web – the end-user revolution
•  Proliferation of home/personal computers
•  Library ca...
Access to Information

The Web – Google and user-created content
•  Electronic delivery becomes the norm
•  Libraries offer...
8/1/09   © The University of Sheffield / Department of Information Studies
8/1/09   © The University of Sheffield / Department of Information Studies
Public domain
The Information Age

Online access – potential benefits
•  Provides faster access to information
•  Facilitates independent...
The Information Age

Online access – evident problems
•  People suffering from information overload
•  Authors having their...
8/1/09   © The University of Sheffield / Department of Information Studies
Information Literacy

   Definition
   ‘Information literacy is knowing when and
   why you need information, where to find ...
Information Literacy

International recognition . . .
•  is a prerequisite for participating effectively in
   the Informat...
Information Literacy

An international recommendation
   ‘Governments should develop strong
   interdisciplinary programs ...
Information Competency

Information Literacy implies the possession
  of several skills and an understanding of
•  the typ...
Information Literacy

Strategies for developing information skills
•  integrate and embed in educational curricula
•  incl...
8/1/09   © The University of Sheffield / Department of Information Studies
8/1/09   © The University of Sheffield / Department of Information Studies
8/1/09   © The University of Sheffield / Department of Information Studies
The HONcode in brief

1.  Authoritative – indicate the qualifications of the authors
2.  Complementarity – support the doct...
8/1/09   © The University of Sheffield / Department of Information Studies
Information Literacy

Developments in the UK
   Librarians and information specialists have been
   actively promoting inf...
8/1/09   © The University of Sheffield / Department of Information Studies
8/1/09   © The University of Sheffield / Department of Information Studies
The UK Skills Problem

•  The UK has never formally recognised the need
   for information literacy and has confused
   in...
Conclusion

•  To survive and thrive in the modern world,
   citizens need competence and confidence in
   finding, appraisi...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Information Literacy - The Missing Link

695 views
625 views

Published on

Presentation by Sheila Corrall to the University of the Third Age (U3A) in Dartmouth on 8 January 2009. Discusses access to information before and after the development of the World Wide Web, identifying benefits and problems arising from Internet use. Explains the need to make Information Literacy a central element of the UK educational curriculum and outlines initiatives taken by library and information professionals to develop an information literate society.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
695
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
5
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
13
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Information Literacy - The Missing Link

  1. 1. Information Literacy – The Missing Link Professor Sheila Corrall Centre for Information Literacy Research Department of Information Studies
  2. 2. Overview Information Literacy – The Missing Link •  Access to Information −  a brief review, before and after the Internet −  potential benefits and evident problems •  Information Literacy −  explaining the concept −  examples of developments •  The UK situation −  the need for action 8/1/09 © The University of Sheffield / Department of Information Studies
  3. 3. The Information Problem ‘Dealing efficiently with information must now be recognised as one of the major problems of modern society…[a learner] must be able to identify his own information needs…know the sources…judge the value…select the limited amount which will serve him best’ Committee of Inquiry into Reading and the Use of English (1975) A Language for Life: Report… London: HMSO. [Bullock Report] 8/1/09 © The University of Sheffield / Department of Information Studies
  4. 4. Access to Information Before the Internet – the print-on-paper era •  People – ask an expert, phone a friend •  Publications – books, magazines, newspapers, etc •  Broadcast media – radio, TV, teletext, viewdata •  Information services – citizens’ advice bureaux, libraries, specialist institutions and organisations •  Computer databases – tools used by specialists with knowledge of complex command languages 8/1/09 © The University of Sheffield / Department of Information Studies
  5. 5. The Information Challenge ‘Individuals today have an increasing need to be able to find things out. Never before has so much information been available to so many, and never before have our lives depended so much on our ability to handle information successfully.’ Marland, M. (ed.) (1981) Information Skills in the Secondary Curriculum. London: Methuen Educational. 8/1/09 © The University of Sheffield / Department of Information Studies
  6. 6. Access to Information Towards the Web – the end-user revolution •  Proliferation of home/personal computers •  Library catalogues move to online public access •  Databases designed for non-specialist users •  Reference works become available on CD-ROMs •  Emergence of early Internet search engines •  Launch of People’s Network for Public Libraries •  Digitisation programmes for heritage materials 8/1/09 © The University of Sheffield / Department of Information Studies
  7. 7. Access to Information The Web – Google and user-created content •  Electronic delivery becomes the norm •  Libraries offer wide range of online services •  Newspapers, broadcasters and others go online •  Organisations and individuals become publishers – via websites, blogs, wikis and social media •  The open access movement promotes free online use of academic research and learning resources 8/1/09 © The University of Sheffield / Department of Information Studies
  8. 8. 8/1/09 © The University of Sheffield / Department of Information Studies
  9. 9. 8/1/09 © The University of Sheffield / Department of Information Studies
  10. 10. Public domain
  11. 11. The Information Age Online access – potential benefits •  Provides faster access to information •  Facilitates independent lifelong learning •  Encourages free flow of information and ideas •  Enables people to make informed choices on issues affecting their health and well-being •  Enhances quality of life for people with limited mobility by helping them to keep in touch 8/1/09 © The University of Sheffield / Department of Information Studies
  12. 12. The Information Age Online access – evident problems •  People suffering from information overload •  Authors having their work copied or plagiarised •  Internet users being exposed to misleading, erroneous, offensive or obscene content •  Users ignoring information not readily available •  Internet non-users becoming progressively disadvantaged by the digital information divide 8/1/09 © The University of Sheffield / Department of Information Studies
  13. 13. 8/1/09 © The University of Sheffield / Department of Information Studies
  14. 14. Information Literacy Definition ‘Information literacy is knowing when and why you need information, where to find it and how to evaluate, use and communicate it in an ethical manner.’ Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals, 2004 8/1/09 © The University of Sheffield / Department of Information Studies
  15. 15. Information Literacy International recognition . . . •  is a prerequisite for participating effectively in the Information Society and part of the basic human right of life long learning •  plays a leading role in reducing inequities and promoting tolerance and mutual understanding •  is a concern to all sectors of society UNESCO Prague Declaration, 2003 8/1/09 © The University of Sheffield / Department of Information Studies
  16. 16. Information Literacy An international recommendation ‘Governments should develop strong interdisciplinary programs to promote Information Literacy nationwide as a necessary step in closing the digital divide through the creation of an information literate citizenry, an effective civil society and a competitive workforce.’ UNESCO Prague Declaration, 2003 8/1/09 © The University of Sheffield / Department of Information Studies
  17. 17. Information Competency Information Literacy implies the possession of several skills and an understanding of •  the types and sources of information available •  methods and techniques for finding information •  the need to assess the quality of information •  ways of working with or exploiting information, including the rights and responsibilities associated with information use 8/1/09 © The University of Sheffield / Department of Information Studies
  18. 18. Information Literacy Strategies for developing information skills •  integrate and embed in educational curricula •  include in workplace training programmes •  provide self-paced online learning resources •  deliver via public library and information services −  instructions and help-sheets for databases users −  individual guidance in response to enquiries −  workshops for family history researchers 8/1/09 © The University of Sheffield / Department of Information Studies
  19. 19. 8/1/09 © The University of Sheffield / Department of Information Studies
  20. 20. 8/1/09 © The University of Sheffield / Department of Information Studies
  21. 21. 8/1/09 © The University of Sheffield / Department of Information Studies
  22. 22. The HONcode in brief 1.  Authoritative – indicate the qualifications of the authors 2.  Complementarity – support the doctor-patient relationship 3.  Privacy – respect the confidentiality of personal data submitted 4.  Attribution – cite the source(s) and date of published information 5.  Justifiability – back up claims relating to benefits and performance 6.  Transparency – accessible presentation, accurate email contact 7.  Financial disclosure – identify funding sources 8.  Advertising policy – distinguish advertising from editorial content www.hon.ch/HONcode/Conduct.html 8/1/09 © The University of Sheffield / Department of Information Studies
  23. 23. 8/1/09 © The University of Sheffield / Department of Information Studies
  24. 24. Information Literacy Developments in the UK Librarians and information specialists have been actively promoting information literacy in education, the workplace and society −  school librarians working with teachers to integrate information skills teaching in educational curricula −  academic librarians working with lecturers to embed information literacy in further and higher education −  law librarians working with practice lawyers to provide information skills training to trainee solicitors 8/1/09 © The University of Sheffield / Department of Information Studies
  25. 25. 8/1/09 © The University of Sheffield / Department of Information Studies
  26. 26. 8/1/09 © The University of Sheffield / Department of Information Studies
  27. 27. The UK Skills Problem •  The UK has never formally recognised the need for information literacy and has confused information skills with IT skills −  National Key Skills Framework includes elements of information literacy in specifications for IT skills −  Framework of Personal Learning and Thinking Skills includes ‘analyse and evaluate information, judging its relevance and value’ as one component among the several specified for Independent Enquirers •  The US and Australia specified information skills as a key area of competency in the 1990s 8/1/09 © The University of Sheffield / Department of Information Studies
  28. 28. Conclusion •  To survive and thrive in the modern world, citizens need competence and confidence in finding, appraising and using information •  The Internet and World Wide Web have both helped and hindered access to information •  People often do not recognise the need for Information Literacy and frequently confuse information skills with ICT/computer skills •  We need to raise awareness and promote the development of an Information Literate Society 8/1/09 © The University of Sheffield / Department of Information Studies

×