MINISTRY OF EDUCATION MALAYSIAIntegrated Curriculum for Primary Schools           Curriculum Specifications              M...
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION MALAYSIAIntegrated Curriculum for Primary Schools           Curriculum Specifications              M...
Copyright (C) 2003 Curriculum Development CentreMinistry of Education MalaysiaPesiaran Duta Off Jalan Duta50604 Kuala Lump...
CONTENTSRUKUNEGARA                                                        vNATIONAL PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION               ...
LENGTH             Measuring and Comparing Lengths                 37                   Relationship between Units of Leng...
RUKUNEGARA                                   DECLARATIONOUR NATION, MALAYSIA, being dedicatedto achieving a greater unity ...
NATIONAL PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATIONEducation in Malaysia is an on-going effort towards developing the potential ofindividuals...
PREFACEScience and technology plays a crucial role in           greater opportunities for pupils to enhancemeeting Malaysi...
INTRODUCTIONOur nation’s vision can be achieved through a society         later in life and in the process, benefit the so...
AIMThe Primary School Mathematics Curriculum aims               4.   master basic mathematical skills, namely:to build pup...
CONTENT ORGANISATIONThe Mathematics Curriculum at the primary level            4.   Statisticsencompasses four main areas,...
The Learning Objectives define clearly what should        The Vocabulary column consists of standardbe taught. They cover ...
EMPHASIS IN TEACHING AND LEARNING                           1.       Problem Solving in MathematicsThe Mathematics Curricu...
•   Trying a simple case;                             and concise mathematical terms during oral     •   Trial and improve...
•   Stimulating meta-cognitive skills;                    Written communication is the process whereby    •   Inculcating ...
3.   Mathematical Reasoning                                 The mathematics curriculum consists of several                ...
The use of teaching resources is very important in        attitudes and personalities, the intrinsic mathematicalmathemati...
The choice of an approach that is suitable will stimulatethe teaching and learning environment in the classroomor outside ...
Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: NUMBERS TO 10 000  LEARNING OBJECTIVES           SUGGESTED TEACHING AND          ...
Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: NUMBERS TO 10 000  LEARNING OBJECTIVES           SUGGESTED TEACHING AND          ...
Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: NUMBERS TO 10 000  LEARNING OBJECTIVES           SUGGESTED TEACHING AND          ...
Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: NUMBERS TO 10 000  LEARNING OBJECTIVES           SUGGESTED TEACHING AND          ...
Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: NUMBERS TO 10 000  LEARNING OBJECTIVES           SUGGESTED TEACHING AND          ...
Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: NUMBERS TO 10 000  LEARNING OBJECTIVES             SUGGESTED TEACHING AND        ...
Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: ADDITION WITH THE HIGHEST TOTAL OF 10 000  LEARNING OBJECTIVES           SUGGESTE...
Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: ADDITION WITH THE HIGHEST TOTAL OF 10 000 LEARNING OBJECTIVES            SUGGESTE...
Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: SUBTRACTION WITHIN THE RANGE OF 10 000  LEARNING OBJECTIVES           SUGGESTED T...
Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: SUBTRACTION WITHIN THE RANGE OF 10 000  LEARNING OBJECTIVES         SUGGESTED TEA...
Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: SUBTRACTION WITHIN THE RANGE OF 10 000  LEARNING OBJECTIVES              SUGGESTE...
Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: MULTIPLICATION WITHIN 6, 7, 8 AND 9 TIMES-TABLES  LEARNING OBJECTIVES           S...
Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: MULTIPLICATION WITHIN 6, 7, 8 AND 9 TIMES-TABLES  LEARNING OBJECTIVES           S...
Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: MULTIPLICATION WITHIN 6, 7, 8 AND 9 TIMES-TABLES  LEARNING OBJECTIVES           S...
Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: MULTIPLICATION WITHIN 6, 7, 8 AND 9 TIMES-TABLES  LEARNING OBJECTIVES           S...
Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: MULTIPLICATION WITH THE HIGHEST PRODUCT OF 1000  LEARNING OBJECTIVES           SU...
Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: MULTIPLICATION WITH THE HIGHEST PRODUCT OF 1000  LEARNING OBJECTIVES           SU...
Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: DIVISION WITHIN 6, 7, 8 AND 9 TIMES-TABLES  LEARNING OBJECTIVES        SUGGESTED ...
Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: DIVISION WITHIN 6, 7, 8 AND 9 TIMES-TABLES  LEARNING OBJECTIVES           SUGGEST...
Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: DIVISION WITHIN 6, 7, 8 AND 9 TIMES-TABLES  LEARNING OBJECTIVES          SUGGESTE...
Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: DIVISION WITHIN 6, 7, 8 AND 9 TIMES-TABLES  LEARNING OBJECTIVES           SUGGEST...
Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: DIVISION WITH THE HIGHEST DIVIDEND OF 1000  LEARNING OBJECTIVES           SUGGEST...
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MATHEMATICS YEAR 3

  1. 1. MINISTRY OF EDUCATION MALAYSIAIntegrated Curriculum for Primary Schools Curriculum Specifications MATHEMATICS YEAR 3 Curriculum Development Centre Ministry of Education Malaysia 2003
  2. 2. MINISTRY OF EDUCATION MALAYSIAIntegrated Curriculum for Primary Schools Curriculum Specifications MATHEMATICS YEAR 3 Curriculum Development Centre Ministry of Education Malaysia 2003
  3. 3. Copyright (C) 2003 Curriculum Development CentreMinistry of Education MalaysiaPesiaran Duta Off Jalan Duta50604 Kuala LumpurFirst published 2003Copyright reserved. Except for use in a review, thereproduction or utilisation of this work in any form or by anyelectronic, mechanical, or other means, now known or hereafterinvented, including photocopying, and recording is forbiddenwithout the prior written permission from the Director of theCurriculum Development Centre, Ministry of Education Malaysia.
  4. 4. CONTENTSRUKUNEGARA vNATIONAL PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION viiPREFACE ixINTRODUCTION xiWHOLE NUMBERS Numbers to 10 000 1 Addition with the Highest Total of 10 000 7 Subtraction within the Range of 10 000 9 Multiplication within 6, 7, 8 and 9 Times-tables 12 Multiplication with the Highest Product of 1000 16 Division within 6, 7, 8 and 9 Times-tables 18 Division with the Highest Dividend of 1000 22FRACTIONS Introduction to Fractions 24MONEY Money to RM100 25TIME Reading and Writing Time 30 Relationship between Units of Time 33 Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication and 34 Division involving Time Solving Problems involving Time 36 iii
  5. 5. LENGTH Measuring and Comparing Lengths 37 Relationship between Units of Lengths 39 Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication and 40 Division involving Length Solving Problems involving Length 42MASS Measuring and Comparing Masses 43 Relationship between Units of Lengths 45 Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication and 46 Division involving Mass Solving Problems involving Mass 48VOLUME OF LIQUID Measuring and Comparing Volumes of Liquids 49 Relationship between Units of Lengths 53 Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication and 54 Division involving Volumes of Liquids Solving Problems involving Volumes of Liquids 56SHAPE AND SPACE Three-Dimensional Shapes 57 Two-Dimensional Shapes 60 Symmetry 62DATA HANDLING Collecting and Organising Data 63CONTRIBUTORS 65PANEL OF WRITERS 66 iv
  6. 6. RUKUNEGARA DECLARATIONOUR NATION, MALAYSIA, being dedicatedto achieving a greater unity of all her peoples;to maintaining a democratic way of life;to creating a just society in which the wealth of the nation shall be equitably shared;to ensuring a liberal approach to her rich and diverse cultural traditions;to building a progressive society which shall be orientated to modern science and technology;WE, her peoples, pledge our united efforts to attain these ends guided by these principles:Belief in GodLoyalty to King and CountryUpholding the ConstitutionRule of LawGood Behaviour and Morality v
  7. 7. NATIONAL PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATIONEducation in Malaysia is an on-going effort towards developing the potential ofindividuals in a holistic and integrated manner, so as to produce individuals whoare intellectually, spiritually, emotionally and physically balanced and harmoniousbased on a firm belief in and devotion to God. Such an effort is designed to produceMalaysian citizens who are knowledgeable and competent, who possess highmoral standards and who are responsible and capable of achieving a high level ofpersonal well being as well as being able to contribute to the harmony andbetterment of the family, society and the nation at large. vii
  8. 8. PREFACEScience and technology plays a crucial role in greater opportunities for pupils to enhancemeeting Malaysia’s aspiration to achieve developed their knowledge and skills because they are able tonation status. Since mathematics is instrumental in source the various repositories of knowledge written indeveloping scientific and technological knowledge, the mathematical English whether in electronic or printprovision of quality mathematics education from an forms. Pupils will be able to communicateearly age in the education process is critical. mathematically in English not only in the immediate enviroment but also with pupils from other countriesThe primary school Mathematics curriculum as thus increasing their overall English proficiency andoutlined in the syllabus has been designed to provide mathematical competence in the process.opportunities for pupils to acquire mathematicalknowledge and skills and develop the higher order The development of a set of Curriculum Specificationsproblem solving and decision making skills that they as a supporting document to the syllabus is the workcan apply in their everyday lives. But, more of many individuals and experts in the field. To thoseimportantly, together with the other subjects in the who have contributed in one way or another to thisprimary school curriculum, the mathematics effort, on behalf of the Ministry of Education, I wouldcurriculum seeks to inculcate noble values and love like to thank them and express my deepestfor the nation towards the final aim of developing the appreciation.holistic person who is capable of contributing to theharmony and prosperity of the nation and its people.Beginning in 2003, science and mathematics will betaught in English following a phased implementationschedule, which will be completed by 2008. (Dr. SHARIFAH MAIMUNAH SYED ZIN)Mathematics education in English makes use of DirectorICT in its delivery. Studying mathematics in the Curriculum Development Centremedium of English assisted by ICT will provide Ministry of Education Malaysia ix
  9. 9. INTRODUCTIONOur nation’s vision can be achieved through a society later in life and in the process, benefit the society andthat is educated and competent in the application of the nation.mathematical knowledge. To achieve this vision,society must be inclined towards mathematics. Several factors have been taken into account when designing the curriculum and these are: mathematicalTherefore, problem solving and communicational skillsin mathematics have to be nurtured so that decisions concepts and skills, terminology and vocabulary used,can be made effectively. and the level of proficiency of English among teachers and pupils.Mathematics is integral in the development of science The Mathematics Curriculum at the primary leveland technology. As such, the acquisition of (KBSR) emphasises the acquisition of basic conceptsmathematical knowledge must be upgradedperiodically to create a skilled workforce in preparing and skills. The content is categorised into four interrelated areas, namely, Numbers, Measurement,the country to become a developed nation. In order tocreate a K-based economy, research and development Shape and Space and Statistics.skills in Mathematics must be taught and instilled at The learning of mathematics at all levels involves moreschool level. than just the basic acquisition of concepts and skills. It involves, more importantly, an understanding of theAchieving this requires a sound mathematics underlying mathematical thinking, general strategies ofcurriculum, competent and knowledgeable teacherswho can integrate instruction with assessment, problem solving, communicating mathematically and inculcating positive attitudes towards an appreciationclassrooms with ready access to technology, and acommitment to both equity and excellence. of mathematics as an important and powerful tool in everyday life.The Mathematics Curriculum has been designed to It is hoped that with the knowledge and skills acquiredprovide knowledge and mathematical skills to pupils in Mathematics, pupils will discover, adapt, modify andfrom various backgrounds and levels of ability. be innovative in facing changes and future challenges.Acquisition of these skills will help them in their careers xi
  10. 10. AIMThe Primary School Mathematics Curriculum aims 4. master basic mathematical skills, namely:to build pupils’ understanding of number concepts • making estimates and approximates,and their basic skills in computation that they can • measuring,apply in their daily routines effectively and responsibly • handling datain keeping with the aspirations of a developed society • representing information in the formand nation, and at the same time to use this of graphs and charts;knowledge to further their studies. 5. use mathematical skills and knowledge toOBJECTIVES solve problems in everyday life effectively and responsibly;The Primary School Mathematics Curriculum willenable pupils to: 6. use the language of mathematics correctly; 1. know and understand the concepts, 7. use suitable technology in concept building, definition, rules sand principles related to acquiring mathematical skills and solving numbers, operations, space, measures and problems; data representation; 8. apply the knowledge of mathematics 2. master the basic operations of mathematics: systematically, heuristically, accurately and • addition, carefully; • subtraction, • multiplication, 9. participate in activities related to mathematics; • division; and 3. master the skills of combined operations; 10. appreciate the importance and beauty of mathematics. xii
  11. 11. CONTENT ORGANISATIONThe Mathematics Curriculum at the primary level 4. Statisticsencompasses four main areas, namely, Numbers, • Average;Measures, Shape and Space and Statistics. The • Data Representation.topics for each area have been arranged from thebasic to the abstract. Teachers need to teach the The Learning Areas outline the breadth and depth ofbasics before abstract topics are introduced to pupils. the scope of knowledge and skills that have to beEach main area is divided into topics as follows: mastered during the allocated time for learning. These learning areas are, in turn, broken down into more1. Num b r es manageable objectives. Details as to teaching-learning • Whole Numbers; strategies, vocabulary to be used and points to note • Fractions; are set out in five columns as follows: • Decimals; • Money; Column 1: Learning Objectives. • Percentage. Column 2: Suggested Teaching and2. Measures Learning Activities. • Time; Column 3: Learning Outcomes. • Length; Column 4: Points To Note. • Mass; Column 5: Vocabulary. • Volume of Liquid. The purpose of these columns is to illustrate, for a3. Shape and Space particular teaching objective, a list of what pupils • Two-dimensional Shapes; should know, understand and be able to do by the • Three-dimensional Shapes. end of each respective topic. xiii
  12. 12. The Learning Objectives define clearly what should The Vocabulary column consists of standardbe taught. They cover all aspects of the Mathematics mathematical terms, instructional words and phrasescurriculum and are presented in a developmental that are relevant when structuring activities, askingsequence to enable pupils to grasp concepts and questions and in setting tasks. It is important to paymaster skills essential to a basic understanding of careful attention to the use of correct terminology.mathematics. These terms need to be introduced systematically to pupils and in various contexts so that pupils get to knowThe Suggested Teaching and Learning Activities of their meaning and learn how to uselist some examples of teaching and learning activities. them appropriately.These include methods, techniques, strategies andresources useful in the teaching of a specificconcepts and skills. These are however not the onlyapproaches to be used in classrooms.The Learning Outcomes define specifically whatpupils should be able to do. They prescribe theknowledge, skills or mathematical processes andvalues that should be inculcated and developed atthe appropriate levels. These behavioural objectivesare measurable in all aspects.In Points To Note, attention is drawn to the moresignificant aspects of mathematical concepts andskills. These aspects must be taken into accountsso as to ensure that the concepts and skills are taughtand learnt effectively as intended. xiv
  13. 13. EMPHASIS IN TEACHING AND LEARNING 1. Problem Solving in MathematicsThe Mathematics Curriculum is ordered in such a way Problem solving is the main focus in the teaching andso as to give flexibility to the teachers to create an learning of mathematics. Understanding mathematicalenvironment that is enjoyable, meaningful, useful and procedures and solving problemschallenging for teaching and learning. At the same time are two skills that emerge naturally when relationalit is important to ensure that pupils show progression understanding is focussed upon. As a result, problemin acquiring the mathematical concepts and skills. solving approaches should be used to investigate and understand mathematical content. The teaching-On completion of a certain topic and in deciding to learning process must include exercises on problemprogress to another learning area or topic, the following solving skills which are comprehensive and cover theneed to be taken into accounts: whole curriculum. The development of these skills • The skills or concepts acquired in the new must to be emphasised so that pupils are able to solve learning area or topics; various problems effectively. The skills • Ensuring that the hierarchy or relationship involved are: between learning areas or topics have been followed through accordingly; and • Interpreting problems; • Ensuring the basic learning areas have or • Planning the strategy; skills have been acquired or mastered before • Carrying out the strategy; and progressing to the more abstract areas. • Looking back at the solutions.The teaching and learning processes emphasise Various strategies and steps are used to solve problems and these can be applied to other learningconcept building, skill acquisition as well as theinculcation of positive values. Besides these, there areas. In solving these problems, pupils learn to apply mathematics and gradually become confident in facingare other elements that need to be taken into accountand learnt through the teaching and learning new challenging situations. Among the problem solvingprocesses in the classroom. The main emphasis are strategies to consider are:as follows: xv
  14. 14. • Trying a simple case; and concise mathematical terms during oral • Trial and improvement; presentation and written work. This is also expanded • Draw a diagram; to the listening skills involved. • Identifying patterns and sequences; Communication in mathematics through the listening • Make a table, chart or a systematic list; process occurs when individuals respond to what • Simulation; they hear and this encourages them to think using • Make analogy; and their mathematical knowledge in making decisions. • Working backwards. Communication in mathematics through the reading2. Communication in Mathematics process takes place when an individual collects information or data and rearranges the relationshipCommunication is one way to share ideas and clarify between ideas and concepts.the understanding of Mathematics. Through talkingand questioning, mathematical ideas can be reflected Communication in mathematics through theupon, discussed and modified. The process of visualization process takes place when an individualreasoning analytically and systematically can help makes observation, analyses it, interprets andreinforce and strengthen pupils’ knowledge and synthesises the data into graphic forms, such asunderstanding of mathematics to a deeper level. pictures, diagrams, tables and graphs.Through effective communications pupils will becomeefficient in problem solving and be able to explain The following methods can create an effectiveconcepts and mathematical skills to their peers and communication environment:teachers. • Identifying relevant contexts associatedPupils who have developed the above skills will with environment and everyday lifebecome more inquisitive gaining confidence in the experiences of pupils;process. Communicational skills in mathematics • Identifying interests of pupils;include reading and understanding problems, • Identifying teaching materials;interpreting diagrams and graphs, and using correct • Ensuring active learning; xvi
  15. 15. • Stimulating meta-cognitive skills; Written communication is the process whereby • Inculcating positive attitudes; and mathematical ideas and information are • Creating a conducive learning environment. shared with others through writing. The written work is usually the result of discussions, contributions andOral communication is an interactive process that brain-storming activities when working oninvolves activities like listening, speaking, reading and assignments. Through writing, the pupils will beobserving. It is a two-way interaction that takes place encouraged to think more deeply about thebetween teacher-pupil, pupil-pupil, and pupil-object. mathematics content and observe the relationshipsWhen pupils are challenged to think and reason about between concepts.mathematics and to tell others the results of theirthinking, they learn to be clear and convincing. Listening Examples of written communication activities are:to others’ explanations gives pupils the opportunities • Doing exercises;to develop their own understanding. Conversations in • Keeping scrap books;which mathematical ideas are explored from multiple • Keeping folios;perspectives help sharpen pupils thinking and help • Undertaking projects; andmake connections between ideas. Such activity helps • Doing written tests.pupils develop a language for expressing mathematicalideas and appreciation of the need for precision in thelanguage. Some effective and meaningful oral Representation is a process of analysing acommunication techniques in mathematics are as mathematical problem and interpreting it from onefollows: mode to another. Mathematical representation enables pupils to find relationship between mathematical ideas • Story-telling, question and answer sessions that are informal, intuitive and abstract using their using own words; everyday language. Pupils will realise that some • Asking and answering questions; methods of representation are more effective and • Structured and unstructure interviews; useful if they know how to use the elements of • Discussions during forums, seminars mathematical representation. debates and brain-storming sessions; and • Presentation of findings of assignments. xvii
  16. 16. 3. Mathematical Reasoning The mathematics curriculum consists of several areas such as arithmetic, geometry, measures andLogical reasoning or thinking is the basis for problem solving. Without connections between theseunderstanding and solving mathematical problems. areas, pupils will have to learn and memorise too manyThe development of mathematical reasoning is closely concepts and skills separately. By making connectionsrelated to the intellectual and communicative pupils are able to see mathematics as an integrateddevelopment of the pupils. Emphasis on logical whole rather than a jumble of unconnected ideas.thinking during mathematical activities opens up pupils’ Teachers can foster connections in a problem-orientedminds to accept mathematics as a powerful tool in classrooms by having pupils to communicate, reasonthe world today. and present their thinking. When these mathematical ideas are connected with real life situations and thePupils are encouraged to predict and do guess work curriculum, pupils will become more conscious in thein the process of seeking solutions. Pupils at all application of mathematics. They will also be able tolevels have to be trained to investigate their use mathematics contextually in different learningpredictions or guesses by using concrete areas in real life.materials, calculators, computers, mathematicalrepresentation and others. Logical reasoning has tobe infused in the teaching of mathematics so that 5. Application of Technologypupils can recognise, construct and evaluatepredictions and mathematical arguments. The application of technology helps pupils to understand mathematical concepts in depth,4. Mathematical Connections meaningfully and precisely enabling them to explore mathematical concepts. The use of calculators,In the mathematics curriculum, opportunities for computers, educational software, websites in themaking connections must be created so that pupils internet and available learning packages can help tocan link conceptual to procedural knowledge and upgrade the pedagogical skills in the teaching andrelate topics in mathematics with other learning learning of mathematics.areas in general. xviii
  17. 17. The use of teaching resources is very important in attitudes and personalities, the intrinsic mathematicalmathematics. This will ensure that pupils absorb values of exactness, confidence and thinkingabstract ideas, be creative, feel confident and be able systematically have to be absorbed through theto work independently or in groups. Most of these learning areas.resources are designed for self-access learning.Through self-access learning, pupils will be able to Good moral values can be cultivated through suitableaccess knowledge or skills and informations context. For example, learning in groups can helpindependently according to their pace. This will serve pupils develop social skills and encourage cooperationto stimulate pupils’ interests and responsibility in and self-confidence in the subject. The element oflearning mathematics. patriotism can also be inculcated through the teaching- learning process in the classroom using planned topics. These values should be imbibed throughoutAPPROACHES IN TEACHING AND LEARNING the process of teaching and learning mathematics.Various changes occur that influence the content and Among the approaches that can be given considerationpedagogy in the teaching of mathematics in primary are:schools. These changes require variety in the way ofteaching mathematics in schools. The use of teaching • Pupil centered learning that is interesting;resources is vital in forming mathematical concepts. • The learning ability and styles of learning;Teachers can use real or concrete objects in teaching • The use of relevant, suitable and effectiveand learning to help pupils gain experience, construct teaching materials; andabstract ideas, make inventions, build self confidence, • Formative evaluation to determine theencourage independence and inculcate cooperation. effectiveness of teaching and learning.The teaching and learning materials that are usedshould contain self-diagnostic elements so that pupilscan know how far they have understood the conceptsand skills. To assist the pupils in having positive xix
  18. 18. The choice of an approach that is suitable will stimulatethe teaching and learning environment in the classroomor outside it. The approaches that are suitable includethe following: • Cooperative learning; • Contextual learning; • Mastery learning; • Constructivism; • Enquiry-discovery; and • Futures Study.ASSESSMENTAssessment is an integral part of the teaching and learningprocess. It has to be well-structured and carried outcontinuously as part of the classroom activities. Byfocusing on a broad range of mathematical tasks, thestrengths and weaknesses of pupils can be assessed.Different methods of assessment can be conducted usingmultiple assessment techniques, including written andoral work as well as demonstration. These may be inthe form of interviews, open-ended questions,observations and assignments. Based on the results,the teachers can rectify the pupils’ misconceptions andweaknesses and at the same time improve their teachingskills. As such, teachers can take subsequent effectivemeasures in conducting remedial and enrichmentactivities to upgrade pupils’ performance. xx
  19. 19. Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: NUMBERS TO 10 000 LEARNING OBJECTIVES SUGGESTED TEACHING AND LEARNING OUTCOMES POINTS TO NOTE VOCABULARY LEARNING ACTIVITIESPupils will be taught to: Pupils will be able to:1. Say and use the • Pupils recite number i. Say the number names Encourage pupils to pronounce number number names in sequence in tens, hundreds to 10 000. the number names correctly. numerals familiar contexts. and thousands up to 10 000. ii. Recognise numerals to Check on pronunciation of recite • Pupils sing number song to 10 000. number names. one thousand, count systematically. one thousand e.g. From 5000 to 5100. iii. Count up to 10 000 Overcome difficulties and and one, one objects by grouping recognise recitation errors. thousand and • Teacher shows different them in thousands, two, … ten representation of numbers up hundreds and tens. Pupils should count thousand to 10 000 using multi-based systematically to keep track of blocks or Cuisenaire rods and the count. count pupils say the numbers. thousands Count a larger collection of hundreds • Pupils count up to 10 000 objects by grouping them in using concrete and thousands, hundreds, and tens. manipulative materials such as Cuisenaire rods or multi- Emphasise skip counting in based blocks. thousands, hundreds, tens, fives, twos and ones. Check for accuracy. 1
  20. 20. Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: NUMBERS TO 10 000 LEARNING OBJECTIVES SUGGESTED TEACHING AND LEARNING OUTCOMES POINTS TO NOTE VOCABULARY LEARNING ACTIVITIESPupils will be taught to: Pupils will be able to:2. Read and write • Teacher says a number, i. Write numerals to Check on pronunciation of numerals numbers to 10 000. pupils write the numerals. 10 000. number names. number names • Pupils fill in the missing ii. Read number words to Overcome difficulties in number words numbers in a sequence or 10 000. spelling and check for one thousand missing digits in a number. accuracy. and one, one iii. Write number words to thousand and • Pupils write numerals for 10 000. two, … nine given number words or vice thousand nine versa. hundred and ninety-nine and • Teacher flashes number word ten thousand cards and pupils read the number words. • Pupils read and spell the number words to ten thousand. • Pupils match numerals with number words. 2
  21. 21. Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: NUMBERS TO 10 000 LEARNING OBJECTIVES SUGGESTED TEACHING AND LEARNING OUTCOMES POINTS TO NOTE VOCABULARY LEARNING ACTIVITIESPupils will be taught to: Pupils will be able to:3. Know what each digit • Represent numbers with i. Recognise the place Emphasise the place value of number in a number manipulatives such as value of numbers. numbers. digit represents. Cuisenaire rods, multi-based blocks or place value material. Emphasise zero as a place thousands holder. hundreds e.g. 8069 tens Thousands Hundreds Tens Ones ones 8 0 6 9 four-digit three-digit In 8069, 0 represents hundreds. two-digit one-digit • Pupils partition three-digit or four-digit numbers into place value thousands, hundreds, tens place holder and ones. partition e.g.1: 3450 3450 is 3 thousands, 4 hundreds, 5 tens and 0 ones. e.g.2: 1258 = 1000 + 200 + 50 + 8 • Pupils recompose numbers. e.g. 9000 + 600 + 5 = 9605 3
  22. 22. Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: NUMBERS TO 10 000 LEARNING OBJECTIVES SUGGESTED TEACHING AND LEARNING OUTCOMES POINTS TO NOTE VOCABULARY LEARNING ACTIVITIESPupils will be taught to: Pupils will be able to:4. Understand and use i. Arrange numbers to Arrange in order a complete set numbers the vocabulary of • Pupils count on and count 10 000: of numbers. comparing and back in thousands. count on arranging numbers a. count on in ones, Emphasise that a number count back e.g. 4000, 5000, 6000, … or quantities to twos, fives, tens, following another number in the next 8240, 7240, 6240, … 10 000. hundreds and counting on sequence is larger. thousands. before Emphasise that a number after b. count back in ones, following another number in the between twos, fives, tens, counting back sequence is hundreds and smaller. thousands. 4
  23. 23. Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: NUMBERS TO 10 000 LEARNING OBJECTIVES SUGGESTED TEACHING AND LEARNING OUTCOMES POINTS TO NOTE VOCABULARY LEARNING ACTIVITIESPupils will be taught to: Pupils will be able to: • Pupils compare two numbers ii. Compare two numbers Check for accuracy in compare using concrete and and say which is more positioning the numbers. more manipulative materials such or less. as Cuisenaire rods or multi- Emphasise comparing two less based blocks. iii. Position numbers in numbers based on place value. arrange order on a number line. order e.g. Which is more? 7823 or 7238 position number line • Pupils compare two numbers smaller based on place value. e.g. 3652 and 3552. smallest larger 3652 largest 3552 3652 is more than 3552. ascending descending • Pupils position a set of sequence numbers on a number line. e.g. 1500, 500, 1000 0 2000 5
  24. 24. Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: NUMBERS TO 10 000 LEARNING OBJECTIVES SUGGESTED TEACHING AND LEARNING OUTCOMES POINTS TO NOTE VOCABULARY LEARNING ACTIVITIESPupils will be taught to: Pupils will be able to:5. Understand and use the • Pupils dip into a bag of beans i. Estimate quantities of Estimation should be done from estimate vocabulary of estimation and take a handful and objects up to 1000. smaller number of objects to estimation and approximation. estimate. larger number. ii. Round whole numbers quantities • Pupils estimate the number of less than 10 000 to the Record estimates and find the actual objects in a transparent nearest 10. difference between the estimate difference container. and the actual number to ensure objects the reasonableness of • Using number lines, pupils estimation. handful round numbers up or down to approximation the nearest 10. If the ones in the number is less round than 5, round down to the lower • Pupils play games or 10. If the ones in the number is 5 whole numbers simulate situations to or greater, round up to the higher nearest enhance their understanding 10. less than of the concepts. lower greater higher 6
  25. 25. Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: ADDITION WITH THE HIGHEST TOTAL OF 10 000 LEARNING OBJECTIVES SUGGESTED TEACHING AND LEARNING OUTCOMES POINTS TO NOTE VOCABULARY LEARNING ACTIVITIESPupils will be taught to: Pupils will be able to:1. Understand addition • Pupils model concept of i. Add up to three numbers Emphasise that adding zero to a numbers as combining two addition using concrete and without regrouping, number leaves the number add groups of objects. manipulative materials such involving up to 4-digit unchanged. as multi-based blocks and numbers. addition Cuisenaire rods. Emphasise mental calculation. plus ii. Add two numbers up to total • Pupils add up to three 4-digit, with regrouping. Emphasise addition using sum numbers with and without standard written method. group regrouping. iii. Add three numbers up to 4-digit, with regrouping. regroup e.g. 687 e.g. 516 + 29 = + 25 without regrouping with regrouping e.g. 3159 zero + 406 digit standard- written method one-digit two-digit three-digit four-digit 7
  26. 26. Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: ADDITION WITH THE HIGHEST TOTAL OF 10 000 LEARNING OBJECTIVES SUGGESTED TEACHING AND LEARNING OUTCOMES POINTS TO NOTE VOCABULARY LEARNING ACTIVITIESPupils will be taught to: Pupils will be able to:2. Use and apply • Pupils solve problems by i. Solve problems involving Use and apply knowledge of add knowledge of addition simulating or modelling addition in real life situations. addition in a variety of contexts plus in real life. situation. Emphasise mental calculation. sum • Pupils pose problems based total on given information Select problems according to number involving addition. pupils’ ability and proficiency in language. sentence solve Encourage pupils to express problems ideas and opinions clearly. modelling 8
  27. 27. Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: SUBTRACTION WITHIN THE RANGE OF 10 000 LEARNING OBJECTIVES SUGGESTED TEACHING AND LEARNING OUTCOMES POINTS TO NOTE VOCABULARY LEARNING ACTIVITIESPupils will be taught to: Pupils will be able to:1. Understand • Model concepts of subtraction i. Subtract two numbers up Emphasise that subtracting zero subtract subtraction as “take using concrete and to 4-digit, without from a number leaves the take away away” or “difference” manipulative materials such regrouping. number unchanged. between two groups of as chips, multi-based blocks minus objects. and Cuisenaire rods. ii. Subtract two numbers up Emphasise mental calculation How many left? to 4-digit, with regrouping. What is left? • Pupils subtract two numbers Emphasise subtraction using with regrouping. standard written method. regrouping zero e.g. 7896 digit - 1253 multiples standard written method e.g. 648 one-digit - 59 two-digit three-digit four-digit 9
  28. 28. Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: SUBTRACTION WITHIN THE RANGE OF 10 000 LEARNING OBJECTIVES SUGGESTED TEACHING AND LEARNING OUTCOMES POINTS TO NOTE VOCABULARY LEARNING ACTIVITIESPupils will be taught to: Pupils will be able to: • Pupils subtract three numbers iii. Subtract three numbers Emphasise subtraction using without regrouping and with up to 4-digit, without standard written method. regrouping. regrouping. e.g. 7859 – 231 – 304 = iv. Subtract three numbers 7859 7628 up to 4-digit, with – 231 – 304 regrouping. 7628 7324 e.g. 95 – 6 – 7 = 95 89 – 6 – 7 89 82 10
  29. 29. Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: SUBTRACTION WITHIN THE RANGE OF 10 000 LEARNING OBJECTIVES SUGGESTED TEACHING AND LEARNING OUTCOMES POINTS TO NOTE VOCABULARY LEARNING ACTIVITIESPupils will be taught to: Pupils will be able to:2. Use and apply • Develop the concept of i. Recognise subtraction as Use and apply knowledge of subtract knowledge of subtraction as the inverse of the inverse of addition. subtraction in a variety of subtraction subtraction in real life. addition by doing these contexts. number sentences. ii. Solve problems involving take away subtraction in real life Continue to develop the minus e.g situations. understanding of subtraction as 3000 + 4000 = 7000 difference taking away and finding the 4000 + 3000 = 7000 difference between two How many left? 7000 – 4000 = 3000 numbers. What is left? 7000 – 3000 = 4000 regrouping Select problems according to • Pupils write as many number pupils’ ability and proficiency in standard written sentences as they can using language. method a set of three numbers. one-digit Discuss further and accept Encourage pupils to express two-digit comments from pupils. ideas and opinions clearly. three-digit • Pupils solve problems by four-digit simulating or modelling addition situations. inverse • Pupils pose problems based solve on given information involving problems subtraction. modelling 11
  30. 30. Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: MULTIPLICATION WITHIN 6, 7, 8 AND 9 TIMES-TABLES LEARNING OBJECTIVES SUGGESTED TEACHING AND LEARNING OUTCOMES POINTS TO NOTE VOCABULARY LEARNING ACTIVITIESPupils will be taught to: Pupils will be able to:1. Understand • Pupils model concept of i. Recognise multiplication Emphasise multiplication as equals multiplication as multiplication as repeated as repeated addition. repeated addition. times repeated addition addition using concrete and (6, 7, 8 and 9 manipulative materials. multiply times-tables). multiplied by e.g. Pupils form 3 groups of 6 skip counting books. times-tables Pupils count the number of multiplication groups and the number of tables books in each group. repeated addition Pupils write the number sentences to find the total number of books in 3 groups. 6 + 6 + 6 = 18 3 x 6 = 18 Relate multiplication to repeated addition. 12
  31. 31. Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: MULTIPLICATION WITHIN 6, 7, 8 AND 9 TIMES-TABLES LEARNING OBJECTIVES SUGGESTED TEACHING AND LEARNING OUTCOMES POINTS TO NOTE VOCABULARY LEARNING ACTIVITIESPupils will be taught to: Pupils will be able to: • Pupils write number ii. Write number sentences Emphasise ‘x’ and ‘=’ signs in times sentences for multiplication. for multiplication. number sentences. multiply e.g.1 iii. Build up the Relate ‘x’ to times and multiply. multiplied by multiplication tables of equals 6, 7, 8 and 9. Read number sentence is equal to 6 x 4 = 24 as “six times four 2 x 7 = 14 iv. Multiply two 1-digit equals twenty-four” or “six skip counting numbers. multiplied by four is equal to times-tables e.g.2 twenty-four.” number sentence 0 6 12 18 24 multiplication Include activities such as making 3 x 6 = 18 multiplication number patterns using • Pupils build up multiplication manipulatives or ICT to build up tables tables of 6, 7, 8 and 9 using multiplication tables. build up concrete objects, manipulative materials or pictorial standard written representations. Emphasise multiplication using method standard written method. e.g. 7 one-digit number 1x8=8 x6 2 x 8 = 16 3 x 8 = 24 13
  32. 32. Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: MULTIPLICATION WITHIN 6, 7, 8 AND 9 TIMES-TABLES LEARNING OBJECTIVES SUGGESTED TEACHING AND LEARNING OUTCOMES POINTS TO NOTE VOCABULARY LEARNING ACTIVITIESPupils will be taught to: Pupils will be able to:2. Know by heart the • Pupils list all possible i. Recall rapidly the Pupils should know by heart the times multiplication tables of combinations of two numbers multiplication facts of 6, basic facts of multiplication multiply 6, 7, 8 and 9. that equals to a given product. 7, 8 and 9 times-tables. involving 6, 7, 8 and 9 times- tables. multiplied by e.g. Product is 72 equals 12 x 6 = 72 Relate skip counting by sixes, is equal to 9 x 8 = 72 sevens, eights and nines to 8 x 9 = 72 multiplication. multiplication 6 x 12 = 72 recall Emphasise mental calculation. skip count • Pupils use flash cards and say aloud multiplication facts. • Pupils memorise multiplication tables by singing or chanting. • Pupils respond rapidly to oral and written questions such as: e.g. 8 times 7. Multiply 9 by 6. 14
  33. 33. Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: MULTIPLICATION WITHIN 6, 7, 8 AND 9 TIMES-TABLES LEARNING OBJECTIVES SUGGESTED TEACHING AND LEARNING OUTCOMES POINTS TO NOTE VOCABULARY LEARNING ACTIVITIESPupils will be taught to: Pupils will be able to:3. Use and apply • Pupils find unknown numbers i. Find unknown numbers Use and apply knowledge of unknown knowledge of in number sentences. in number sentences. multiplication in a variety of numbers multiplication in real contexts. times life. e.g. x 8 = 56 ii. Solve problems involving multiplication in real life Emphasise finding unknown multiply x = 81 situations. numbers in number sentences multiplied by as follows: equals • Pupils solve problems by a. 2 x 6 = is equal to simulating or modelling a. 9 x = 63 number sentence situations. b. x 8 = 24 solve • Pupils pose problems based on given information involving c. x = 49 multiplication. d. = =8x7 e. 72 = 9 x f. 64 = x8 g. 54 = x Emphasise mental calculation. Select problems according to pupils’ ability and proficiency in language. 15
  34. 34. Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: MULTIPLICATION WITH THE HIGHEST PRODUCT OF 1000 LEARNING OBJECTIVES SUGGESTED TEACHING AND LEARNING OUTCOMES POINTS TO NOTE VOCABULARY LEARNING ACTIVITIESPupils will be taught to: Pupils will be able to:1. Understand and use • Pupils use concrete materials i. Multiply 2-digit numbers Emphasise that any number times the operation of and pictorial representations by 1-digit numbers multiplied by zero results in zero. multiply multiplication. to develop the concept of without regrouping. e.g. multiplication. 6x0=0 multiplied by ii. Multiply 2-digit numbers 0x6=0 equals • Pupils multiply two numbers by 10. without regrouping. is equal to Emphasise that a number iii. Multiply 2-digit numbers multiplied by one will give an without e.g. 1. 14 x 2 = 28 by 1-digit numbers with answer the same as the number. regrouping 2. 80 x 10 = 800 regrouping. e.g. with regrouping 3. 213 x 3 = 639 18 x 1 = 18 multiplication iv. Multiply 3-digit numbers 1 x 18 = 18 • Pupils multiply two numbers by 1-digit numbers product with regrouping. without regrouping. Emphasis e multiplication using e.g. standard written method. v. Multiply 3-digit numbers 1. 57 x 6 = 342 by 1-digit numbers with 2. 438 x 4 = 1752 Emphasise mental calculation. regrouping. • Pupils multiply two numbers mentally by partitioning the multiplier. e.g. 23 x 4 = 20 x 4 = 80 3 x 4 = 12 23 x 4 = 92 16
  35. 35. Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: MULTIPLICATION WITH THE HIGHEST PRODUCT OF 1000 LEARNING OBJECTIVES SUGGESTED TEACHING AND LEARNING OUTCOMES POINTS TO NOTE VOCABULARY LEARNING ACTIVITIESPupils will be taught to: Pupils will be able to: • Pupils solve problems by vi. Solve problems involving Use and apply knowledge of times simulating or modelling multiplication in real life multiplication in a variety of multiply situations. situations. contexts. multiplied by • Pupils pose problems based Continue to develop the equals on given information involving understanding of multiplication is equal to multiplication. as repeated addition. without Select problems according to regrouping pupils’ ability and proficiency in with regrouping language. multiplication Encourage pupils to express product ideas and opinions clearly. solve problems 17
  36. 36. Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: DIVISION WITHIN 6, 7, 8 AND 9 TIMES-TABLES LEARNING OBJECTIVES SUGGESTED TEACHING AND LEARNING OUTCOMES POINTS TO NOTE VOCABULARY LEARNING ACTIVITIESPupils will be taught to: Pupils will be able to:1. Understand division as • Pupils model the concept of i. Recognise division as Relate division as sharing share sharing equally or division using concrete and sharing equally. equally or grouping. sharing equally grouping. manipulative materials. (Corresponding to 6, 7, Use ‘÷’ and ‘=’ signs in number grouping 8 and 9 times-tables) a: Sharing equally sentences. times-tables e.g. Relate ‘÷’ to sharing equally or divide 14 flowers are shared equally grouping in sixes, sevens, eights equals between 7 girls. Each girl gets and nines. is equal to 2 flowers. Read number sentence division 21÷ 7 = 3 as “twenty-one divided by seven equals three” or “twenty-one divided by seven is equal to three”. Use manipulatives to help pupils see the relationship between division and multiplication. e.g. 72 ÷ 9 = 8 9 x 8 = 72 Use multiplication tables to develop division skills. 14 ÷ 7 = 2 18
  37. 37. Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: DIVISION WITHIN 6, 7, 8 AND 9 TIMES-TABLES LEARNING OBJECTIVES SUGGESTED TEACHING AND LEARNING OUTCOMES POINTS TO NOTE VOCABULARY LEARNING ACTIVITIESPupils will be taught to: Pupils will be able to: b. Grouping ii. Recognise division as Emphasise division using share equally grouping. standard written method. group in sixes e.g. 12 ÷ 6 = 2 iii. Write number sentences group in sevens e.g. 8 24 for division. group in eights Exclude division with group in nines iv. Divide numbers within the multiplication tables. remainders. divide division divided by • Pupils write number equals sentences for division. is equal to e.g. standard written method multiplication tables number sentence 24 ÷ 8 = 3 19
  38. 38. Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: DIVISION WITHIN 6, 7, 8 AND 9 TIMES-TABLES LEARNING OBJECTIVES SUGGESTED TEACHING AND LEARNING OUTCOMES POINTS TO NOTE VOCABULARY LEARNING ACTIVITIESPupils will be taught to: Pupils will be able to:2. Derive quickly division • Pupils use flash cards and i. Derive quickly division Pupils should know by heart the divide facts. say division facts aloud. facts of 6, 7, 8 and 9 division facts of 6, 7, 8 and 9 division (Corresponding to 6, 7, times-tables. times-tables. 8 and 9 times-tables) • Pupils respond rapidly to oral share equally and written questions. Emphasise mental calculation. group number sentence e.g. Share 25 among 5. Divide 30 by 6. derive 20
  39. 39. Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: DIVISION WITHIN 6, 7, 8 AND 9 TIMES-TABLES LEARNING OBJECTIVES SUGGESTED TEACHING AND LEARNING OUTCOMES POINTS TO NOTE VOCABULARY LEARNING ACTIVITIESPupils will be taught to: Pupils will be able to:3. Use and apply • Pupils solve problems by i. Find unknown numbers Select problems according to divide knowledge of division simulating or modelling in number sentences. pupils’ ability and proficiency in share equally in real life. situations. language. ii. Solve problems involving number sentence e.g. division in real life Use and apply knowledge of divide Jeya has made a pattern situations. division in a variety of contexts. unknown using 12 tiles. One tile in numbers Emphasise finding unknown every four is red. How many numbers in number sentences modeling tiles are red? as follows. simulating • Pupils pose problems based e.g: equals on given information involving division. is equal to a. 40 ÷ 8 = b. 49 ÷ =7 with remainder e.g. 30 ÷ 5 = 6 without a. ÷9=3 remainders I have 30 cakes. One box b. ÷ =9 solve holds 5 cakes. So I need 6 boxes to hold all the cakes. c. = 36 ÷ 9 problems d. 4 = 32 ÷ • Pupils find unknown numbers in number sentences. e. 9= ÷7 f. 8= ÷ e.g. 48 ÷ =8 21
  40. 40. Year 3TOPIC: WHOLE NUMBERSLEARNING AREA: DIVISION WITH THE HIGHEST DIVIDEND OF 1000 LEARNING OBJECTIVES SUGGESTED TEACHING AND LEARNING OUTCOMES POINTS TO NOTE VOCABULARY LEARNING ACTIVITIESPupils will be taught to: Pupils will be able to:1. Understand and use • Pupils use concrete materials i. Divide 2-digit numbers Exclude zero as divisor. divide the operation of and pictorial representations by 1-digit numbers divided by division. to develop the concept of without remainders. Emphasise that a number division. divided by one will give an division ii. Divide 2-digit numbers answer the same as the number. sharing equally • Pupils divide two numbers by 10 without remainders. equals without remainders. Emphasise division using iii. Divide 2-digit number standard written method. is equal to e.g. by 1-digit numbers with with remainder 1. 35 ÷ 7 = 5 remainders. Emphasise mental calculation. without 2. 60 ÷ 10 = 6 remainders 3. 408 ÷ 2 = 204 iv. Divide 2-digit numbers Continue to develop the by 10 with remainders. understanding of division as • Pupils divide two numbers sharing equally and grouping. with remainders. v. Divide 3-digit numbers by 1-digit numbers Encourage pupils to express e.g. without remainders. ideas and opinions clearly. 1. 37 ÷ 6 = 6 remainder 1 2. 525 ÷ 10 = 52 remainder 5 vi. Divide 3-digit numbers 3. 106 ÷ 4 = 26 remainder 2 by 1-digit numbers with remainders. 22

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