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Presentación de Johansen Quijano Cruz en el X Congreso Puertorriqueño de Investigación en la Educación

Presentación de Johansen Quijano Cruz en el X Congreso Puertorriqueño de Investigación en la Educación
Video Games and Learning

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    Johansen Quijano, Presentación en el X Congreso, Video Games and Learning Johansen Quijano, Presentación en el X Congreso, Video Games and Learning Presentation Transcript

    • HOW VIDEO GAMES AFFECT LEARNING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE University of Puerto Rico X Congreso de Investigación en la Educación Prepared by Johansen Quijano Cruz
    • OUTLINE Previous studies about video games Concerns about violence A study about the effects of video games on student attitudes A study about the effects of video games on students’ academic achievement Purpose Justification Research Questions Limitations Methodology Procedure Ethical Considerations Statistical Analysis Findings Conclusions Recommendations Questions References
    • Previous Video Games in Education Research Brownfield & Vik (1983); Gee (2003) Video games improve literacy skills Wood & Stewart (1987) Video games improve reasoning skills Starbuck and Webster (1991) Game players concentrate more become more absorbed in tasks learn better are more creative Feng S. Din (2000) Children who play Playstation games 40 minutes a day in school do better in spelling and decoding than those who do not play video games. Hansson (2005) Students are more motivated to use the English language during and right after playing a multiplayer video game and when writing online Blogs than during formal lessons. Gee (2003) Children who play Pokemon learn to read faster than those who do not play Pokemon Johnson (2005) Elementary schoolchildren learn about economics through Sim City 2000 Game players are more social, more confident, and more comfortable solving problems creatively.
    • Video Games and Violence Scientific Evidence Under controlled conditions, people who play Wolfenstein 3D will blast someone with noise for .21 seconds longer than someone who played Myst (Gee, 2006, p. 13) The effect-size on aggression for playing video games is smaller than the effect size for television (Gee, 2006, p. 14) According to U.S. Surgeon General David Satcher, “violent media falls under ‘small effect size’ influence” (Abanes, 2006, 95) Statistical Evidence 50% of Americans play video games People who claim to be inspired by games to commit violent acts make up less then one percent of those who play video games. (Masell, 2003) According to FBI and U.S. Department of Justice, violent crime has decreased steadily since 1985, the year when video games became mainstream. (Johnson, 2005, p. 191).
    • PHASE I: ATTITUDES The effects of video games in students’ attitudes towards learning English as a second language
    • Phase I: Attitudes Purpose and Justification The purpose of this investigation was to find Justification: out if: It may be possible that there is a Video games, relationship between Puerto Rican specifically role playing video game-playing teenagers’ games (RPGs) have an observed positive attitudes towards effect on students’ the English language and their attitudes towards the English language playing video games. If such a relationship is discovered, ESL Video games can be educators in Puerto Rico could used in the classroom, improve non-video game-playing both as a teaching tool students’ attitudes towards the and as a means to English language by using video improve students’ games in the classroom. attitudes towards the English language
    • Phase I: Attitudes Research Questions and Limitations The following research questions guided this study: Limitations: Do video games influence 100 participants students’ attitudes towards Convenience sampling the English language? If so, how? Lack of control over other variables Do video games influence Small amount of literature students’ attitudes towards exists on the topic reading in the English language? If so, how? There are no previous investigations regarding Do video games influence video games and the students’ attitudes towards English language in Puerto the English class? If so, how? Rico
    • Phase I: Attitudes Methodology and Procedure General Methodology Procedure Information •Obtained permission Correlation study with survey design •Collected data Target population: Teenagers from Puerto Rico’s metropolitan •Input data into statistical analysis area software Sample: 100 teenagers from •Analyzed data Puerto Rico’s metropolitan area •Produce final report
    • Phase I: Attitudes Ethical Considerations The researcher provided the participants with a formal letter of consent stating the following: Purpose of the study Kind of research design to be implemented Request of parents’ authorization for underage participants Request for voluntary participation in study Statement informing the participant the right to abandon the study at any time Assurance of confidentiality Commitment of the researcher to inform the results and findings of the study.
    • Phase I: Attitudes Statistical Analysis Pearson’s Correlation Formula Items considered: • Item # 1 - I possess basic English skills. • Item # 2 – I like to play video games • Item # 3 – I enjoy playing Role Playing Games (RPGs) • Item # 4 – I like the English language • Item # 5 – I like the English class • Item # 6 – I like to read in English
    • Phase I: Attitudes Findings Pearson’s correlation value for the variables of degrees of English proficiency and frequency of playing video games is .65 Pearson’s correlation value for the variables of degrees of English proficiency and frequency of playing RPGs is .85 Pearson’s correlation value for the variables of video game playing frequency and attitudes towards the English language is .69 Pearson’s correlation value for the variables of RPG playing frequency and attitudes towards the English language is .89 Pearson’s correlation value for the variables of video game playing frequency and attitudes towards the ESL class is .08 Pearson’s correlation value for the variables of RPG playing frequency and attitudes towards the ESL class is .31 Pearson’s correlation value for the variables of video game playing frequency and attitudes towards reading in the English language is .66 Pearson’s correlation value for the variables of RPG playing frequency and attitudes towards reading in the English language is .93
    • Phase I: Attitudes Conclusions The use of role playing games has some effect on students’ attitudes towards the English language. Role playing games influence these attitudes in a positive manner. The use of role playing games has a major effect in students’ attitudes towards reading in the English language. Role playing games greatly influence student’s attitudes towards reading in the English language in a positive manner. Video games do not have any effects on student attitudes towards the English class. Incorporating video games into the ESL classroom curriculum makes class more enjoyable for students. Using video games in the ESL classroom motivates students to learn the language in order to complete the game.
    • PHASE II: ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT The effects of video games on post-secondary students’ academic achievement
    • Phase II: Academic Achievement Purpose and Justification The purpose of this investigation was to Justification: find out: If a the use of role playing How the integration games in the ESL of virtual interactive role playing classroom does, in fact, simulations – or Role improve students’ Playing Games - used as an alternative academic performance, form of literature in video games could be the ESL curriculum affects the student integrated into ESL academic classrooms as a teaching performance of aid. college students.
    • Phase II: Academic Achievement Research Questions and Limitations The following research Limitations: questions guided 36 participants this study: Convenience sampling Lack of control over some variables Does exposing students Small amount of to role playing games literature exists on the affect their academic topic performance in the ESL class? If exposure to video games affects academic performance, what is the effect?
    • Phase II: Academic Achievement Methodology and Procedure General Methodology Information Procedure Quasi-experimental design with a pre-test and post- test. •Obtained permission •Explained procedures Target population: Post- •Proceed with treatment secondary students from Puerto Rico’s metropolitan •Collect data area •Input data into statistical analysis software Sample: 38 post-secondary students from a small •Analyzed data college in Puerto Rico’s •Produce final report metropolitan area
    • Phase II: Academic Achievement Ethical Considerations The researcher provided the participants with a formal letter of consent stating the following: Purpose of the study Kind of research design to be implemented Request of parents’ authorization for underage participants Request for voluntary participation in study Statement informing the participant the right to abandon the study at any time Assurance of confidentiality Commitment of the researcher to inform the results and findings of the study.
    • Phase II: Academic Achievement Statistical Analysis Standard percentage difference Procedure: equation: •Permissions were obtained •Treatment was carried out •Data was collected •Data was input into the computer •Pre and Post test totals were obtained •Difference in results were arrived at by using the standard percentage difference equation
    • Phase II: Academic Achievement Findings and Conclusions Findings Conclusions The treatment group The use of role playing games like Growlanser: demonstrated a 40.58% Generations as a form of increase in academic new-media literature, when achievement between the used along with traditional pre-test and the post-test, curriculum activities, affect student academic while the constant group performance in a positive demonstrated an increase in manner. academic achievement of only 17.85%. This means that students who presented on video games showed an academic performance increase of 94.94% over than those who presented on books.
    • Recommendations Provisions should be made for students to have access to role playing games in the ESL classroom Video games should be integrated into the ESL curriculum Teachers should play and evaluate role playing games before they are added to their lessons Students should be given a period of play during the week Teachers who decide to integrate video games into their lessons should design activities around them
    • QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS
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