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Taal Volcano Protective Landscape -forested area

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  • 1. HISTORY March 2, 1978, Ferdinand E. Marcos, President of the Philippines, signed into Law Presidential Decree No. 1308, otherwise known as the “Law Regulating the Practice of Environmental Planning in the Philippines”
  • 2. Tropical rainforests are found near the equator. They are vital storehouses of biodiversity on the planet, and yet face severe threat today, with much of their original extent depleted.
  • 3. Tropical rainforests are found near the equator. They are vital storehouses of biodiversity on the planet, and yet face severe threat today, with much of their original extent depleted.
  • 4. Sub-tropical forests are in areas outside of the strict equatorial region but either within or bordering the tropical zone and have more noticeable seasonal changes.
  • 5. Sub-tropical forests are in areas outside of the strict equatorial region but either within or bordering the tropical zone and have more noticeable seasonal changes.
  • 6. Mediterranean/boreal forests These forests are found to the south of the temperate regions around the coasts of the Mediterranean, California, Chile and Western Australia. The growing season is short and almost all trees are evergreen, but mixed hardwood and softwood.
  • 7. Mediterranean/boreal forests These forests are found to the south of the temperate regions around the coasts of the Mediterranean, California, Chile and Western Australia. The growing season is short and almost all trees are evergreen, but mixed hardwood and softwood.
  • 8. Temperate forests Found in such places as eastern North America, northeastern Asia, and western and eastern Europe, temperate forests are a mix of deciduous and coniferous evergreen trees. Usually, the broad-leaved hardwood trees shed leaves annually. There are well-defined seasons with a distinct winter and sufficient rainfall.
  • 9. Temperate forests Found in such places as eastern North America, northeastern Asia, and western and eastern Europe, temperate forests are a mix of deciduous and coniferous evergreen trees. Usually, the broad-leaved hardwood trees shed leaves annually. There are well-defined seasons with a distinct winter and sufficient rainfall.
  • 10. Forest plantations generally intended for the production of timber and pulpwood increase the total area of forest worldwide. Commonly mono-specific and/or composed of introduced tree species, these ecosystems are not generally important as habitat for native biodiversity.
  • 11. Forest plantations generally intended for the production of timber and pulpwood increase the total area of forest worldwide. Commonly mono-specific and/or composed of introduced tree species, these ecosystems are not generally important as habitat for native biodiversity.
  • 12. Formulate and recommend policies, guidelines, rules and regulations for the establishment and management of an Integrated Protected Areas System such as national parks, wildlife sanctuaries and refuge, marine parks and biospheric reserves
  • 13. proper management on environmental concerns--air quality management, water quality management, Solid waste management, Environmental assessment
  • 14. provides support for the effective protection, development, occupancy management, and conservation of forest lands and watersheds. It collaborates with international and local development organizations in several forestry development programs.
  • 15. Haribon Foundation Philippines pioneer environmental organization. Hatched in 1972, the organization, and the individuals it trained and nurtured were instrumental in the formation of other environmental organizations in the country.
  • 16. the southern part of the main island Luzon CALABARZON
  • 17. BATANGAS One of the most popular tourist destinations near Metro Manila. The province has many beaches and famous for excellent diving spots only a few hours away from Manila.
  • 18. SLOPE AND TOPOGRAPHY mostly elevated lands rolling hills small low flat lands and numerous mountains CLIMATE AND RAINFALL The climate of Batangas is generally cool and the air is humid. May is the hottest month and the coldest is February. The rainfall is almost equally distributed throughout the province in terms of millimeters except in western section which has a little more. Batangas shares with laguna and Quezon, Mt. Makiling and Mt. Malipunyo and Tagaytay Ridge with Tagaytay City.
  • 19.           
  • 20. LAUREL 4th class municipality in the Province of Batangas. This town is named in honor of Miguel Laurel known as the first Laurel in the Philippines.
  • 21. TANAUAN CITY Called the cradle of noble heroes due to its contribution to the revolutionary movement of its sons Apolinario Mabini , the brains of Katipunan , and later by the great statesman Pres. Jose P. Laurel . The soil types are: loam, lipa loam, lipa loam deep phase, tagaytay sandy loam and taal loam which will make the place conducive to agricultural production.
  • 22. TALISAY Located in the north-central area of Batangas, bordered by Tagaytay City in the north, the municipality of Laurel to the west, Tanauan City to the east, and a vast volcanic lake called Taal Lake to the south. Talisay has recently reinvented itself into a Resort town, making use of the superb view and access that they have to Taal Volcano and Taal Lake. Many resorts that fit a wide range of budgets has sprouted along the town.
  • 23. BALETE 5th class municipality in the Province of Batangas. Well known for its location, panoramic view of the Taal Volcano. And for Marian Orchard that, that is located at Malaban, Balete.
  • 24. MATAAS NA KAHOY 4th class municipality in the Province of Batangas, Philippines. It is bounded by Balete and Lipa City with Taal Lake limiting its western side (Lat 13.9603; Long 121.1158). The name Mataas na Kahoy literally means "tall tree". The town is known for its cool climate due to its high elevation 379 metres (1,243 ft).
  • 25. LIPA CITY 1st class city in the province of Batangas. Bounded by the town of Santo Tomas in the northeast, San Pablo City of Laguna and San Antonio of Quezon in the east. It is a major recreational, religious, commercial, industrial and educational center in central Batangas province
  • 26. AGONCILLO 3rd class municipality in the Province of Batangas, Philippines. Bounded in the east by approximately 10 km lakeshore of Taal Lake
  • 27. CUENCA 4th class municipality in the province of Batangas. "The Home Of The Bakers“ Cuenca is situated on a plain at the foot of Mt. Makulot, close to the southern edge of Taal Lake.
  • 28. SAN NICHOLAS 5th class municipality in the province of Batangas, Philippines. It is the smallest municipality in Batangas with 14.34 square kilometers of land area, which includes half of the Taal volcano island.
  • 29. ALITAGTAG 4th class municipality in the Province of Batangas.
  • 30. STA. TERESITA 4th class municipality in the province of Batangas Situated along the southern lakeshore area of Taal Lake.
  • 31. TAGAYTAY CITY
  • 32. Taal Lake covers a total area of 24,356 hectares. It is connected to Balayan Bay through the Pansipit River
  • 33. The world's largest volcanic island that is on a lake , on a larger island , on a larger lake , on another (bigger) island.
  • 34. The Mouth of Taal Volcano: This Crater lake is highly sulfuric lake may have medicinal properties. It is the real Taal volcano.
  • 35. This tiny verdant island, called Vulcan Point or sometimes Vulcan Island, lies at the center of a strange-but-entirely-true natural wonder.
  • 36. The volcano features of the island suggest that there are at least 35 eruption cones and 47 craters of depressions formed either by direct explosive eruptions or collapsed subsidence.
  • 37. There are about 35 different volcanic landforms. This strongly indicates the eruption centers of Taal Volcano are numerous, complex and may erupt from any other points.
  • 38. MAIN CRATER (1749, 1754, 1911 eruptions) BININTIANG MALAKI (1767,1715 eruptions) BININTIANG MUNTI (1709. 1731 eruptions) PIRA-PIRASO (1731 eruptions) OFF CALAUIT (1716 eruptions) MT. TABARO (1976-1977 eruptions)
  • 39. AREA SUSCEPTIBLE TO BASE SURGE LAKE/WATERBODIES Hazard zone limits are based on data from historical eruptions of 1764, 1911 and 1946
  • 40. Houses were covered with ashfalls during 1965 eruption Taal Volcano,1965
  • 41. Taal Volcano,1965 Turbulent mass of ejected fragmented volcanic materials (ash and rocks), mixed with hot gases that flow downslope/away from crater at very high speed (>60kph)
  • 42. AREA SUSCEPTIBLE TO BALLISTIC PROJECTILES LAKE/WATERBODIES Taal volcano island has been designated as permanent danger zone
  • 43. AREA SUSCEPTIBLE TO SELCHES/LAKEWATER OSCILLATION LAKE/WATERBODIES
  • 44. The Taal Volcano Protected Landscape was proclaimed a Protected Area in 1997 and covers 65,000 hectares.
  • 45. TVPL is a very important ecosystem because it supports a good number of diverse fauna, comprised of both freshwater and marine species that are commercially important. TVPL is part of the tentative list in order to qualify for inclusion in the World Heritage List submitted by the DENR-PAWB TVPL Work Plan Water quality monitoring Volunteer Involvement Reduction of pollution from land Cage regulations Basic environmental tourism course and master planning Rules and Fees establishment Information and training centers Volcano Monitoring Disaster response drill Source: TVPL 2010 quarter report to PAMB
  • 46. (Defense of Nature) is a non-stock, non-profit and non-governmental organization doing public interest lawyering in the Philippines.
  • 47. PAMB (Protected Area Management Board) is a multi-sectoral body responsible for the administration and management of all protected areas in the Philippines. Created through NIPAS Act. It is governed by a Protected Area Management Board of over 150 people meeting twice yearly, and an Executive Board elected from the PAMB which meets quarterly. Agencies, NGOs, LGUs, Volunteers etc. under PAMB-TVPL includes the ff: BFAR (Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources) Lakeshhore Municipalities TK ( Tanggol Kalikasan) UP Los Banos - Research Council DENR (Department of Environment and Natural Resources) PHIVOLCS
  • 48. The Protected Area Management Board of Taal Volcano Protected Landscape unanimously approved on November 26, 2009 a ten-year Management Plan for the lake basin.
  • 49. The PAMB was created with a membership of about 30, consisting of the planning officers of the towns in the basin. The existence of the PAMB was reported to be the reason President Estrada abolished the PCTT – so that there would be no overlap in jurisdictions.
  • 50. On December 17, 2009, the approved plan was placed in a time capsule and buried on the grounds of the Batangas Capitol marked by a Sampaga tree planted by the Governor herself. The capsule is to be unearthed after ten years to see how the lake has fared.
  • 51. In 2004, at a meeting of key stakeholders including the Chief Executives of all the lakeshore municipalities, issues of Taal Lake Management were coming to the fore and the Mayors were briefed about the status of the Protected Area Management Board. In 2006, a covenant among all the mayors and the Governor was signed for the protection of the lake.
  • 52. This covenant and the to the resulting commitments led first drafting and approval of a Unified Rules and Regulations for Fisheries in the lake, and then to the crafting of the first protected area management plan in the country that is funded by local governments and is in two languages (English and Filipino). PAMB membership now stands at 157, with a 35 member Executive Committee.
  • 53. PAMB Executive Committee committed to contribute P75,000 for each town, P2,000 for each barangay, and P500,000 for the Provincial Government to fund the process of management planning to be facilitated by TK.
  • 54. Technical Drafting Committee – workers are pro bono, whereas, the draft was completed last May 2008. Soon after it was approved, It is set to be implemented last January 2010. Other part of the plans includes: Activities to maintain and monitor water quality, zoning for forests, fish sanctuary and agro-tourism A reliance on counterpart contributions by stakeholders Better law enforcement Keeping current population levels Disaster preparedness Solid waste management Target full census in 3 years and then a stable population for more than ten years. Current 2007 stats place basinwide population at under 350,00 at 65,000Ha, it’s 1,800 sqm per person.
  • 55. Unregulated Entry of Fishing Practices No limit on the number of fishing units and types of gears to be used Social conflicts arise Limited Livelihood opportunities around the lake Policy Matrix of Local Legislations CONTROL OF FISH CAGE CONSTRUCTION -To pay taxes of Php0.60-6.00 per sqm CONTROL OF POLLUTION IN TAAL LAKE -Cleaning of Municipal park and shortlines BEACH RESORTS -Raised of Permit Fees
  • 56. They know only 5 out of 20 Ordinances but still didn’t practice No information from the Local Government to inform them Ordinances are not strictly implemented IGNORED NO FISH WARDEN POLITICAL INTERFERENCE LACK OF UNITY AND COOPERATION LACK OF GOOD LEADERS
  • 57. COMMUNITY Fish farmers
  • 58. COMMUNITY Fish farmers Residents
  • 59. COMMUNITY Fish farmers Residents Local Government Units
  • 60. TOURISTS
  • 61. FLORA AND FAUNA
  • 62. In fishing the aquaculture practice deteriorate the lake’s biodiversity
  • 63. In fishing the aquaculture practice deteriorate the lake’s biodiversity the Aquaculture community extended their limitations in lake’s capacity to hold the livelihood.
  • 64. In fishing the aquaculture practice deteriorate the lake’s biodiversity the Aquaculture community extendedly there limitations in lake’s capacity to hold the livelihood. Illegal fish cages are owned by big time businessmen
  • 65. In fishing, the aquaculture practice deteriorate the lake’s biodiversity the Aquaculture community extended their limitations in lake’s capacity to hold the livelihood. Illegal fish cages are owned by big time businessmen Condominium development in Tagaytay Ridge
  • 66. PORT ST. MICHEL
  • 67. PORT ST. MICHEL Port Saint Michel is a Residential tourism Center located at brgy. Gonzales of tanauan, batangas.
  • 68. A residential community and tourism resorts would also be established according to the plan. The Project construction in the present is continued.
  • 69. The lake and its environs is home to many species of flora and fauna CRATER LAKE the largest lake on an island in a lake on an island . VOLCANIC POINT small volcanic island situated in Crater Lake
  • 70. The lake and its environs is home to many species of flora and fauna NATURAL HABITAT “ Tawilis” (Sardinella tawilis), the only fresh water sardine in the world Taal Lake Seasnake (Hydrophis semperi or known to locals as Duhol), the only freshwater sea snake in the world “ WORLD’S LARGEST VOLCANO ISLAND ON A LAKE ON AN ISLAND ON A LARGER LAKE ON A BIGGER ISLAND”
  • 71. Results of comprehensive studies done in the lake must be widely disseminated to concerned sectors.
  • 72. Results of comprehensive studies done in the lake must be widely disseminated to concerned sectors. Non-formal education and training should be given to fisher folk and families so that livelihood alternatives and their perceptions and knowledge of the lake’s limits can be expanded.
  • 73. Results of comprehensive studies done in the lake must be widely disseminated to concerned sectors. Non-formal education and training should be given to fisher folk and families so that livelihood alternatives and their perceptions and knowledge of the lake’s limits can be expanded. DA, BFAR, DENR should forge an agreement with LGUs for a continuing assessment of fishery resources in the lake.
  • 74. Results of comprehensive studies done in the lake must be widely disseminated to concerned sectors. Non-formal education and training should be given to fisher folk and families so that livelihood alternatives and their perceptions and knowledge of the lake’s limits can be expanded. DA, BFAR, DENR should forge an agreement with LGUs for a continuing assessment of fishery resources in the lake. Budgetary allocations should be increased for new research and extension to address problems and issues of the fishery sector in Taal.
  • 75. Results of comprehensive studies done in the lake must be widely disseminated to concerned sectors. Non-formal education and training should be given to fisher folk and families so that livelihood alternatives and their perceptions and knowledge of the lake’s limits can be expanded. DA, BFAR, DENR should forge an agreement with LGUs for a continuing assessment of fishery resources in the lake. Budgetary allocations should be increased for new research and extension to address problems and issues of the fishery sector in Taal. Policy formulation and implementation are formidable tasks, hence, the capability of local and sectoral policy and decision makers must be continously upgraded
  • 76. There are limited inputs to local government decision-making process.
  • 77. There are limited inputs to local government decision-making process. Fish cages increase in overall fish production (particularly Tilapia) but they threaten the indigenous species such as Tawilis and Maliputo that are dwindling.
  • 78. There are limited inputs to local government decision-making process. Fish cages increase in overall fish production (particularly Tilapia) but they threaten the indigenous species such as Tawilis and Maliputo that are dwindling. The fisherfolk have little knowledge of ordinances and these have little impact on their behavior as lake users.
  • 79. There are limited inputs to local government decision-making process. Fish cages increase in overall fish production (particularly Tilapia) but they threaten the indigenous species such as Tawilis and Maliputo that are dwindling. The fisherfolk have little knowledge of ordinances and these have little impact on their behavior as lake users. Open acess policy is worsening the pressure on the lake ecosystem and lowering the income of marginalized fisherfolk.
  • 80. There are limited inputs to local government decision-making process. Fish cages increase in overall fish production (particularly Tilapia) but they threaten the indigenous species such as Tawilis and Maliputo that are dwindling. The fisherfolk have little knowledge of ordinances and these have little impact on their behavior as lake users. Open acess policy is worsening the pressure on the lake ecosystem and lowering the income of marginalized fisherfolk. There is low compliance with local ordinances. Legislations seem ineffective.
  • 81. 5 AR 5 ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING Forested Area - TVPL © ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2010