Wuthering heights

  • 1,088 views
Uploaded on

 

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
1,088
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
9
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. 1mag 17­20.14
  • 2. 2nov 3­16.01
  • 3. 3mag 17­20.15
  • 4. 4nov 3­15.18Emily Brontë hits the heights in poll to find greatest love storyThe Readers Guide toEmily Brontë’s “Wuthering Heights”
  • 5. 5nov 3­15.36NarrativeAnalysisTHE ENGLISH GOTHIC NOVEL: A BRIEF OVERVIEW
  • 6. 6nov 3­16.17Wuthering Heights straddles literary traditions and genres. It combines elements of the Romantictale of evil­possession, and Romantic developments of the eighteenth­century Gothic novel, withthe developing Victorian tradition of Domestic fiction in a realist mode. Its use of the ballad andfolk material, romance forms and the fantastic, its emphasis on the passions, its view of childhood,and the representation of the romantic quest for selfhood and of aspiring individualism, all link thenovel with Romanticism. On the other hand, the novel’s movement towards a renewed emphasis oncommunity and duty, and towards an idealisation of the family seem to be more closely related tothe emerging concerns of Victorian fiction. Emily Brontë’s novel mixes these various traditions andgenres in a number of interesting ways, sometimes fusing and sometimes juxtaposing them. I wantto direct attention to the ways in which the novel’s mixing of genres may be related to issues ofgender by examining some of the ways in which specific historic genres may be related to particularhistoric definitions of gender.Pykett, Lyn, Emily Brontë.—﴾Women writers﴿, 1989Impossible to categorise
  • 7. 7nov 15­21.32Indeed, much of the distinctiveness of Emily Brontë’s novel may be attributed to the particular ways in which it negotiates different literary traditions, and both combines and explores two major fictional genres ­ the Gothic and Domestic fiction ­ which are usually associated with the female writers of the period, although by no means confined to them.Pykett, Lyn, Emily Brontë.—﴾Women writers﴿, 1989
  • 8. 8nov 3­16.31In its transition from patriarchal tyranny, masculine competition, domestic imprisonment and the Gothic to the revised Domestic romance of the courtship and companionate marriage of Catherine and Hareton, Wuthering Heights both participates in, and engages with, the feminisation of literature and the wider culture noted by Armstrong and Spencer. However, I would suggest thatEmily Brontë’s novel does not simply reflect or represent this process, but that it also investigates and explores it. The narrative disruptions, the dislocations of chronology, the mixing of genres and Brontë’s historical displacement of her story, published in 1847 but set in a carefully dated period leading up to and just beyond 1801, combine to produce a novel which goes back and traces bothchanging patterns of fiction and the emergence of new forms of the family.Pykett, Lyn, Emily Brontë.—﴾Women writers﴿, 1989
  • 9. 9nov 15­19.23However, at the same time as Wuthering Heights traces the emergence of the modern family and its hegemonic fictional form of Domestic realism, other elements of the novel ­ its disrupted chronology, its dislocated narrative structure, and the persistence of the disturbing power of Catherine and Heathcliff ­ work together to keep other versions of domestic life before the reader: the domestic space as prison, the family as site of primitive passions, violence, struggle and control. In its mixing of genres and in the particular genres it chooses to mix Wuthering Heights may,perhaps, be placed with those female fictions which, as Judith Lowder Newton argues ‘both supportand resist ideologies which have tied middle­class women to the relative powerlessness of their lot and which have prevented them from having a true knowledge of their situation’.Pykett, Lyn, Emily Brontë.—﴾Women writers﴿, 1989
  • 10. 10nov 3­17.09Wuthering Heights Chapter 9 
  • 11. 11nov 15­19.23
  • 12. 12nov 15­19.28
  • 13. 13nov 15­19.29
  • 14. 14nov 15­19.33
  • 15. 15nov 15­19.33Who are they?
  • 16. 16nov 15­19.42
  • 17. 17nov 15­19.44DOUBLE2 houses2 narrators2 stories2 generations2 families2 sets of values1 outsider that disrupts it allno mothersno fathers
  • 18. 18nov 15­19.51
  • 19. 19nov 15­20.09WUTHERING HEIGHTS AS SOCIO­ECONOMIC NOVEL
  • 20. 20nov 15­20.09THEMES IN WUTHERING HEIGHTS
  • 21. 21nov 15­20.10PSYCHOLOGICAL INTERPRETATIONS OF WUTHERING HEIGHTS
  • 22. 22nov 15­20.16Bildungsroman or not bildungsroman?THE VICTORIAN BILDUNGSROMAN:TOWARDS A FICTIONAL TYPOLOGY 
  • 23. 23nov 17­13.37Chronology
  • 24. 24nov 17­14.29The Novel as a WholeThere are hundreds of approaches you can take to analyze the novel as a whole; for instance, You can choose to analyze         the characters (their differences and reasons for their conflicts);        compare the two families and their family traits and then the two generations (see Parallel Characters for example);        Heathcliff as a Satanic Hero or symbol of natural energy;        the narrators (their functions, and their differences from the protagonists),        the use of narrative frames, and the other structural elements such as echoes and repetition;        the major motifs of             sickness and death (& responses to it);            the function of the past as memories and inheritance;             books and learning;         the Gothic elements of ghost, storm, nightmare, etc.;        the nature imagery and the other symbols such as window and mirror, dogs and animals;        the interaction between landscape and characters;        the theme of Romantic Passion, the ideas of oneness and Liebestod (love­death),  and how Romantic Passion gets "domesticated";        the theme of revenge (see a student paper as an example): what does Heathcliff want specifically?  How is his way of revenge different from Hindleys or Isabellas?        the more "Victorian" issues of names (e.g. Catherine IIs full name is Catherine Linton Heathcliff Earnshaw), class, property and inheritance.  (See Emily Brontes Wuthering Heights: Romantic or Victorian for example.)    In Wuthering Heights scholarship, there are some classical approaches.  You can get a brief introduction to some from Wuthering Heights : a summary of three different interpretations.    Also, there are some approaches that involve critical theories; for instance,         there is one example of psychoanalytic approach here.         If you want to take a sociological/Marxist approach, the  Wuthering Heights homepage will be very helpful.        Also, its interesting to talk about your responses as a reader (reader response approach).   See And The Intended Audience Is...(drum role!) for some reflections on the intended audience.    From the relevant links section of this page, you can get to read some more papers ( mostly students work but some very good). 
  • 25. 25nov 17­14.32
  • 26. 26nov 17­14.33    black line: son or daughter of; if dotted it means adoption    red line: wedding; if double it means second wedding    pink line: love    blue line: affection    green line: hate    light yellow area: active heroes    violet area: external observers
  • 27. 27nov 17­14.38
  • 28. 28nov 17­14.59
  • 29. Allegatigenealogy­colour­print.pdfGender_and_Genre.pdfvictoriansoverview­1.pptwh­introduction.pptWuthering Hights 2.pptwutheringheightslec12009.ppt2009wh3overheads.doc2009whoheadslecture 4.doc2009wuthering heightslectureohead2.docEmily Brontë.docxCHAPTER IX.docxchronology_of_wuthering_heights.pdf