Renaissance Medicine
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Renaissance Medicine

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Renaissance Medicine Renaissance Medicine Presentation Transcript

  • Renaissance Medicine Dominic Franco Per.1 12/7/09
  • Surgery
    • Arabic pharmaceutical practices were studied and improved, and medicines--like laudanum--were developed to stop or reduce pain.  Some doctors began to investigate the spread of infectious diseases.
    • Surgical procedures were also modernized, many as the  direct result of battlefield experiences.  Surgeons began to experiment with ways to ease the suffering of their patients. 
    • Amboise Pare revolutionized surgery when he began to use ligatures to stop bleeding wounds instead of cauterizing them with boiling oil or red-hot pokers
    • loyn, h r. The middle ages
  • Daily life
    • Vitamins were discovered and their importance to health recognized.  New drugs, including digitalis, were developed, and vaccination was perfected by Edward Jenner.  Giovanni B Margagni founded pathologic anatomy, and Marie Francois Bichat created the field of histology. 
    • Still, many of the old practices, like bleeding, continued, and several new and dangerous treatment theories, like homeopathy, flourished for periods of time. 
    • They kept learning and kept making mistakes but never stopped and gave up just kept trying and trying.
    • loyn, h r. The middle ages
  • Dissection
    • Vesalius successfully challenged the general ban on dissection by the church, which had arisen from the religious belief that to cut up a dead body was sacrilegious
    • The only dissections that had been permissible were those undertaken on the corpses of criminals as part of their punishment, and these had been carried out purely to support Galen's theories
    • The tradition that dissection should only be done while a professor read aloud the theories of Galen was dropped. In the pioneering atmosphere of the Renaissance, dissection was accepted as a means to develop new ideas and explain these to students.
    • singman, Jeffrey l. Daily life in medieval Europe . N.p.: n.p., n.d. Print.
  • Researchers
    • Professional societies were formed in all major European capitals, and scientists shared their research by publishing in journals.
    • Medical researchers made some astounding discoveries.  William Harvey determined how blood circulated through the body. 
    • Anton van Leeuwenhoek used a microscope and discovered red blood cells, bacteria, and protozoa. Edward Jenner invented vaccination after discovering the relationship between cowpox and smallpox.
    • David. Encyclopedia of Renaissance
  • Thomas Sydenham
    • Clinical practice was revolutionized by Thomas Sydenham who developed a treatment procedure that recognized the importance of environmental considerations and included careful, detailed observation and record keeping.
    • Vitamins were discovered and their importance to health recognized.  New drugs, including digitalis, were developed, and vaccination was perfected by Edward Jenner.  Giovanni B Margagni founded pathologic anatomy, and Marie Francois Bichat created the field of histology. 
    • Still, many of the old practices, like bleeding, continued, and several new and dangerous treatment theories, like homeopathy, flourished for periods of time. 
    • http://library.thinkquest.org/15569/hist-8.html
  • Medicine pratice
    • As the practice of medicine became more professional, many folk healers were prohibited, and male obstetricians began to replace traditional midwives. 
    • Instead of applying traditional treatments without question, doctors came up with new practices based on experimentation
    • Pare a French military surgeon, introduced modern principles to the treatment of wounds
    • http:// encyclopedia.farlex.com/Renaissance+medicine
  • Pare
    • He rejected the old method of treating gunshot wounds or amputations by cauterization as unnecessarily painful and likely to lead to infection or death
    • Paré developed the use of ligatures, in which he sealed wounds by sewing up the veins with silk thread rather than applying boiling oil or a hot iron
    • Paré also used a mixture of rose oil, egg yolk, and turpentine to soothe and heal exposed flesh wounds
    • http://science.jrank.org/pages/10140/Medicine-in-Europe-United-States-Renaissance-Medicine.html
  • Church Vs. Medicine
    • The Catholic Church in Europe continued to promote Galen's anatomical ideas as infallible
    • And its control over medical practice and training in the universities remained strong, hindering progress.
    • However, as the Renaissance in learning took hold in Europe, and inventions such as the microscope appeared, leading doctors began to investigate the anatomy and physiology of the body
    • http://library.thinkquest.org/15569/hist-8.html
    • singman, Jeffrey l. Daily life in medieval Europe . N.p.: n.p., n.d. Print.
    • loyn, h r. The middle ages . N.p.: n.p., n.d. Print.
    • rundle, David. Encyclopedia of Renaissance rundle, David. Encyclopedia of Renaissance . N.p.: n.p., n.d. Print
    • http://library.thinkquest.org/15569/hist-8.html
    • http:// encyclopedia.farlex.com/Renaissance+medicine
    • http://science.jrank.org/pages/10140/Medicine-in-Europe-United-States-Renaissance-Medicine.html