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Nike Is Bad
Nike Is Bad
Nike Is Bad
Nike Is Bad
Nike Is Bad
Nike Is Bad
Nike Is Bad
Nike Is Bad
Nike Is Bad
Nike Is Bad
Nike Is Bad
Nike Is Bad
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Nike Is Bad

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nike is bad

nike is bad

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Transcript

  • 1. Nike: Just Don’t Do It By: Charlie
  • 2. My Position
    • Nike is a major shoe company who is taking advantage of countries poverty. Though Nike preaches the badness of sweatshops, they continue to exploit them in developing countries.
  • 3. Nike
    • Nike is an International Corporation
    • They make a variety of athletic wear from shoes to hats and everything in between.
    • They are an American based company, but make there products in sweatshops in other countries.
  • 4. Children Working in a Nike Sweatshops
    • In many Nike Sweatshops, they make use of child labor.
    • The boy you see on the left is only 8 years old and he is being forced to work a 9 hour work day.
  • 5. Child Labor Laws
    • Child Labor laws are very lenient in most of the countries that Nike has sweatshops in.
    • Nike is currently working with these developing nations to make there child labor laws more strict.
  • 6. Where most of Nike Sweatshops are Located
    • South Korea
    • Taiwan
    • China
    • Indonesia
    • Vietnam
  • 7. China and Vietnam
    • In China and Vietnam Employees are prohibited from making independent trade unions.
    • This is a big plus for Nike because there are no organized groups to strike or fight for more rights in the workplace.
  • 8. History of Nike Sweatshops
    • The majority of the Sweatshops were started around 1970. They were located in South Korea and Taiwan.
    • In these countries workers were slowly gaining the right to organize and wages were raised.
  • 9. History of Nike Sweatshops Cont.
    • When the workers started getting better wages, Nike decided to look for new places to build sweatshops.
    • These places were China and Vietnam. These two countries were perfect because of there relaxed labor laws.
  • 10. Protests Against Nike
    • A large amount of people are against Nike’s sweatshops.
    • The largest protest would probably the “Boycott Nike” protest. They are trying to get star atheletes to stop using Nike products
  • 11. Summary of Video
    • All of the pictures and statistics in the video ARE real.
    • Young children and adults are being exploited just to make some sneakers.
    • I hope this presentation has made you think differently about the shoes you where.
  • 12. WORKS CITED
    • Boycott Nike. (2005). Saigon. Retrieved March 26, 2008, from http://www.saigon.com/~nike/
    • Nike Campaign. (2007, October 29). Global Exchange. Retrieved March 26, 2008, from
    • http://www.globalexchange.org/campaigns/sweatshops/nike/
    • Nike's New Game Plan for Sweatshops. (2004). BusinessWeek.
    • Retrieved March 26, 2008, from
    • http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/04_ 38/b3900011_mz001.h
    • Peretti, J. (2008). My Nike Media Invention. In The Nation. Retrieved March 27, 2008, from http://www.thenation.com/doc/20010409/peretti

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