THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND 
                    IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES 
                  SUPPOR...
THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND 
THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES 


INTRODUCTION 
Due to recognition of th...
THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND 
THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES 



                                     ...
THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND 
THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES 


 
It should be noted that the research...
THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND 
THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES 


 
This  information,  when  coupled  w...
THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND 
THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES 


 
Michigan law provides procedures for...
THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND 
THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES 


answers the first question.  A review ...
THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND 
THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES 


The second step is to conduct a demogr...
THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND 
THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES 


This leads to closing existing facilit...
THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND 
THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES 




                              TABLE ...
THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND 
THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES 


                                TABLE ...
THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND 
THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES 


COST TO MOTHBALL A FACILITY 
Data in T...
THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND 
THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES 


This analysis is based on the followin...
THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND 
THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES 


 
           TABLE 4 ‐ ANNUAL MAINTENA...
THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND 
THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES 


 
One  aspect  of  mothballing  a  bui...
THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND 
THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES 


 


                          TABLE ‐ ...
THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND 
THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES 


over  the  next  20  years  at  a  rat...
THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND 
THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES 


graph) continues unchanged throughout ...
THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND 
THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES 


the  associated  impact  on  migration...
THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND 
THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES 


facilities for future reuse with retai...
THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND 
THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES 


                                      ...
THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND 
THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES 


3.     Removal/closure  of  a  school ...
THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND 
THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES 


 
While financial analysis is importan...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

MI School Demographics And Facilities

273

Published on

ANALYSIS OF STUDENTN POPULATION DECLINE AND IMPACT UPON SCHOOL DISTRICTS

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
273
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

MI School Demographics And Facilities

  1. 1. THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND  IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES  SUPPORTING K‐12 EDUCATION IN MICHIGAN    A presentation to the    Michigan State University Land Policy Institute  Building Michigan Prosperity Network  Annual Land and Prosperity Summit  April 14, 200    By  Charles R. Eckenstahler and Carl H. Baxmeyer    ABSTRACT   Michigan’s student aged (5-17) population is expected to decrease by 7.6% during period of 2000 to 2030 resulting in excess educational facilities, estimated to be in excess of 6,000 classrooms. Due to economic concerns, school districts will consider school district consolidation, reuse/repurpose of existing facilities, closing and “mothballing” of facilities for future reuse, and closure and disposal of faculties to balance the capacity of school facilities with the current and future projected student enrollment or “right-size” school district facilities. The decision making process to determine this “right-size” strategy involves 1) an assessment of facilities, 2) a demographic study, 3) a process of community engagement and 4) a “citizen led” and “community driven” implementation effort. Based on data for 22 Michigan schools located three divergent school districts, urban, suburban and rural, standardized cost ratios were determined These include 1) current cost to maintain facilities, 2) cost to close, mothball and maintain facilities for reuse and 3) cost to close, demolish and school facilities. Using the decreasing statewide demographic projection, a financial analysis was completed projecting the 20-year cost to 1) maintain current building capacity, 2) closing and mothballing facilities for a “right-sized” facility capacity and 3) closing and disposal of facilities to yield a “right-sized” facility capacity. - 1-
  2. 2. THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND  THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES  INTRODUCTION  Due to recognition of the relationship of schools to the social and economic well-being of any community, significant civic and social implications of the “right-sizing” process are identified. Current and future demographic changes, specifically the loss of student aged children will  have  an  impact  upon  the  financial  ability  of  school  districts  to  maintain  and  refurbish  existing educational facilities or construct new educational facilities in the future.  In the  immediate future, it will also limit the ability of local school districts to fund state of the art  educational facilities with leading technology necessary to easily develop student skills for  employment in a globally competitive work force.    This goal of this paper to uncover and document the unfolding problem of excess physical  facilities due to loss of student aged population.  The loss of students results in certain  school districts receiving less per student state aid.  Due to this long‐term decline of student  enrollment, school districts will be required to analyze whether to maintain underutilized  facilities, repurpose the buildings for other uses, sell or demolish excess building capacity  or mothball the building for future use.    This paper is designed to analyze student aged population growth trends in Michigan to  quantify education building capacity requirements for the future based on current and  future projected K‐12 student aged population.  This analysis will by information gathered  from sample school districts, investigate the ability of school districts maintain their current  educational facilities, in light of decreased student enrollment.      The analysis will proceed with investigation of alternative facility management solutions,  including disposition of unneeded facilities, repurposing current facilities, consolidation of  special  facilities,  and  construction  of  new  facilities  in  an  effort  to  reduce  long‐term  educational facility operation and maintenance costs.    MICHIGAN K‐12 POPULATION DEMOGRAPHICS AND THE  EFFECT ON MICHIGAN CLASSROOM COUNT  While Michigan’s overall statewide population is expected to increase by 7.6% during the  period of 2000 to 2030, the number of school‐age (5‐17) children is expected to decrease  significantly by 151,227 students.  Michigan’s 7.9% decrease compares to a 15.7% national  increase for the same period.  These trends are shown in Graph 1.  Clearly, over the thirty  - 2-
  3. 3. THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND  THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES  Graph 1. Michigan and U.S. Population (2000 to 2030) 1,000,000,000 100,000,000 10,000,000 1,000,000 0 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 MI School Age (5-17) MI Total US School Age (5-17) US Total (30) year period of the logarithmic graph there appears to be no dramatic shifts.  The U.S.  total and school age populations increase; the total Michigan population increases slightly;  and, the Michigan school age children drops then rebounds slightly.     However,  upon  closer  examination  the  impact  of  changing  demographics  is  easier  to  appreciate.  Graph 2, while it has an exaggerated vertical y‐axis for the sake of clarity,  clearly shows how the Michigan school age population is expected to change over the  period ending in 2030.     Analysis of this demographic trend shows that 142 school districts will loose from 10% to  15% of their student enrollment, 97 will loose between 16 to 25% and 21 will loose from  26% to 50%. Assuming each classroom has an average of 25 students, the loss of 151,227  students indicates an excess of 6,000 classrooms in the total statewide educational facility  inventory.  (See  related  article:  Is  Your  Community  Ready  to  Address  Excess  School  Facilities? Planning and Zoning News, January 2009)  - 3-
  4. 4. THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND  THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES    It should be noted that the research for this paper and the author’s related article as well as  the demographic projections by the U.S. Census Bureau, were conducted prior to the full  Graph 2. Estimated and Projected School Age (5-17) Children - State of Michigan (2000 to 2030) 1,950,000 1,900,000 1,850,000 1,800,000 1,750,000 1,700,000 1,650,000 00 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 MI School Age (5-17)   effect of the current economic recession.  A current assignment with the Detroit Public  Schools  has  identified  a  significant  acceleration  of  the  decline  of  the  K‐12  student  population.  This is a trend that may be occurring in other Michigan school districts as  residents  cope  with  changing  economics  and,  a  considerable  loss  of  employment  opportunities.      Detroit Public Schools have experienced a loss of 70,000 students in the past seven (7) years.  This is not entirely a loss of students from the area.  Many students have transferred to  charter  schools  and  some  have  enrolled  in  surrounding  suburban  school  districts.   However, our research to date indicates that there has been significant out‐migration to  other out‐of‐state locations primarily to seek employment.   - 4-
  5. 5. THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND  THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES    This  information,  when  coupled  with  anecdotal  evidence  from  two  major  moving  companies indicating that for every household they move into Michigan two households  leave  the  state,  suggests  that  the  projected  150,000  loss  of  school  age  children  may  be  conservative.  Clearly, Michigan school districts will face a significant challenge in the years  ahead.    MICHIGAN SCHOOL AID FUNDING FORMULA  Education funding is governed by the State Aid to School Act. P.A. 94 of 1979, as amended.  Essentially,  the  legislation  provides  state  funding  on  a  per  student  formula  for  K‐12  schools.  Currently this per student state aid is approximately $7,200 per student.  There are  several adjustment factors in this funding formula to compensate or equalize school district  state aid for unique circumstances including declining enrollment.    Data collected in this investigation disclosed that, on the average, it costs $1,263 dollars per  student to maintain the physical school building; or 17.5% of the annual per student aid  provided by the State of Michigan School aid funding formula.     It is easy to realize the impact of declining enrollment results in a direct loss of state aid.   The resultant economic impact to school operations is the continuation of facility operating  cost in light of a decrease in state school funding due to decreased student population.    RIGHT‐SIZING MICHIGAN SCHOOL DISTRICTS  We hold the position that due to the declining student population trends, Michigan school  districts will be drawn to increased study of the economics of school facility operations in  effort  to  maintain  school  district  identity  and  facilities.    This  will  ultimately  include  balancing physical facility capacity with the decline (or growth) of student population to  offer a full complement of educational opportunities.    Right‐sizing school districts may include consideration of consolidation with neighboring  school  districts  to  achieve  the  critical  student  population  needed  for  optimization  of  financial operations (See: School District Consolidation, Size and Spending; an Evaluation,  Andrew J. Coulson, Mackinac Center for Public Policy, 2007)  - 5-
  6. 6. THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND  THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES    Michigan law provides procedures for the consolidation of school districts. Specifically,  efforts to initiate any consolidation effort first must start by a decision of the local school  boards.  Neither the Michigan Department of Education nor the State Board of Education  may supersede the local board’s authority.  Therefore, to initiate a consolidation strategy  both local school boards must agree.    It is important to recognize that the electors of each school district must eventually approve  the consolidation, upon petition of 5% of the electors requesting the ballot initiative.  Also,  the matter of existing debt must be addressed.  Provisions in the law provide assumption of  debt and  the establishment of a special taxing provision imposing taxes upon only the  portion of the consolidated school district for which the debt was originally incurred. This  provides assurance that no‐one pays for debt that was not their responsibility.    In our opinion, the consideration of consolidation may be a first step in the process of right‐ sizing for some districts.  Whether consolidation is an option or not school districts need to  follow a process to right‐size their facilities.  To the public right‐sizing appears to be a  simple matter.  The lay‐person simply sees the number of children; looks at the size of the  schools; and, selects a school to close…right‐sizing completed.  In actuality the process is  not that simple.  The number of students, the size of the buildings and the curriculum being  taught  may  not  simply  allow  one  to  be  incorporated  into  the  other.   Right‐sizing may  require the construction of additions to facilities at optimum locations; repurposing of  existing facilities; “mothballing” buildings for reuse at a future date; and, the disposal of  excess assets.    As districts wrestle with the impact of declining enrollments, shrinking financial resources  and having the appropriate assets in terms of land and buildings to meet their educational  goals  right‐sizing  becomes  a  priority.    It  is  important  to  understand  the  process  and  ramifications associated with right‐sizing.  This paper and presentation seeks to illustrate a  process for right‐sizing and the challenges and opportunities the process affords.    A PROCESS FOR RIGHT‐SIZING  Right‐sizing means matching the physical facilities of the school district with the student  needs.  The needs are defined as both the number of students to be educated in addition to  the educational adequacy of  the building  spaces provided.  A demographic projection  - 6-
  7. 7. THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND  THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES  answers the first question.  A review of school district physical facilities needed to house  the curriculum and educational specifications addresses the latter.  For example a district  changing its curriculum by moving to all‐day Kindergarten will require additional space as  defined by its educational specifications for Kindergarten classrooms.      There are four steps to the process of right‐sizing, beginning with an assessment of the  facilities as shown in the following chart.  Each building needs to be assessed in terms of  both  physical  and  educational  adequacy.    Does  the  building  meet  code?    Are  there  maintenance issues that need to be addressed? Does the building provide a proper learning  environment in terms of daylighting, thermal comfort and ventilation?  These are but a few       of the physical assessment questions that need to be answered.      It is also essential that the educational adequacy of the building be assessed.  How well  does the building support the educational curriculum?  Are the spaces appropriate for  current and future education?  1. Assess the Facilities • Physical adequacy • Educational adequacy Strategic Plan Needs Assessment 2. Demographic Study • Projected future enrollment • Location determination 3. Community Engagement • Understand needs • Develop alternatives • Recommend to the Board 4. Implementation Excess Facility Capacity • Approve the plan • Arrange financing • Implement the selected alternative(s)   - 7-
  8. 8. THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND  THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES  The second step is to conduct a demographic study.  This detailed study provides not only  the projected enrollment but the probable home location throughout the district of future  students.  How many students can the district expect to educate and where those students  will reside relative to the existing educational facilities are two of the questions that the  demographic study seeks to answers.    Combined  together,  the  facility  assessment  and  the  demographic  study  form  a  needs  assessment.  Our experience shows that at this stage of the assessment it is essential to  engage  the  community  in  the  process.    Taking  the  needs  assessment  to  the  residents  provides the opportunity to educate citizens about the needs of the district while receiving,  in  turn,  essential  input  from  the  community.    The  expected  outcome  is  a  long‐range  strategic plan that addresses the needs while providing action recommendations designed  to address those needs.  The long‐range strategic plan offers options and recommendations,  to right‐size school education facilities.      Note that the process results, at the end of step 3, in the recommendation of a strategic plan  to the board of education.  The best plans are those which we refer to as “citizen led and  community driven”.  By involving the public in the process the plan becomes a “citizen  plan” in which the stakeholders of the community have a vested interest.      Upon receiving the recommendations it remains the responsibility of the school board to  approve  a  plan  consisting  of  the  selected  recommendations;  arrange  financing;  and,  implement the selected alternatives.  This leaves the ultimate decision making authority in  the hands of the appropriate individuals…those persons elected to the school board to  represent the public.    For Michigan school districts with declining enrollment and projected future reductions in  the number of students it is likely that excess facility capacity will be identified. We believe  it is logical for these school districts to close a significant number of facilities, especially the  older more costly to operate facilities.  In some school districts certain facilities can be  “mothballed” and maintained for reuse in the future when student population growth  requires additional facilities.    It is also reasonable to assume that new strategies emerging from this process will seek to  “optimize” the location of schools to be consistent with population growth projections.   - 8-
  9. 9. THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND  THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES  This leads to closing existing facilities in favor of new facilities constructed with better  physical  and  educational  characteristics  and  less  operational  expense.    Typically  these  schools will be at optimum locations that also decrease transportation costs for the district.      SCHOOL FACILITY OPERATIONS COST ANALYSIS    With an understanding that school districts will be challenged with the task of determining  cost effective means to match the supply of building facilities with the projected student  population,  the  authors  sought  to  gather  data  to  help  determine  cost  saving  from  alternative long‐term facility management strategies.  With this information, the data can  be employed to project facility costs, for projected future student populations.    Data  for  twenty‐two  (22)  school  facilities  were  gathered  from  three  (3)  independent,  geographically disbursed districts.  These included an urban district; a suburban district;  and a small‐town rural district. The building size, student capacity and the square foot per  student information is displayed in Table 1.  The data represent 1.6 million square feet of  education building space having capacity for 10,300 students.  We selected these data to  provide information that can be used to develop financial comparative statewide indicators  for use in financial modeling.    TABLE ‐ 1  SAMPLE DATA          Square  Student  School  Footage  Capacity  SF/Student  1  156,000  975  160  2  49,930  355  141  3  93,521  520  180  4  54,174  340  159  5  63,374  420  151  6  35,500  235  151  7  50,508  360  140  8  170,870  1,140  150  9  37,198  265  140  10  257,392  1,430  180  - 9-
  10. 10. THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND  THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES  TABLE ‐ 1  SAMPLE DATA (con’t)  11  47,264  340  139  12  30,191  215  140  13  58,368  415  141  14  48,918  350  140  15  30,689  220  139  16  62,168  445  140  17  12,400  90  138  18  43,664  290  151  19  62,240  445  140  20  53,356  355  150  21  77,975  557  140  22  85,064  608  140  TOTAL  1,580,763  10,370    AVERAGE  71,853  471  148  MEDIAN  53,765  358  141    For the purposes of establishing comparative indicators for analysis, we calculated the  average and median values for each data set.  Thus the average size of the building is  71,853 square feet with a capacity for 471 students.      Data in Table 2 shows the annual cost of operation, excluding teaching salaries, for the each  of the sample buildings.  Using these data the average facility operating cost is $7.64 per  square feet of building space or about $1,174 per student.    - 10-
  11. 11. THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND  THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES  TABLE 2 ‐ CURRENT BUILDING OPERATING COSTS EXCLUSIVE OF TEACHING SALARIES    Total  Staffing:  Total  Total  Annual  Principal  Staffing:  Envir.  Annual  Annual  Operating  and  Custodians  Maint. and  Health &  Operating  Operating  Cost /  School  Admin.  & Engineers  Insurance  Utilities  Supplies  Safety  Costs  Cost/SF  Student  1  $411,260  $295,000  $49,612  $248,725  $20,617  $5,470  $1,030,684  $6.61  $1,057  2  $225,796  $150,000  $19,953  $73,827  $11,360  $5,873  $486,808  $9.75  $1,371  3  $222,159  $295,000  $29,742  $142,510  $12,585  $3,766  $705,762  $7.55  $1,357  4  $170,016  $295,000  $17,229  $109,710  $11,484  $5,971  $609,410  $11.25  $1,792  5  $133,950  $150,000  $23,549  $112,560  $8,751  $3,833  $432,643  $6.83  $1,030  6  $176,825  $150,000  $10,654  $72,285  $8,192  $4,284  $422,240  $11.89  $1,797  7  $169,412  $150,000  $15,522  $59,619  $9,069  $5,030  $408,652  $8.09  $1,135  8  $178,600  $295,000  $54,341  $274,315  $24,042  $5,332  $831,630  $4.87  $729  9  $179,432  $150,000  $11,830  $85,587  $9,295  $3,874  $440,018  $11.83  $1,660  10  $432,680  $485,000  $81,857  $528,329  $27,302  $10,012  $1,565,180  $6.08  $1,095  11  $177,509  $150,000  $15,031  $77,895  $9,545  $4,386  $434,366  $9.19  $1,278  12  $121,906  $150,000  $9,601  $56,120  $6,896  $4,930  $349,453  $11.57  $1,625  13  $225,325  $150,000  $18,560  $81,230  $13,979  $6,895  $495,989  $8.50  $1,195  14  $89,300  $150,000  $15,557  $8,327  $10,111  $3,490  $276,785  $5.66  $791  15  $161,570  $150,000  $8,011  $54,883  $5,737  $4,571  $384,771  $12.54  $1,749  16  $224,082  $150,000  $19,770  $92,685  $14,383  $5,782  $506,702  $8.15  $1,139  17  $44,650  $105,000  $3,943  $18,548  $5,119  $3,833  $181,094  $14.60  $2,012  18  $170,328  $150,000  $13,886  $112,175  $11,004  $4,750  $462,143  $10.58  $1,594  19  $89,300  $150,000  $19,794  $131,525  $7,286  $3,586  $401,491  $6.45  $902  20  $170,328  $150,000  $14,524  $60,530  $8,739  $3,533  $407,655  $7.64  $1,148  21  $132,105  $135,450  $11,324  $102,059  $10,009  $4,216  $395,163  $5.07  $709  22  $118,894  $121,905  $12,457  $108,062  $10,597  $4,464  $376,380  $4.42  $619  TOTAL  $4,025,427  $4,127,355  $476,746  $2,611,505  $256,102  $107,882  $11,605,018      AVERAGE  $182,974  $187,607  $21,670  $118,705  $11,641  $4,904  $527,501  $8.60  $1,263  MEDIAN  $170,328  $150,000  $15,540  $89,136  $10,060  $4,517  $433,505  $8.12  $1,172    - 11-
  12. 12. THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND  THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES  COST TO MOTHBALL A FACILITY  Data in Table 3 shows the cost to close and mothball a building for reuse at a future date.   Using these data, mothballing costs $6.13 per square foot or $903 per student (based on the  student capacity) for the average building.    TABLE 3 ‐ ESTIMATED COST TO MOTHBALL BUILDINGS    Waste  Cost to  Decommission Disposal  Total Cost  Cost to  Mothball  Emptying  And  Public Safety to  Mothball  per  School  Building  Secure  Insurance  Misc.  Mothball  per sq. ft.  Student  1  $468,000  $259,000  $24,806  $88,587  $840,393  $5.39  $862  2  $188,220  $109,110  $9,976  $69,553  $376,860  $7.55  $1,062  3  $280,563  $155,282  $14,871  $82,327  $533,042  $5.70  $1,025  4  $162,522  $96,261  $8,614  $78,781  $346,179  $6.39  $1,018  5  $222,144  $126,072  $11,775  $80,572  $440,563  $6.95  $1,049  6  $100,500  $65,250  $5,327  $77,919  $248,995  $7.01  $1,060  7  $146,424  $88,212  $7,761  $68,298  $310,695  $6.15  $863  8  $512,610  $281,305  $27,170  $80,177  $901,262  $5.27  $791  9  $111,594  $70,797  $5,915  $67,252  $255,558  $6.87  $964  10  $772,176  $416,088  $40,928  $129,593  $1,358,785  $5.28  $950  11  $141,792  $85,896  $7,516  $68,159  $303,362  $6.42  $892  12  $90,573  $60,287  $4,801  $66,620  $222,281  $7.36  $1,034  13  $175,080  $102,540  $9,280  $69,159  $356,059  $6.10  $858  14  $146,754  $88,377  $7,779  $68,308  $311,217  $6.36  $889  15  $75,567  $47,784  $4,005  $66,170  $193,526  $6.31  $880  16  $186,498  $108,249  $9,885  $69,702  $374,334  $6.02  $841  17  $37,200  $23,600  $1,972  $32,417  $95,189  $7.68  $1,058  18  $130,992  $80,496  $6,943  $77,834  $296,266  $6.79  $1,022  19  $186,720  $108,360  $9,897  $69,508  $374,485  $6.02  $842  20  $137,010  $83,505  $7,262  $78,015  $305,792  $5.73  $861  21  $149,553  $85,976  $7,927  $52,113  $295,569  $3.79  $531  22  $160,235  $92,118  $8,493  $55,836  $316,682  $3.72  $521  TOTAL  $4,582,727  $2,634,564  $242,903  $1,596,899  $9,057,093      AVERAG E  $208,306  $119,753  $11,041  $72,586  $411,686  $6.13  $903  MEDIAN  $154,894  $90,247  $8,210  $69,531  $313,949  $6.23  $891    - 12-
  13. 13. THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND  THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES  This analysis is based on the following assumptions:    • Emptying  the  building:  Includes  removal  of  all  furniture,  supplies  and  equipment.  • Decommissioning  and  securing:  Includes  securing  the  building  from  vandalism, rodent infestation, weatherization, and insuring operation of the  HVAC system to provide a minimal amount of heat to prevent pipes from  freezing during winter months.  • Insurance:  Represents the cost for property and casualty insurance for a  vacant building and grounds.  • Waste  disposal,  public  safety  and  miscellaneous:  Includes  the  cost  to  dispose  of  unwanted  materials,  security  during  closing  process,  and  any  other costs not elsewhere recorded.    ON‐GOING COST OF MAINTAINING AND MOTHBALLED BUILDING  Data in Table 4 shows the ongoing annual maintenance cost for each building mothballed  with the intent to be reactivated at a later date.   Using this data we have determined this  average annual cost to be $0.60 per square foot or $88 per student.    TABLE 4 ‐ ANNUAL MAINTENANCE COST FOR MOTHBALLED BUILDING    On‐ On‐ Going  Security  Total  Going  Cost to  and  Annual  Cost to  Mothball  Minimal  Operating  Mothball  / Student  School  Insurance  Utilities  Maintenance  Costs  / sq. ft.  Capacity  1  $24,806  $58,500  $5,029  $88,335  $0.57  $91  2  $9,976  $23,528  $2,715  $36,219  $0.73  $102  3  $14,871  $35,070  $3,021  $52,963  $0.57  $102  4  $8,614  $20,315  $2,746  $31,676  $0.58  $93  5  $11,775  $27,768  $2,063  $41,605  $0.66  $99  6  $5,327  $12,563  $1,923  $19,812  $0.56  $84  7  $7,761  $18,303  $2,142  $28,206  $0.56  $78  8  $27,170  $64,076  $5,886  $97,132  $0.57  $85  - 13-
  14. 14. THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND  THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES    TABLE 4 ‐ ANNUAL MAINTENANCE COST FOR MOTHBALLED BUILDING    On‐ On‐ Going  Security  Total  Going  Cost to  and  Annual  Cost to  Mothball  Minimal  Operating  Mothball  / Student  School  Insurance  Utilities  Maintenance  Costs  / sq. ft.  Capacity  9  $5,915  $13,949  $2,199  $22,063  $0.59  $83  10  $40,928  $96,522  $6,701  $144,151  $0.56  $101  11  $7,516  $17,724  $2,261  $27,501  $0.58  $81  12  $4,801  $11,322  $1,599  $17,721  $0.59  $82  13  $9,280  $21,885  $3,370  $34,535  $0.59  $83  14  $7,779  $18,344  $2,403  $28,526  $0.58  $82  15  $4,005  $9,446  $1,309  $14,760  $0.48  $67  16  $9,885  $23,312  $3,471  $36,668  $0.59  $82  17  $1,972  $4,650  $1,155  $7,776  $0.63  $86  18  $6,943  $16,374  $2,626  $25,943  $0.59  $89  19  $9,897  $23,340  $1,697  $34,933  $0.56  $79  20  $7,262  $17,126  $2,060  $26,448  $0.50  $75  21  $7,927  $52,113  $1,691  $61,731  $0.79  $111  22  $8,493  $55,836  $2,114  $66,443  $0.78  $109  TOTAL  $242,903  $642,066  $60,179  $945,148      AVERAGE  $11,041  $29,185  $2,735  $42,961  $0.60  $88  MEDIAN  $16,649  $57,168  $3,572  $77,389  $0.67  $100    The assumptions employed include:  • Insurance:    Maintaining  property  and  casualty  insurance  for  the  vacant  building  • Security  and  minimal  utilities:  Use  of  periodic  security  inspections  including replacing any security materials lost to vandalism and the minimal  operation  of  the  HVAC  system  to  maintain  integrity  of  interior  building  surfaces, etc.  • Maintenance: The cost of having district maintenance personnel, or contract  personnel,  make  occasional  repairs  to  the  building  systems  including  maintaining the security system, exterior lighting and HVAC system.  - 14-
  15. 15. THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND  THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES    One  aspect  of  mothballing  a  building  that  should  not  be  minimized  is the  prospect  of  “urban miners” stripping assets from the building.  This is more than juvenile vandalism.   So‐called  “urban  miners”  are  actually  organized  thieves  who  break  into  a  mothballed  building  and  systematically  remove  wire,  lights,  plumbing  fixtures  and  any  other  marketable materials from the structure.  They leave behind a stripped shell of a building  that is virtually useless as a re‐deployable asset from a physical and financial standpoint.   While  typically  this  occurs  in  more  urban  areas  in  actuality  no  mothballed  school,  particularly during periods of high scrap prices, is immune to urban mining.  Districts need  to recognize this and allocate sufficient financial resources for security measures.     COST TO DEMOLISH A BUILDING  Data in Table 5 shows the one‐time cost to demolish each building.  Using these data yields  a  one‐time  cost  to  demolish  the  average  building  of  $4.82  per  square  foot  or  $713  per  student.  Note  that  this  cost  does  not  include  any  environmental  remediation  expense.   Depending upon the condition of the building environmentally remediation, primarily  asbestos removal and disposal, can double the cost of demolition.  That cost is not included  since over the years so many buildings have already had asbestos removal.    In addition this cost, more than others, seems to vary depending upon location.  The cost of  $4.82  per  square  foot  is  common  in  urban  areas.    However,  the  cost  can  dramatically  decrease to $3.00 per square foot in more rural areas.    TABLE ‐ 5  COST TO DEMOLISH A BUILDING  Demo  Demo  Total  Square  Student  Cost per  Cost  per  Demolition  School  Footage  Capacity  S.F.  Student  Cost  1  156,000  975  $5.00  $800  $780,000  2  49,930  355  $5.00  $703  $249,650  3  93,521  520  $5.00  $899  $467,605  4  54,174  340  $5.00  $797  $270,870  5  63,374  420  $5.00  $754  $316,870  6  35,500  235  $5.00  $755  $177,500  7  50,508  360  $5.00  $702  $252,540  8  170,870  1,140  $5.00  $749  $854,350  9  37,198  265  $5.00  $702  $185,990  - 15-
  16. 16. THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND  THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES    TABLE ‐ 5  COST TO DEMOLISH A BUILDING (con’t)  10  257,392  1,430  $5.00  $900  $1,286,960  11  47,264  340  $5.00  $695  $236,320  12  30,191  215  $5.00  $702  $150,955  13  58,368  415  $5.00  $703  $291,840  14  48,918  350  $5.00  $699  $244,590  15  30,689  220  $5.00  $697  $153,445  16  62,168  445  $5.00  $699  $310,840  17  12,400  90  $5.00  $689  $62,000  18  43,664  290  $5.00  $753  $218,320  19  62,240  445  $5.00  $699  $311,200  20  53,356  355  $5.00  $751  $266,780  21  77,975  557  $3.00  $420  $233,925  22  85,064  608  $3.00  $420  $255,191  TOTAL  1,580,763  10,370      $7,577,740  AVERAG E  71,853  471  $4.82  $713  $344,443  MEDIAN  53,765  358  $5.00  $703  $253,865    It should be noted that the impact of recycling salvageable materials from the structure has  not been factored into the analysis.  The cost per square foot of demolition shown assumes  that the district has “harvested” many salvageable materials themselves using their own  maintenance personnel.  Often light and plumbing fixtures as well as HVAC components  can be saved and in many districts tend to be common to multiple buildings.  Harvesting  these materials provides a district with a supply of spare parts.  The district needs to have  space for storage and a need for those materials in other buildings but when that occurs  harvesting is a viable option. For those districts that harvesting salvageable materials is not  an option, the demolition cost is often reduced from that shown by allowing the demolition  company to have the salvage rights.      FINANCIAL ANALYSIS     For analysis purposes, we have created a financial model based on the twenty‐two (22)  buildings studied.  The data generated from that analysis provided the parameters for a  hypothetical Michigan school district having a student population that would decrease  - 16-
  17. 17. THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND  THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES  over  the  next  20  years  at  a  rate  similar  to  the  total  student  population  of  the  State  of  Michigan.  The financial ratios used in the analysis are shown in Table 6.    TABLE 6 ‐  FINANCIAL RATIOS FOR ANALYSIS    Ratio  Criteria  Low  High  Average  Median  Building Size ‐ Student Capacity  Square Feet  12,400  257,392  71,853  53,765  Student Capacity  90  1,430  471  358            Current Annual Operating Cost  Square Foot  $4.42  $14.60  $8.60  $8.12  Student Capacity  619  2,012  1,263  1,172  Cost to Mothball  Square Foot  $3.72  $7.68  $6.13  $6.23  Student Capacity  521  1,062  903  891  Mothball Annual Operating Cost  Square Foot  $0.50  $0.78  $0.60  $0.67  Student Capacity  67  111  88  100  Cost for Building Demolition  Square Foot  $5.00  $3.00  $4.82  $5.00  Student Capacity  420  900  713  703    Three scenarios were modeled:  1. NO RE‐SIZING OF FACILITY CAPACITY ‐ This scenario assumes loss of student  population and the continued maintenance of all current facilities.  2. DISPOSAL  OF  EXCESS  FACILITIES  ‐  This  scenario  assumes  reducing  student  capacity  by  2,355  students  by  the  demolition  of  four  excess  facilities  to  optimize building capacity with the projected student enrollment.    3. MOTHBALLING FACILITIES FOR FUTURE REUSE ‐ This scenario assumes reducing  student capacity by 2,355 students by closing and mothballing four facilities  for future use.  Each scenario has differing impacts.  Graphically the interaction between school capacity  and enrollment is shown in the following three graphs.  Obviously, under the first scenario,  if nothing is changed the school capacity (as shown by the green line at the top of the  - 17-
  18. 18. THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND  THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES  graph) continues unchanged throughout the planning period.  As enrollment drops (red  line) the amount of excess capacity (yellow shaded area) continues to increase.     Under  the  second  scenario  excess  capacity  is  eliminated  by  closing  and  demolishing  buildings.    While  this  does  right‐size  the  district  in  terms  of  having  capacity  match  enrollment note what happens during the period from 2015 through 2025.  The U.S.    Census Bureau projection is for a modest rebound in the number of school age children in  Michigan.  Whether this will actually occur in light of the severe economic recession and  - 18-
  19. 19. THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND  THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES  the  associated  impact  on  migration  is  open  for  conjecture.    The  point  is  that  if  the  population  does  rebound  there  is  nothing  to  do  but  accept  overcrowding  or  rebuild  capacity that was previously eliminated.    The mothballing option does allow a district to bring a facility back “on‐line” as enrollment  warrants.  However, there are costs associated with both maintaining a building and re‐ opening a building.  Sometimes, as shown by the graph, it then becomes necessary to re‐ mothball a building when enrollment drops again.  Clearly, these are factors that need to be  weighed when making a decision on excess educational facilities.          RESULTS OF FINANCIAL ANALYSIS  In  Table  7  the  costs  for  each  of  the  three  alternative  scenarios  is  shown.      The  cost  to  maintain the current facilities for the 20‐year period is estimated to be $275.0 million.  The  cost  to  demolish  the  four  structures,  balancing  facility  capacity  with  project  student  population  and  maintain  the  “right  sizes”  required  facilities  is  estimated  to  be  $235.3  million.  This is a 16.9% saving amounting to $39.7 million.  Cost to close and mothball four  - 19-
  20. 20. THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND  THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES  facilities for future reuse with retaining the remaining capacity to “Right‐size” required  facilities is estimated to be $224.6 million.  This is a 22.4% savings amounting to $50.4  million.    CIVIC AND SOCIAL IMPLICATIONS OF RIGHT‐SIZING  Schools,  especially  in  smaller  and  rural  communities  play  many  roles.    In  addition  to  serving  educational  functions,  schools  serve  as  the  social  and  cultural  center  of  the  community, providing a venue for sports, theater, music and other civic activities. (See:  What Does a School Mean to a Community? Assessing the Social and Economic Benefit of  Schools to Rural Villages in New Your, Thomas A. Lyon, Journal of Research in Rural  Education, Winter, 2002)    They  are  most  often  sited  in  critical  locations  within  the  community  land  use  pattern,  intertwined with local residential neighborhoods.  Any reorganization of school facilities  will impact land use planning and social connectivity within the community at minimum,  changing the school where neighborhoods have historically sent their children, possibly  ending use of facilities for various social and civic activities.     We have concluded our analysis by listing potential social, civic, land use and economic  development that could possibly arise during evaluation of alternative facility management  options.    1.   “Right  Sizing”  of  school  districts  will  disrupt  the  current  pattern  of  student  transport to/from school, whether this be by walking to a neighborhood school or bus  transport  to  a  central  school  location.    These  changes  will  require  engagement  with  parents and community leaders to formulate the most acceptable mean of student transport  to school.    2.  Removal of a school will likely disrupt the institution that holds together the  community  civil  structures  and  community  social  “connectiveness”.  Due  role  of  the  school in providing not only education, but employment and a place for social, cultural and  recreational opportunities, closure of a school will likely “wipe‐out” the one building with  an identity which all people in the neighborhood or school district hold in common.      - 20-
  21. 21. THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND  THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES  TABLE 7 ‐ 20‐YEAR COST ANALYSIS 2008 ‐ 2028    Year   2008  2009  2010  2011  2012  2013  2014  2015  2016  2017  2018  2019  2020  2021  2022  2023  2024  2025  2026  2027  2028  Building Student Capacity   Current  10,370  10,370  10,370  10,370  10,370  10,370  10,370  10,370  10,370  10,370  10,370  10,370  10,370  10,370  10,370  10,370  10,370  10,370  10,370  10,370  10,370  Right Sized  10,370  10,370  8,015  8,015  8,015  8,015  8,015  8,015  8,015  8,015  8,015  8,015  8,015  8,015  8,015  8,015  8,015  8,015  8,015  8,015  8,015  Facility Operating Costs (in millions)  Scenarios  1. No Change  Operating $  $13.1  $13.1  $13.1  $13.1  $13.1  $13.1  $13.1  $13.1  $13.1  $13.1  $13.1  $13.1  $13.1  $13.1  $13.1  $13.1  $13.1  $13.1  $13.1  $13.1  $13.1  2. Demo  Operating $  $13.1  $13.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  Demo Cost      $16.8                                      Total  $13.1  $13.1  $26.9  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  3. Mothball  Operating $  $13.1  $13.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  $10.1  Mothball $      $2.1                                      Annual MB$      $0.2  $0.2  $0.2  $0.2  $0.2  $0.2  $0.2  $0.2  $0.2  $0.2  $0.2  $0.2  $0.2  $0.2  $0.2  $0.2  $0.2  $0.2  $0.2  Total  $13.1  $13.1  $12.5  $10.3  $10.3  $10.3  $10.3  $10.3  $10.3  $10.3  $10.3  $10.3  $10.3  $10.3  $10.3  $10.3  $10.3  $10.3  $10.3  $10.3  $10.3      20‐Year Comparative Analysis  Scenario  Cost (millions)  Savings (millions)  No Change  $275.0    Demo  $235.3  $39.7  Mothball  $224.6  $50.4      - 21-
  22. 22. THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND  THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES  3.  Removal/closure  of  a  school  may  impact  future  population  growth.   Demographers have documented the importance of schools in the decision to purchase a  home by families with school aged children.  Communities with no school and long school  commuting  patterns  may  be  viewed as a less  favorable community to live  and raise  a  family and thus suffer slower population growth.    4.  Removal/closure  of  a  school  may  affect  the  growth  of  business.    Businesses  seeking employees may be reluctant to locate in a community that has no school and long  school commuting patterns due to the concern of attracting new family workers to locate in  the community or a problem of parental absenteeism to respond to family school needs.    5.  Removal/closure of a school will affect the Master Plan of the community. For the  most  part,  community  planning  is  based  on  the  current  pattern  of  land  use.    The  community master plan contemplates the location of a school in the future not a vacant  building or site for reuse and thus will need to be updated.     6.  Given the positive attributes associated with schools, “right‐sizing” will mount  vigorous remonstrance.  Communities threatened by “right‐sizing” will undoubtedly be  threatened by vigorous efforts to retain the status quo, as this response has the least impact  upon all individuals.    CONCLUSIONS  Most readers will easily recognize and accept the relationship of schools to the social and  economic well‐being of the community.  Studies have documented the effect of schools on  community civic structures, housing values, population and business growth.  In many  instances, schools serve as the source of personal identity, a topic of social discourse and  the foundation for community social and business cohesion.    Local  government  and  school  leaders,  education  administrators  and  local  citizens also  realize  a  community,  having  a  large  number  of  local  institutions  and  organizations,  a  diverse  and  involved  business  sector  plus  and  actively  engaged  citizenry,  provide  the  interpersonal cohesion that creates a strong civic infrastructure leading to a higher level of  well‐being and community welfare.   - 22-
  23. 23. THE DECLINING POPULATION DEMOGRAPHIC AND  THE IMPACT UPON EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES    While financial analysis is important to “Right‐sizing” it is also important to document and  quantify  what  the  school  means  to  the  local  community  and  the  community  planning  obligations  needed  to  mitigate  adverse  civic  and  social  changes  due  to  “Right‐sizing”  decision.        ABOUT THE AUTHORS  Carl H. Baxmeyer is a Senior Associate and heads the Solutions Group of Fanning Howey  Associates, Inc. an architectural/engineering/planning firm practicing in the area of school  planning and design.  He is responsible for school population projection analysis.  He can  be reached at cbaxmeyer@fhai.com    Charles Eckenstahler is a Senior Consultant with McKenna Associates and serves as an  advisor to the Fanning Howey Solutions Group. He is a 35 year veteran real estate and  municipal  planning  consultant.    He  teaches  economic  development  subjects  in  the  Graduate School of Business at Purdue North Central, Westville, Indiana and serves on the  faculty of the Lowell Stahl Center for Commercial Real Estate Studies at Lewis University,  Oakbrook Illinois. He can be contacted at pcteckencomcast.net    - 23-

×