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CYP Mamagement Standards

CYP Mamagement Standards

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  • 1. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS May 2008
  • 2. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSii
  • 3. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS Table of ContentsI. OVERVIEW......................................................................................................................................................1 BACKGROUND ...........................................................................................................................................................1 PURPOSE ....................................................................................................................................................................1 ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE FOR EFFICIENT PRACTICES .......................................................................................2 REGIONAL ORGANIZATION ........................................................................................................................................4 BENCHMARKING AND BEST PRACTICES .....................................................................................................................5 Information from the field ....................................................................................................................................5 Industry and Government Study Results ..............................................................................................................5II. CYP SIZE DETERMINATION ......................................................................................................................7 CDC SIZE DETERMINATION ......................................................................................................................................8 CDC CAPACITY DETERMINATION .............................................................................................................................9 Square Footage ....................................................................................................................................................9 Bathroom Requirements.....................................................................................................................................10 Maximizing Capacity .........................................................................................................................................10 SAC SIZE DETERMINATION .....................................................................................................................................11 SAC CAPACITY DETERMINATION ............................................................................................................................11 SAC Program Types...........................................................................................................................................12 SAC Program Size..............................................................................................................................................13 Prorated Enrollment ..........................................................................................................................................13III. CYP STAFFING STANDARDS....................................................................................................................15 FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO CYP STAFFING STANDARDS ......................................................................................15 REGIONAL STAFFING ...............................................................................................................................................16 INSTALLATION CYP ................................................................................................................................................17 WORKING ACROSS THE CYP...................................................................................................................................18 Direct Care Staff ................................................................................................................................................18 Support Staff.......................................................................................................................................................19 CYP TRAINING ........................................................................................................................................................21 The Role of the Training and Curriculum Specialist..........................................................................................22 STANDARD AGENCY CLASSIFIED POSITION DESCRIPTIONS .....................................................................................25 STANDARDS FOR CYP REGIONAL POSITIONS ..........................................................................................................27 STANDARDS FOR CYP INSTALLATION POSITIONS....................................................................................................29 Guidance for Assignment of CYP Oversight and Dual-Hat Positions ...............................................................29 STANDARDS FOR CYP PROFESSIONAL POSITIONS IN EACH CYP COMPONENT ........................................................29 CYP Director Positions......................................................................................................................................29 CYP School Liaison OfficerPositions ................................................................................................................37IV. NON-LABOR EXPENSES ............................................................................................................................39 FOOD SERVICE STANDARDS ....................................................................................................................................39 CHILD AND ADULT CARE FOOD PROGRAM (CACFP)..............................................................................................39 USDA Standards for Meals and Snacks .............................................................................................................40 Food Service Guidelines for CDC .....................................................................................................................40 Food Service Guidelines for SAC.......................................................................................................................40 Food Service Guidelines for CDH .....................................................................................................................41 WORKING ACROSS THE CYP...................................................................................................................................41 SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT ......................................................................................................................................41 CDC ...................................................................................................................................................................42 CDH ...................................................................................................................................................................43 SAC ....................................................................................................................................................................43 i
  • 4. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS Youth Programs .................................................................................................................................................43 MAXIMIZING EFFICIENCES FOR SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT .....................................................................................43 COSTS FOR SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT ....................................................................................................................44V. SUBSIDIES & INCENTIVES........................................................................................................................47 CORE CDH SUBSIDY OVERVIEW AND AUTHORIZATION ..........................................................................................47 CORE CDH CASH SUBSIDIES AND INCENTIVES .......................................................................................................47 Additional CDH Incentive Ideas ........................................................................................................................49 CYP PROGRAM INCENTIVES AND RECOGNITIONS ...................................................................................................50 Recognition and Appreciation............................................................................................................................52 Encouraging Staff Development.........................................................................................................................52VI. NAF REVENUES ...........................................................................................................................................53 CNIC FEE POLICY ...................................................................................................................................................53 INCOME FROM USDA REIMBURSEMENT .................................................................................................................54 USDA Reimbursement Rates..............................................................................................................................54 Maximizing USDA Reimbursements ..................................................................................................................55 ADDITIONAL REVENUE OPTIONS .............................................................................................................................56 GRANTS ...................................................................................................................................................................57 Grant Writing Tips .............................................................................................................................................58APPENDIX A: CDC ADDITIONAL ENROLLMENT COST ANALYSIS WORKSHEET .............................59 INSTRUCTIONS FOR USING THE CDC ADDITIONAL ENROLLMENT COST ANALYSIS WORKSHEET............................60 Overview and Purpose .......................................................................................................................................60 Detailed Instruction ...........................................................................................................................................60 CDC ADDITIONAL ENROLLMENT COST ANALYSIS WORKSHEET.............................................................................63APPENDIX B: SAC ADDITIONAL ENROLLMENT COST ANALYSIS WORKSHEET ..............................65 INSTRUCTIONS FOR USING THE SAC ADDITIONAL ENROLLMENT COST ANALYSIS WORKSHEET ............................66 Overview and Purpose .......................................................................................................................................66 Detailed Instruction ...........................................................................................................................................66 SAC ADDITIONAL ENROLLMENT COST ANALYSIS WORKSHEET .............................................................................69APPENDIX C: CYP WEEKLY STAFF SCHEDULE WORKSHEET................................................................71 INSTRUCTIONS FOR USING THE CYP WEEKLY STAFF SCHEDULE WORKSHEET .......................................................72 Overall Summary ...............................................................................................................................................72 Detailed Instructions..........................................................................................................................................72 Printing Completed Staff Schedules...................................................................................................................75 CYP WEEKLY STAFF SCHEDULE WORKSHEET ........................................................................................................76APPENDIX D: CDC WEEKLY STAFF SCHEDULE WORKSHEET ...............................................................79 INSTRUCTIONS FOR USING THE CDC WEEKLY STAFF SCHEDULE WORKSHEET ......................................................80 Overall Summary ...............................................................................................................................................80 Detailed Instructions..........................................................................................................................................80 Printing Completed Staff Schedules...................................................................................................................83 CDC WEEKLY STAFF SCHEDULE WORKSHEET .......................................................................................................84APPENDIX E: SAC/YP WEEKLY STAFF SCHEDULE WORKSHEET..........................................................87 INSTRUCTIONS FOR USING THE SAC/YP WEEKLY STAFF SCHEDULE WORKSHEET .................................................88 Overall Summary ...............................................................................................................................................88 Detailed Instructions..........................................................................................................................................88 Printing Completed Staff Schedules...................................................................................................................91 SAC/YP WEEKLY STAFF SCHEDULE WORKSHEET ..................................................................................................92 ii
  • 5. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS TablesTABLE 2-1: CYP SIZE DETERMINATION ....................................................................................................... 7TABLE 2-2: AGE GROUP INFORMATION ........................................................................................................ 8TABLE 2-3: REQUIRED SQUARE FOOTAGE PER CHILD ............................................................................... 10TABLE 2-4: CLASSROOM BATHROOM REQUIREMENTS............................................................................... 10TABLE 2-5: PRORATED ENROLLMENT EXAMPLE ........................................................................................ 14TABLE 3-1: SUPPORT STAFF ........................................................................................................................ 20TABLE 3-2: CYP T&C SPECIALIST AUTHORIZATION ................................................................................. 24TABLE 3-3: AGENCY CLASSIFIED POSITIONS AND GRADES ....................................................................... 25TABLE 4-1: COST PER CHILD FOR NON-LABOR EXPENSES ......................................................................... 44TABLE 5-1: CORE CDH SUBSIDIES AND INCENTIVES ................................................................................. 48TABLE 5-2: SUGGESTED CDH INCENTIVES................................................................................................. 49TABLE 5-3: CYP PROFESSIONAL INCENTIVES ............................................................................................ 51 iii
  • 6. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS
  • 7. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS I. OverviewBACKGROUNDThe goals of Department of Defense (DoD) and Navy Child and Youth Programs (CYP) are toassist commanders and families in balancing the competing demands of family life and militaryreadiness and to improve the economic viability of the family unit. Military child developmentprograms have been nationally recognized as a model for child care reform, largely as a result ofprogress made since the 1989 Military Child Care Act which increased quality, availability, andaffordability of child care for DoD families. The focus moving forward is on all parts of NavyCYP working as a single unit. As the Navy maintains its commitment to families and grows itsprograms, those same characteristics of quality, availability and affordability apply across allCYP components: Child Development Centers (CDC), Child Development Homes (CDH),School Age Care (SAC), Youth Programs (YP), and Child and Youth Education Services(CYES). While each program is unique, all serve the needs of military families and their childrenas they move from infancy through the teen years. The same high standards apply across allprograms. By working as a unit, the CYP can most effectively and efficiently use its resources tobest serve military families.PURPOSEThe purpose of the CYP Management Standards (MS) is to provide practices, requirements, andguidance for CYPs to operate efficiently and effectively as they provide seamless delivery ofservice across all programs. All CYPs are mandated to be of the highest quality to best serveNavy families, thus accreditation is required in CDC and SAC programs through the NationalAssociation for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) and the National AfterschoolAssociation (NAA). Accreditation is expected for CDH Providers through the NationalAssociation for Family Child Care (NAFCC). To achieve this goal, the CYP MS identifies bestpractices for controlling costs by efficiently utilizing space, maximizing enrollment,appropriately staffing programs, and developing procedures across the CYP for ordering andmaintaining food, equipment and supplies. Through these practices, and by working as one team,communication is increased and the CYP can establish unified goals, manage budgets, andincrease accountability.If each component of the CYP functions separately, goals may not in be in sync, there may beduplication of duties, inconsistent policies and procedures, excess costs of labor and materials, 1
  • 8. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSand lack of sufficient support for each component. It is as if each member of a family functionedseparately within a home. By functioning as a unit and making the CYP team concept a part ofeveryone’s thinking, resources are maximized and work efforts become more productive.Systems can be developed that recognize the uniqueness of each program while unifyingpractices that work across the CYP to provide support for all components so that all children,families and CYP professionals are best served and quality and support are standardized.Following the CYP MS provides benefits to each program component as well as the CYP as awhole. The following are some of the benefits that can be expected by fully implementing theCYP MS.• Continued quality improvement as program operates more efficiently.• Shared pride in success of each program thus raising morale.• Increased positive perceptions about the quality of all CYPs.• Recognized equality of all programs within the CYP.• Consistency for parents as children age up through the CYP system.• Increased opportunities for staff professional development and growth.• Support for maximizing enrollment and increasing participation in program activities.• More efficient spending for supplies and equipment.• Consistency for Navy families as they transfer to various locations.ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE FOR EFFICIENTPRACTICESThe structure of an organization directly contributes to its efficiency. At the installation orregional level, it is critical that the organizational structure support the overall goals of theprogram in order for the CYP to function efficiently as a unit. Everyone who is part of theprogram needs to be aware of the structure, its relationship to the goals, and the importance ofsupporting that structure. All parties must understand their roles, fulfill their responsibilities, andsupport others in doing the same.At each installation and/or within each region, the practices and procedures of the CYP becomemost efficient when the CYP functions as one unit and centralized processes are established.Each component of the CYP, however, has a very unique mission and purpose to meet the needs 2
  • 9. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSof children at different development stages. It is essential that the overall structure andfunctioning of the CYP be in support of each unique component. The structure will also varyaccording to geographic areas which means that the structure of the CYP in a remote area willlook different from one located in a metro area. The standards provided here are to assist CYPleadership in designing the organization that best meets the needs of each region and/orinstallation.There are some CYP functions that are required to be implemented at each installation and,where possible, regionally. As a CYP, each installation (or region) must:• Designate a CYP Point of Contact (POC) position at the installation – This may be a dedicated position or a dual–hatted position with CYP oversight (more guidance and options are provided in Chapter 3 of this document).• Maintain a singular waiting list for all CYP.• Coordinate the use of Training & Curriculum Specialist positions across programs.• Have a combined Parent Involvement Board (PIB) that is open to parents of all CYP components.• Release a singular fee letter annually that covers all CYP programs.• Have a combined Special Needs Review Board.• Develop Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) required by the OPNAV. SOPs shall be written in a way that applies to all CYP components and tailored to meet the specific requirements of individual programs when necessary.• Develop Parent Handbooks / CYP Professional Handbooks that cover all CYP programs.• Provide CYP Resource & Referral (R&R) services covering all CYP programs.• Prepare data call submissions.• Implement a School Transition Response Team (STRT).In order to achieve maximum efficiency, the organizational structure must be in place thatsupports these requirements. The structure must allow information to be shared, communicationto happen between programs, and roles and responsibilities to be clearly defined to avoidduplication of processes. Those with CYP oversight must bring managers of all programstogether to ensure proper implementation of management standards concerning use of space,staffing, incentives, revenues including USDA reimbursement and the ordering of supplies andequipment. Whether the CYP is small, medium or large, the structure across the CYP is a critical 3
  • 10. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSaspect of achieving efficiency. Additional practices to be implemented, when applicable, acrossthe CYP to help maximize efficiency include:• Use of staff across programs.• Singular staffing schedule.• CYP staff orientations.• CYP marketing efforts.• Development of plan for increasing Non-appropriated Funds (NAF) revenues.• CYP ordering of food, equipment and supplies.REGIONAL ORGANIZATIONRegions are finding ways to structure themselves in order to provide support to all installationCYPs. Providing support and services regionally helps to minimize duplication of efforts acrossthe region, utilizes positions and talents most effectively, reduces costs of materials andequipment through bulk purchasing and/or sharing of information on most cost effectiveprocesses and/or vendors and can increase revenues through combined fundraising efforts suchas applying for grants. Each region has its own unique characteristics and challenges based ongeography, number and location of installations, and particular needs of personnel within theregion which have to be taken into consideration when establishing regional practices.When functioning at a regional level even more opportunities for efficiency become optionswhich have benefits across all installations and programs. Some examples of regional supportprovided to CYPs are:• Regional oversight positions – These positions provide support to programs to keep everyone on the “same page” in terms of business practices as well as programming. See Chapter 3 for additional information on regional oversight positions.• Development and implementation of policies.• Coordination of data calls, high oversight of “hands-on” support and training for management positions.• Coordination of maintenance on regional level.• Development of standardized pricing. 4
  • 11. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS• Provision of parent and/or staff handbooks.• Tracking of personnel actions and monthly reports.• Liaison for Commander Navy Installations Command (CNIC).• Coordination of Central Waiting List (CWL) and R&R services.• Coordination of meetings and/or conference calls for Installation CYP Directors within the region.• Coordination of training within the region to maximize strength of the Training and Curriculum (T&C) Specialists.BENCHMARKING AND BEST PRACTICESThe CYP Management Standards were compiled based on benchmarking and best practicesfound in the resources listed in the section titled Industry and Government Study Results.Information from the fieldInterviews and consultations with installation and regional representatives from the fieldprovided input into many aspects of development of standards related to staffing, utilization ofspace, program size, USDA reimbursements, revenues and costs.Industry and Government Study ResultsAfterschool Alliance. (2000, January). Afterschool alert: Poll report. Retrieved December 6, 2007, from http://www.afterschoolalliance.org/June2000_Poll_Rpt_FINAL.pdfAfterschool Alliance. (2007, March). 21st century community learning centers: providing afterschool supports to communities nationwide. Retrieved December 6, 2007, from http://www.afterschoolalliance.org/21stcclc.pdfBesharov, D.J., Myers, J.A., & Morrow, J.S. (2007, August 31). Costs per child for early childhood education and care: Comparing Head Start, CCDF child care, and prekindergarten/preschool programs (2003/2004). Retrieved December 6, 2007, from http://www.aei.org/docLib/20070906_CostperChild.pdfBoys and Girls Club of America. (2006). Boys and Girls Club of America: Our core promise (2005 annual report). Retrieved December 6, 2007, from http://marketing.bgca.org/marketing/files/2007AnnualReport_lo.pdfChildren’s Defense Fund. (2005). The state of America’s children: 2005. Retrieved December 6, 2007, from http://campaign.childrensdefense.org/publications/greenbook/default.aspx 5
  • 12. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSConnell, L.H. (2005). The childcare answer book. Naperville: Sphinx Publishing.Halpern, R., Deich, S., & Cohen, C. (2000, May). Financing after-school programs. Retrieved December 6, 2007, from http://www.financeproject.org/Publications/financing_afterschool_programs.htmLind, C., Relave, N., Deich, S., Grossman, J., & Gersick, A. (2006, May). The costs of out-of- school-time programs: A review of the available evidence. Retrieved December 6, 2007, from http://www.financeproject.org/publications/litreview.pdfNational Institute on Out-of-School Time at Wellesley Centers for Women. (2007). Making the case: A fact sheet on children and youth in out-of-school time. Retrieved December 6, 2007, from www.niost.org/publications/Final2007FactSheet.pdfOesterreich, L. (1998). Child care: Financial basics. Retrieved December 6, 2007, from www.extension.iastate.edu/Publications/PM1751.pdf Oliveira, P. (2005, June). Connecticut child care center operating budget basics: Calculating your bottom line. Retrieved December 6, 2007, from http://www.ctkidslink.org/publications/ece05operating06.pdfPardee, M. (2005, October 13). Community Investment Collaborative for Kids – Volume 3: Equipping and furnishing early childhood facilities. Retrieved December 6, 2007, from http://www.lisc.org/files/813_file_asset_upload_file111_775.pdfPittman, K. (2001, June). Reading between the studies. Youth Today, p. 55.Pomper, K., Blank, H., Duff Campbell, N., & Schulman, K. (2005). Be all that we can be: Lessons from the military for improving our nation’s child care system (2004 follow-up). Retrieved December 6, 2007, from http://www.nwlc.org/pdf/BeAllThatYouCanBeFollowUp2005FINAL.pdfUnited States General Accounting Office. (1999, October). Child Care: How Do Military and Civilian Center Costs Compare? December 6, 2007, from http://www.gao.gov/archive/2000/he00007.pdf.Zellman, G.L., & Gates, S.M. (2002). Examining the cost of military child care. Santa Monica: RAND. 6
  • 13. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS II. CYP Size Determination The CYP MS uses the size of the CYP to determine the staffing standards that are authorized. Authorized CYP MS staffing standards are detailed in Chapter 3. These staffing standards have been established to support a variety of scenarios and sizes of programs. Small, medium and large designations are determined for each CYP component type and for the CYP as a whole. The size of the CYP component is used to determine the support staff that is authorized. Table 2-1 illustrates the size determination for each CYP component, as well as the overall installation CYP. TABLE 2-1: CYP SIZE DETERMINATION Delivery System Small Medium LargeCDC Up to 100 children 101-199 children 200+ children(maximum capacity of openclassrooms)CDH Up to 29 providers 30-85 providers 86+ providers(certified & in process providers)(average of 4.5 children per home) 0-131 children 132-383 384+childrenSAC Up to 100 children 101-199 children 200+ children(prorated enrollment – see SACCapacity Determination) Total CYP size Small Medium Large Up to 331 childrenTotal Installation CYP SizeBands 332 to 781 children(for CDC, CDH, & SACprograms) 782+ children • CDC size is determined by the maximum capacity of all open classrooms. Information about how to determine CDC capacity is provided in Table 2-2. • SAC size is determined by the prorated enrollment number of children. Information about how to determine SAC capacity and how to calculate prorated enrollment provided in the section titled SAC Capacity Determination in this chapter. • CDH size is determined by the number of certified and in-process providers. The number of children served is determined based on an average enrollment per home of 4.5 children. An in-process CDH provider is defined as an applicant who has submitted the application and 7
  • 14. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS has started work to become certified (e.g., childproofing the home or attending CPR). To be considered in process, the CDH staff must actively spend time working with the in- process CDH provider (e.g., conducting background checks, conducting the home interview, conducting orientation training, etc.). An applicant may only be counted as an in-process provider for the purpose of the CYP MS for no more than 30 days prior to certification, unless the program can show documentation of on-going processes.• The total CYP size (non-inclusive of youth) is determined based on a compilation of the sizes of the CDC, SAC and CDH components.• Youth Program standards are currently under development and will be completed during FY09.CDC SIZE DETERMINATIONThe size of the CDC is based on the full capacity of all open classrooms in the center. The logicbehind using capacity instead of the actual enrollment of the classroom is because the classroommust be furnished and staffed to full capacity regardless of whether the room has reached fullenrollment. For example, if the capacity of a preschool classroom is 24, but only 20 children areenrolled, two teachers are still required, and the classroom equipment and toys must meet theCreative Curriculum requirements for the children.The CDC normally accommodates children ages 6 weeks to 5 years (or when the child startskindergarten). Table 2-2 is provided as a reference of age groups, ratio and maximum groupsizes at a typical CDC. The OPNAVINST 1700.9 provides additional information and guidancerelated to CYP operational requirements. TABLE 2-2: AGE GROUP INFORMATION Age Group Ages Teacher/Child Ratio Group Size Infant 6 weeks – 12 mos. 1 teacher per 4 children 8 children Pretoddler 13 mos. – 24 mos. 1 teacher per 5 children 10 children Toddler 25 mos. – 36 mos. 1 teacher per 7 children 14 children Preschool 37 mos. – 5 yrs. 1 teacher per 12 children 24 children School Age1 5 yrs. – 12 yrs. 1 teacher per 15 children 30 children 1 Children are counted in School Age as soon as they start kindergarten. 8
  • 15. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSSome Navy CDCs have rooms that are used as school age care classrooms. Children who haveentered school shall be provided care at the SAC program, including part-day kindergartenprograms. Care of school age children is ONLY authorized at the CDC under the following twoconditions:• There is no SAC program at the installation, and/or• There are empty classrooms and there are NO children on the CWL Excess or Preferred lists.If these conditions are met and SAC is provided at the CDC, the programs should meet therequirements of Navy SAC programs. It is important that the children are offered an experiencethat is appropriate for their age group and not a duplication of the school day or an extension ofthe CDC program.CDC CAPACITY DETERMINATIONCapacity of the classroom is defined as the number of child spaces that are available at any onetime based on the classroom square footage, the number of child size toilets and sinks available,and the group size requirements in the OPNAVINST 1700.9. If a classroom can accommodatemore than the group sizes listed in Table 2-2, based on square footage and bathroomrequirements, the requirements of the OPNAVINST 1700.9 must be followed regarding morethan one group in a room. The following requirements should be considered when determiningthe appropriate capacity for each classroom.Square FootageWhen determining capacity, square footage is defined in terms of “uninterrupted activity space”(UAS). UAS is defined as space in a classroom used exclusively for activity, excluding dedicatedfunctional areas, such as diaper changing station, the food preparation station, the toileting areas,storage areas, installed millwork, door swings, and dedicated circulation space. Additionalinformation for determining square footage is available in the Unified Facilities Criteria (UFC)for Child Development Centers, UFC 4-740-14. Table 2-3 shows the required square footage perchild. 9
  • 16. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS TABLE 2-3: REQUIRED SQUARE FOOTAGE PER CHILD 1 Infant Pretoddler Toddler Preschool 65 ft2 Per Infant 35 ft2 Per Child 35 ft2 Per Child 35 ft2 Per Child 1 If school age children are enrolled, use 35 ft2 per child to determine capacity.Bathroom RequirementsAll classrooms are required to meet the toilet, hand washing and diaper changing requirements asprescribed in the OPNAVINST 1700.9. If a classroom does not meet the minimum requirementsas outlined in Table 2-4, but a documented need exists for a classroom to be used by a specificage group, a waiver request can be submitted to CNIC (N912). A project should be submitted torenovate the classroom to meet the bathroom requirements. If funding is not available locally, thescope of the project and a funding request shall be submitted as part of the waiver request. Ifschool age children are cared for in the facility appropriate bathrooms of proper height must beavailable, as well as measures to ensure privacy. Diaper changing stations with proper handwashing sinks must be available in all classrooms providing care for infants, pretoddlers, andtoddlers. As much as possible, diaper changing stations should be available in preschoolclassrooms. No child should be denied care or not transitioned to the next age group based solelyon potty training requirements. TABLE 2-4: CLASSROOM BATHROOM REQUIREMENTS Pretoddler Toddler Preschool One toilet One toilet One toilet Two hand washing sinks One hand washing sink One hand washing sink (per 10 children or 2 groups) (per 7 children or 1 group) (per 12 children or 1 group)Maximizing CapacityTo maximize capacity, CDC Directors should review classroom utilization and analyze wait listdemand information. Full and consistent utilization of space is a primary goal of Navy CYP andis key to meeting the needs of Navy families. Drop-in care should be offered to parents to furthermaximize space at the CDC. No CDC should have empty classrooms and a waiting list. 10
  • 17. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSAppendix A, CDC Additional Enrollment Cost Analysis Worksheet, provides information forCDC Directors to assist in determining when classrooms should be opened. If necessary,additional funding should be requested from CNIC (N912) to open classrooms and minimize thenumber of children on the CWL.The age group distribution of a CDC should be considered when reviewing capacity. All NavyCDC facilities must have a minimum of one infant and one pretoddler classroom. In the case ofvery small centers, a mixed-age group classroom can be established. When possible, no morethan 40% of the children served are under age 3; however, this is not a requirement. Infants andpretoddlers represent the greatest number of children on wait lists at all Navy installations. Thegoal of Navy CYP is to reduce wait list numbers by maximizing capacity, regardless of the agegroup distribution within the program. Mixed age group classrooms should be considered if waitlist data justifies this as an option. The safety of children should always be considered first whenconsidering a multi-age room.SAC SIZE DETERMINATIONThe SAC program is designed to meet the needs of parents once their children start school.Programs offered at SAC are designed to complement the children’s school day and provide carefor children when schools are not in session. The hours that are offered at the SAC programshould be established based on the local school schedule and command requirements.Management Standards for SAC are based on a 1 staff per 15 children ratio.SAC CAPACITY DETERMINATIONCapacity of the SAC facility is defined as the number of child spaces that are available at anyone time based on square footage, the number of available and appropriate bathrooms, and thegroup size requirements in the OPNAVINST 1700.9. The overall capacity of the facility will bedetermined by the installation fire personnel. A minimum of 35 square feet per child shall beavailable for children to play and conduct appropriate activities. Drop-in care should beoffered to parents to further maximize space at the SAC.Additionally, operational capacity is also determined by the need for, and availability oftransportation to and from schools attended by the children at the installation. If the squarefootage of a facility allows for additional children to be accommodated, a lack of transportationshould NOT be a deciding factor if children are accommodated. If a documented need exists fortransportation and local funding is not available for additional vehicles, a funding request can besubmitted to CNIC (N912). 11
  • 18. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSTo maximize capacity, Youth Directors should be reviewing capacity and analyzing wait listdemand information. Full and consistent utilization of space is a primary goal of Navy CYP andis key to meeting the needs of Navy families. No SAC should have excess capacity and awaiting list. Because children who attend schools not serviced by the SAC may not beaccounted for on the wait list, it is important that Youth Directors work with the command todetermine the actual need of military families. Appendix B, SAC Additional Enrollment CostAnalysis Worksheet, provides information for Youth Directors to assist them in determiningwhen transportation should be provided to additional schools. If necessary, additional fundingmay be requested from CNIC (N912). The request should include the additional labor and non-labor expenses based on the Management Standards that will be incurred AND the projectedadditional parent fees that will be generated.SAC Program TypesBecause the SAC program is designed to meet the needs of parents and to accommodate thechildren’s school schedules, a variety of programs are offered. The same children may beenrolled in some or all of these programs; however, the hours and the time of year theseprograms are offered determines the program type. The operating hours for the SAC and CDCshould be aligned to meet the needs of parents with children in both programs. SAC programtypes are include the following:Before School – The Before School program is offered to meet the needs of the commandmembers who have to go to work prior to the start of their child’s school day. Transportationmay be offered by the SAC program or by the local school bus system. Hours shall beestablished that meet the needs of command requirements. If the SAC program providestransportation to the school these hours should be accounted for as part of the daily hours staff isneeded.After School – The After School program is offered to meet the needs of command memberswhose work day extends beyond the time their child is out of school for the day. Transportationmay be offered by the SAC program or by the local school bus system. Hours shall beestablished that meet the needs of command requirements. If the SAC provides transportationfrom the school in the afternoon, these hours should be accounted for as part of the daily hoursstaff is needed.Half-Day Kindergarten – The half-day kindergarten program is offered to meet the needs of thecommand members who have children that are in kindergarten. This program may be offered inthe morning, afternoon or both. Transportation may be offered by the SAC program or by thelocal school bus system. Hours shall be established that meet the needs of command 12
  • 19. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSrequirements and the local school system’s established hours. If the times of the half daykindergarten program overlap with the before and after school program, then only the hoursneeded specifically for this program should be added when considering the number of direct staffneeded for this program. If the SAC provides transportation to or from the school specifically forthe kindergarten program, these hours should be accounted for as part of the daily hours staff isneeded.Holiday/Summer Camps – These are full-day programs. These programs are offered when theschools are not in session. The number of children will normally vary between summer campsand holiday camps, so the programs should be considered separately when determining the needfor staff. Parents normally will drop their children off and pick their children up, sotransportation is not a major factor for these types of programs. Transportation is a considerationwhen determining field trips and other activities for these programs.Intercession Programs – Intercession programs are offered in areas where the local school systemconducts year-round programs.SAC Program SizeEach Navy SAC program is classified as Small, Medium, or Large. You will see as youdetermine the capacity for your program that this classification is used to determine staffingrequirements. The SAC program size is determined based on a prorated enrollment. Aprorated enrollment number is needed because the types of programs vary throughout the year.Prorated EnrollmentThe prorated enrollment number is based on the number of weeks, the daily hours and theprojected number of children of the different types of programs offered throughout the year.Prorated enrollment is determined by applying the following steps:Step one: Determine the percentage of the year a program is offered by dividing the number ofweeks a program is offered by 52.Step Two: Determine the Projected Enrollment Number for each program type.Step Three: Adjust the Projected Enrollment Numbers for each program type based on thenumber of hours the program is offered each day. If the program is offered for less than 4 hoursper day, a .50 factor is multiplied by the projected enrollment number. 13
  • 20. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSStep Four: Adjust the Prorated Enrollment Number for each program type based on the AnnualProrated amount determined in Step One. The number should be rounded up to the nearestwhole number.Step Five: Add these numbers together to determine the Total Prorated Enrollment number forthe SAC.Table 2-5 is an example of how to calculate Total Prorated Enrollment. TABLE 2-5: PRORATED ENROLLMENT EXAMPLE SAC Program Prorated Daily Hours* Weeks Offered Enrollment Type Enrollment Summer Camp 12 12/52 = 23% 159 37 Holiday Camp 12 2/52 = 4% 72 3 Before School 2 38/52 = 73% 25 * .5 10 After School 4 38/52 = 73% 86 * .5 32 Half-Day 4 Kindergarten 38/52 = 73% 14 * .5 6 Total 88 *.50 Factor is applied when the daily hours are ≤ 4 14
  • 21. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS III. CYP Staffing StandardsThe CYP MS includes guidance for staffing levels at the regional, installation and programlevels. Staff is further defined for direct staff and support staff. Ratios and group sizes providethe basis for the staff that provides direct care for children participating in CYP programs. Thesupport staff is defined as those positions which meet the management, administration, trainingand food service functions within each type of CYP. Navy-wide position descriptions will beclassified for the positions discussed within the section Standard Agency Classified PositionDescriptions, presented later in this chapter by 01 Sep 08 and are required to be used by all NavyCYP. If a program has a unique position requirement that is not covered by one of thesepositions, the position description, as well as a justification, should be provided to CNIC (N912)for approval and funding.FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO CYP STAFFINGSTANDARDSThe CYP MS includes guidance for staffing levels at the regional, installation and programlevels. Staff is further defined for direct staff and support staff. Ratios and group sizes providethe basis for the staff that provides direct care for children participating in CYP programs. Thesupport staff is defined as those positions which meet the management, administration, trainingand food service functions within each type of CYP. Navy-wide position descriptions will beclassified for the positions discussed within the section Standard Agency Classified PositionDescriptions, presented later in this chapter by 01 Sep 08 and are required to be used by all NavyCYP. If a program has a unique position requirement that is not covered by one of thesepositions, the position description, as well as a justification, should be provided to CNIC (N912)for approval and funding.The following were key factors in the development of the staffing standards and are establishedto gain efficiencies and higher quality:• Each region provides different levels of support to programs and therefore has different requirements for regional positions.• Each installation is required to have a designated Installation CYP Director.• Size ranges have been defined for each CYP component. (YP requirements and size ranges are still under development and will be incorporated into this guidebook upon completion.) 15
  • 22. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS• Staffing standards for support staff are established based on size ranges for each CYP component.• The number of direct staff is determined based on established ratios and group sizes.• The implementation of the CYP Pay Plan will equalize the pay disparity among CYP Professionals.• CYP Professionals are used across installation CYPs and function as one team.• The staffing plan is designed to offer opportunities for upward mobility and to establish a career ladder across programs.• Training & Curriculum Specialist positions are authorized and shared, when applicable, across the CYP components.• Navy CYP is committed to assisting CYP Professionals in meeting their educational and professional goals. Retention of qualified staff can only be achieved by providing opportunities for career growth and continual training and education opportunities.• A centralized waiting list is established to provide a seamless delivery system for parents.• CYP marketing efforts are unified at the regional and installation levels.• School Liaison Officer staffing is based on school age population and geographic areas where Navy families attend school.In order to achieve maximum efficiency the organizational structure needs to be in place thatbest serves these goals. For the CYP to function as one unit, the structure must be in place forinformation to be shared, for communication to happen between programs and for the roles andresponsibilities to be clearly defined to avoid duplication of processes.REGIONAL STAFFINGWhen considering your regional staff, a regional CYP organization structure that best meets theneeds of the command mission should be determined. The functional and the installationrequirements should be accounted for when designing the regional CYP structure. The level ofspan and control that the regional CYP has and the geographical locations of the installations aresignificant considerations when determining regional staffing requirements. For example, someregions are responsible for day to day operations while others serve an administration function.The number of Installation CYP Directors that report directly to the region is a signal of theregion’s level of span and control. When regions cover a large geographical area and assume a 16
  • 23. MANAGEMENT STANDARDShigh level of span and control for installations, an Installation CYP Director may be designatedto implement regional policies across nearby installations.As the resource manager for Navy CYP, CNIC (N912) will approve all positions assigned to theregion. A regional CYP organization chart showing ADDU and PRIDU report channels and adescription of the regional functions shall be submitted to CNIC (N912). A list of classifiedregional positions is provided later in this chapter (see Table 3-3).INSTALLATION CYPFor the CYP to function as one unit, an organizational structure must be in place that promotesinformation sharing, fluid communication between programs, and clearly defined roles andresponsibilities in order to avoid duplication of processes. In order to realize a true one-teamCYP at each installation, a CYP Director who is designated to have oversight over all CYPcomponents is required. In most cases, a CDC, CDH or Youth Director will be designated as aCYP Director with oversight of the installation CYP. A dedicated position is authorized atinstallations where all CYP components are classified as large programs. In metro areas, aRegional CYP Director assigned regional functions may be dual-hatted as the Installation CYPDirector for multiple installations.There are different options on how regions may choose to meet the requirement of theInstallation CYP Director. However, a person must be assigned to coordinate the followingfunctions at each installation.• Coordinate the use of staff across programs, including the use of a singular staffing schedule when applicable.• Ensure the T&C Specialist position is utilized across the programs in accordance with these management standards.• Ensure a child placement system, including a singular waiting list for all installation CYPs is established in accordance with CWL guidance.• Develop CYP SOPs across the installation that meet the requirements of the OPNAV 1700.9 and apply to all CYP components.• Provide CYP Professional and Parent Handbooks that cover all CY programs.• Coordinate an installation Parent Participation Plan, including a combined Parent Information Board (PIB) that is open to parents of all CYP components.• Coordinate a joint CYP Special Needs Review Board (SNRB) at the installation. 17
  • 24. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSWORKING ACROSS THE CYPThe staffing approach of using staff across all programs is based on the total CYP team concept.By operating with this concept, the Navy CYP benefits from the efficiencies and cost savingsgained, and directors and other CYP professionals have more opportunities to learn about andwork in all programs. The new standards allow for more equity between programs, provideadditional dual-hatted capabilities, are linked to ratios that enhance program quality and providecareer ladders for employees. The CYP staffing concept provides more well trained staff overallwhich is a benefit to children and families who are in the program 0-18. To maximize staffingefficiency a singular staffing schedule can be developed to provide consistency and equality ofstaffing across programs, see Appendix C, CYP Staffing Schedule Worksheet. This staffingschedule should be developed with input from directors of all component programs to ensure thatthe needs of all programs are considered.Direct Care StaffThe authorized full-time equivalent (FTE) for direct care staff for each CYP component isdetermined by the total number of direct staff hours that are needed to cover the program hoursbased on the appropriate staff ratio for the age group receiving care. Effectively managing thedirect staff FTE hours is a critical factor for successfully implementing the ManagementStandards. Each authorized FTE is based on 2,080 hours or 40 hours of direct staff hoursavailable each week. See Appendix D, CDC Staffing Schedule Worksheet, and Appendix E,SAC/YP Staffing Schedule Worksheet, in order to develop a staffing schedule for a CYPcomponent program.Once the number of required authorized FTE that is needed to cover program hours isdetermined, additional hours are authorized to cover staff turnover, annual training, planning andassessment requirements, and annual and sick leave hours. The following information should beused to determine the additional hours to be added to cover these requirements.• An average employee turnover rate of 27% for CDC and 50% for SAC has been established for all Navy employees.• New staff members require 62 hours of orientation training.• Each Navy CYP direct staff member is required to receive 48 hours of annual training.• CDC: There are two primary teachers assigned to each classroom. Each primary teacher shall receive two hours per week to prepare activity plans and conduct assessment activities.• Two hundred additional hours for each FTE to cover annual and sick leave is added. 18
  • 25. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSDirect care staff are not authorized to be in the programs during the day when children are notpresent (i.e., during school hours for SAC/Youth staff). By using staff across programs,opportunities become available for CYP Professionals who are currently working in SAC/Youthprograms to work during school time in CDC classrooms. CYP staffing also provides the CDCwith additional staff available to provide coverage due to training needs and/or absenteeism.Likewise, the SAC/Youth program can access flex staff currently working in the CDC who alsowould like to increase their hours. Additional benefits to direct care professionals includeopportunities for professional growth through expanded experiences, training, and opportunitiesto get to know more employees. All of these factors contribute to increased communicationacross programs thereby increasing morale and support for each other.Support StaffSupport staff includes those positions that provide management, administration, training, andfood service function for the CYP. The size of the CYP component determines the support staffthat is authorized. Chapter 2 provides information on how the size of the CYP component isdetermined. The Classified Position Description section in this chapter should be consulted foradditional information about all authorized positions.Table 3-1 provides information on the positions that are authorized for each size program basedon the Management Standards. There may be unique circumstances that require additionalpositions, e.g. a separate front desk area. Any positions above and beyond the standards must beauthorized by CNIC (N912) so additional funding can be authorized. Since the T&C position isbased on the number of “end strength,” it is discussed separately from the other supportpositions. 19
  • 26. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS TABLE 3-1: SUPPORT STAFF CDC Standard Authorized Positions Program GS-09 or NAF equivalent CDC Director with CYP Oversight (1 FTE) OR GS-09 or NAF equivalent CDC Director (1 FTE) Small WG-04 or NAF equivalent Cook (1 FTE – Full-time) GS-04 or NAF equivalent Operations Clerk (1.5 FTE – 1 Full-Time and .5 Flexible) GS-11 or NAF equivalent CDC Director with CYP Oversight (1 FTE) OR GS-09 or NAF equivalent CDC Director (1 FTE) GS-07 or NAF equivalent Assistant CDC Director (1 FTE) Medium WG-04 or NAF equivalent Cook (1 FTE – Full-Time) WG-01 or NAF equivalent Food Service Worker (.5 FTE - Flexible) GS-04 or NAF equivalent Operations Clerk (1.5 FTE – 1 Full-Time and .5 Flexible) GS-12 or NAF equivalent CDC Director with CYP Oversight (1 FTE) OR GS-11 or NAF equivalent CDC Director (1 FTE) GS-07 or NAF equivalent Assistant CDC Director (1 FTE) Large WG-04 or NAF equivalent Cook (1 FTE – Full-Time) WG-01 or NAF equivalent Food Service Worker (1 FTE – Flexible) GS-04 or NAF equivalent Operations Clerk (2 FTE – 2 Full-Time) SAC Standard Authorized Positions Program GS-09 or NAF equivalent Youth Director with CYP Oversight (1 FTE) OR GS-09 or NAF equivalent Youth Director (1 FTE) Small GS-04 or NAF equivalent Operations Clerk (1 FTE – 1 Full-Time or 2 Part- Time) GS-11 or NAF equivalent Youth Director with CYP Oversight (1 FTE) OR GS-09 or NAF equivalent Youth Director (1 FTE) Medium GS-07 or NAF equivalent Assistant Youth Director (1 FTE) GS-04 or NAF equivalent Operations Clerk (1 FTE – 1 Full-Time or 2 Part- Time) GS-12 or NAF equivalent Youth Director with CYP Oversight (1 FTE) OR GS-11 or NAF equivalent Youth Director (1 FTE) Large GS-07 or NAF equivalent Assistant Youth Director (1 FTE) GS-04 or NAF equivalent Operations Clerk (1.5 FTE – 1 Full-Time and 1 Part Time)20
  • 27. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS TABLE 3-1: SUPPORT STAFF CDH Standard Authorized Positions Program If number of homes exceed 20 then: GS-09 or NAF equivalent CDH Director with CYP Oversight (1 FTE) OR GS-09 or NAF equivalent CDH Director (1 FTE) Small If number of homes is less than 20 then: GS-07 or NAF equivalent CDH Monitor (1 FTE) GS-11 or NAF equivalent CDH Director with CYP Oversight (1 FTE) OR GS-09 or NAF equivalent CDH Director (1 FTE) GS-07 or NAF equivalent CDH Monitor (FTE determined by number of Medium homes) GS-04 or NAF equivalent Operations Clerk (.5 FTE) This position is authorized only if the CDH program is NOT co-located with another CYP program, i.e. located at the CDC GS-11 or NAF equivalent CDH Director with CYP Oversight (1 FTE) OR GS-11 or NAF equivalent CDH Director (1 FTE) Large GS-07 or NAF equivalent CDH Monitor (FTE determined by the number of homes) GS-04 or NAF equivalent Operations Clerk (1 FTE)CYP TRAININGThe key to the successful use of staff across programs is the provision of cross CYP training. Amajor change to the CYP as part of the CYP MS is the addition of Training & CurriculumSpecialist FTE authorization for use across all CY programs. The role of the CYP T&CSpecialist is critical to staff having the knowledge and competence to provide quality care andprogramming in all settings. The Military Child Care Act (MCCA) requires all programs toprovide the highest quality of programs to military members. The only way to ensure qualityprograms is through the use of high-quality CYP Professionals. The roles and responsibilities ofthe T&C position are critical to the goals established for Navy CYP. The CYP MS authorizesadditional T&C positions as part of the Navy’s commitment to the professional growth andeducation of CYP Professionals and to the goal of continuous quality improvement.Because the T&C Specialist will work across the CYP, additional position descriptions havebeen created to meet this need. New position descriptions include a T&C Specialist with new jobqualifications and an Assistant T&C Specialist. As required by the MCCA, a T&C Specialistmeeting the specific Early Childhood Education (ECE) degree requirements must be assigned toeach CDC. As defined in Table 3-2, the requirements for additional T&C positions encompass a 21
  • 28. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSbroader set of degree requirements. The following section provides information on the roles andresponsibilities of the T&C position within each CYP component and explains how the FTE forthe T&C Specialist is determined.New staff should be oriented to the whole CYP system and provided with basic informationwhich can be applied in all settings. On-going training whether for required annual training,completion of modules or additional training that might be provided by the installation or regionshould be inclusive of all CYP professionals whenever possible. Within each training topic it isessential to provide information that is relevant to each of the age groups being serviced so thatspecific implementation strategies can be supplied into the various settings.The Role of the Training and Curriculum SpecialistMany opportunities exist across the CYP for group trainings and cross-component training;however, it is critical that training topics be designed to assist CYP Professionals in caring forthe age group of children that they work with regularly. The T&C Specialist FTE authorizationis based on the number of staff across all CYP components. To facilitate the use of the T&CSpecialist across the program, the position shall work directly for the designated installation CYPDirector. Because the need of each CYP components varies, so does the role of the T&CSpecialist. The number of staff members that the T&C Specialist can provide support to variesacross the programs. The level of support needed at each CYP component was the keyconsideration in determining the number of T&C billets to be authorized by the CYP MS. Thefollowing is a summary of the duties that the T&C Specialist is responsible for at each CYPcomponent, but is in no way inclusive of all areas that their expertise will be used.Child Development Centers and Child Development Group Homes – The T&C Specialist plays acritical role in the implementation and execution of the Creative Curriculum System, includingassisting teachers with observations and assessments, evaluating classroom environments,reviewing weekly activity plans, and providing additional training when needed. The T&CSpecialist should be a very visible part of day to day operations in the classroom. Additionally,the T&C Specialist is responsible for ensuring required monthly training is completed andproperly documented, identifying training needs, completing monthly classroom observationsand working with teachers to ensure modules are completed. The T&C Specialist encourages andprovides support to employee’s career growth, including assistance in obtaining ChildDevelopment Associate (CDA) credential and attending applicable college courses.Child Development Homes – Responsible for assisting the CDH Director with orientationtrainings for new CDH providers and coordinating monthly trainings for all CDH Providers. TheT&C Specialist will maintain up-to-date training files for all CDH Providers, including 22
  • 29. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSdocumentation of module completion. The T&C Specialist assists the CDH program with alltraining needs, including the development of ways to encourage providers to become accredited,to complete modules, and to implement program requirements as needed. As part of the CDHMonitor’s home visit each month, the CDH Monitor is responsible for working with the provideron the environment, assisting and documenting the completion of modules, and encouraging theprovider to become NAFCC accredited. The ratio of 1 CDH Monitor to every 30 CDH Providershas been established in consideration of these duties. The T&C Specialist is available to providespecific training and guidance to CDH Providers and CDH Monitors as needed.SAC and Youth – The T&C Specialist assists the SAC and Youth Programs by ensuringorientation and monthly training is completed. The T&C Specialist will ensure all training filesare maintained and up-to-date. Additionally, the T&C Specialist will work with the director toensure employee modules are completed in the required time frame, make suggestions to theenvironment as needed and assist in the accreditation process. The T&C Specialist encouragesand provides support to employee’s career growth, including assistance in obtaining the MilitarySchool-Age Credential (MSA) and attending applicable college courses.For the purpose of determining number of T&C positions, therefore we use the followingguidelines in Table 3-2 for “end-strength” which represents the level of responsibility of theT&C Specialist for training. The authorized number of T&C positions is a compilation ofrequirements across the installation or metro CYP. 23
  • 30. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS TABLE 3-2: CYP T&C SPECIALIST AUTHORIZATION CYP Component T&C Specialist FTE Authorization Child Development Centers 1 T&C Specialist : 40 Employee End Strength Child Development Group Homes 1 T&C Specialist : 40 Employee End Strength Child Development Homes 1 T&C Specialist : 80 CDH Providers School Age Care & Youth Programs 1 T&C Specialist : 80 Employee End Strength CYP T&C SPECIALIST AUTHORIZATION CALCULATION EXAMPLE The number of CYP T&C Specialists authorized for the installation or metro CYP is calculated as acompilation of the standards set for each program. The following is an example of how to calculate the authorization for an installation CYP. CDC has 30 total employees 30 employees / 40 = .75 CDH has 20 providers 20 providers / 80 = .25 SAC & YP has 30 employees 30 employees / 80 = .37 CYP is T&C authorization is 1.37 Authorized positions: T&C Specialist authorized for up to a requirement of 1.0 T&C Assistant T&C Specialist authorized for requirements of 1.0 to 1.5 T&C In this example, the installation CYP is authorized 1 T&C Specialist (ECE) position and 1 Assistant T&C Specialist position. Additional information is provided under the position description section.Note: End strength is not to be confused with FTE, which refers to number of hours worked. Forexample, two staff working 20 hours a week is equal to one FTE; however, the same two staff membersare equal to two end-strength in terms of responsibility of the T&C Specialist for training requirements. 24
  • 31. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSSTANDARD AGENCY CLASSIFIED POSITIONDESCRIPTIONSCNIC will provide standardized position descriptions (PD) for all positions. These PDs must beutilized by all programs. If programs have a requirement that is not covered here, the PD must beapproved by CNIC (N912). The proposed series and grades listed in Table 3-3 are subject tochange based on official classification of the position description.Programs are encouraged to convert vacant APF positions to NAF positions, maximizing the useof APF through the UFM process. TABLE 3-3: AGENCY CLASSIFIED POSITIONS AND GRADES (* INDICATES NEW POSITIONS) Appropriated Fund Series and Grades Non-Appropriated Position Title - Regional Positions (These will be Fund Series and classified under the Grades NSPS system)Regional CYP Manager GS-0301-13 NF-0301-05Regional CYP Director GS-1701-12 NF-1701-04Assigned to specific installations and responsiblefor encouraging the CYP concept, as well asproviding regional support as assignedRegional Resource and Referral Director GS-1701-09 NF-1701-04Regional T&C Specialist GS-1701-11 NF-1701-04Regional CDH Director (Metro Areas Only) GS-1701-11 NF-1701-04Regional USDA Clerk (Funded by USDA) NF-0303-03Regional Program Analyst GS-0343-11 NF-0343-11 Appropriated Fund Series and Grades Non-Appropriated Position Title - Installation Positions (These will be Fund Series and classified under the Grades NSPS system )Installation CYP Director GS-1701-11 NF-1701-04CDC Director – Large CDC GS-1701-11 NF-1701-04CDC Director w/ CYP Oversight - Large CDC GS-1701-12 NF-1701-04CDH Director - Large CDH Program GS-1701-11 NF-1701-04CDH Director w/ CYP Oversight - Large CDH GS-1701-11 NF-1701-04ProgramYouth Director - Large Youth/SAC Program GS-1701-11 NF-1701-04Youth Director w/ CYP Oversight - Large SAC GS-1701-12 NF-1701-04Program 25
  • 32. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS TABLE 3-3: AGENCY CLASSIFIED POSITIONS AND GRADES (* INDICATES NEW POSITIONS) Appropriated Fund Series and Grades Non-Appropriated Position Title - Installation Positions (These will be Fund Series and classified under the Grades NSPS system )CDC Director - Small or Medium CDC GS-1701-09 NF-1701-04CDC Director w/ CYP Oversight - Small CDC GS-1701-09 NF-1701-04CDC Director w/CYP Oversight – Medium CDC GS-1701-11 NF-1701-04CDH Director - Small or Medium CDH Program GS-1701-09 NF-1701-04CDH Director w/ CYP Oversight - Small or GS-1701-09 NF-1701-04Medium CDHYouth Director - Small or Medium SAC Program GS-1701-09 NF-1701-04Youth Director w/ CYP Oversight - Small SAC GS-1701-09 NF-1701-04Youth Director w/CYP Oversight – Medium SAC GS-1701-11 NF-1701-04CYP Training & Curriculum Specialist (Early GS-1701-09 NF-1701-04Childhood Education)One GS position with an ECE degree is required ateach CDC*CYP Training & Curriculum Specialist GS-1701-09 NF-1701-04This position will NOT require an ECE*CYP Assistant Training & Curriculum Specialist GS-1702-07 NF-1702-03 This position will NOT require an ECE*CYP Assistant Director GS-1702-07 NF-1702-03CDH Monitor GS-1702-07 NF-1702-03CDC Program Supervisor (Annex facilities only) GS-1702-07 NF-1702-03CYP Teen Coordinator GS-1702-07 NF-1702-03CYP Sports Coordinator GS-1702-07 NF-1702-03CYP Teen/Sports Coordinator GS-1702-07 NF-1702-03CYP Leader GS-1702-05 CY-1702-II (GSE-05)CYP Program Assistants GS -1702- 02/03/04 CY-1702-II/I (GSE-02/03/04)CYP Summer Youth Program Assistants GS -1702-02 CY-1702-I (GSE-02)CYP Operations Clerk GS-0303-04 NF-0303-02USDA Clerk (only if reimbursed by USDA) NF-0303-03CYP Cook NA-7404-08CYP Food Service Worker NA-7404-04CYP Custodian NA-3566-02CYP School Liaison Officer – Small GS-1701-09 NF-1701-04CYP School Liaison Officer – Medium/Large GS-1701-11 NF-1701-04 26
  • 33. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSSTANDARDS FOR CYP REGIONAL POSITIONSRegional CYP Manager (NF-0301-05 or GS-0301-13)• This position is the CYP Manager for the entire region.• The Regional CYP Manager is the CNIC RAB member.• The responsibilities of this position are determined by the needs of the region based on geographic location of programs, size of the regional CYP, and the span and control authority of the incumbent.• All Regional positions must be approved by CNIC (N912).Regional CYP Director (NF-1701-04 or GS-1701-12)• This position has CYP oversight for multiple installations (normally in a metro region area) as well as being assigned other regional duties. For example, this person, in addition to installation CYP responsibilities, may be assigned to coordinate regional training requirements, to write regional SOPs and handbooks, and/or to assist with other functions as required by the needs of the region.• Responsible for the duties mentioned above for the Installation CYP Director. This is an option for metro areas to have a designated CYP Director over multiple installations – (meets the intent of the CYP Director at each installation.)• If this position is established at a regional level, a dedicated Installation CYP Director or a CYP Director with oversight is NOT authorized at the installation level.• All Regional positions must be approved by CNIC (N912).Regional Resource and Referral Director (NF-1701-04 or GS-1701-09)• All regions are encouraged to coordinate R&R requirements at a regional level. Although the actual wait lists may be maintained at the installation level. This person coordinates with the National Association of Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies (NACCRRA), ensures spaces are properly managed, and seeks creative methods for ensuring the needs of the command are met.• In a metro area, this person is responsible for the placement of children across all programs within multiple installations. 27
  • 34. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS• Handles marketing and advertisement of programs within the assigned area.• Provides consultations to parents about child care available within the area, etc.• All regional positions must be approved by CNIC (N912).Regional Training & Curriculum Specialist (NF-1701-04 or GS-1701-11)• This position assists the CYP regionally by coordinating training that maximizes the use of T&C Specialist positions and funding.• This position will normally be authorized in a metro-regional area. The FTE for this person must be included in the overall T&C authorized number. The CYP Training section provides additional information on how the authorized FTE for T&C Specialist positions are determined.• The assigned T&C Specialist positions in the metro-regional area may report directly to the Regional T&C Specialist position.• All regional positions must be approved by CNIC (N912).Regional Program Analyst (NF-0343-04 or GS-0343-11)• This position is authorized to assist CYP Directors in coordinating data calls, collecting data, formulating budgets, and assisting with a wide-range of administrative duties.• All regional positions must be approved by CNIC (N912).Regional CDH Director (NF-1701-04 or GS-1701-11)• This position is responsible for coordinating a metro-area CDH program.• This position is only authorized in metro areas where there are over 30 homes. Additional CDH Director positions are not authorized at the installations serviced. In accordance with the monitoring requirements for CDH, additional CDH monitors may be added as needed.• All regional positions must be approved by CNIC (N912).Regional USDA Operations Clerk (NF-0303-03)• This position can assist the region by coordinating USDA functions across multiple CYP components and/or installations and assisting programs in maximizing USDA reimbursement.• This position is only authorized if approved by USDA and funding is provided. 28
  • 35. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSSTANDARDS FOR CYP INSTALLATION POSITIONSThe Region will need to determine the positions needed at each location based on the guidanceprovided within this document.Guidance for Assignment of CYP Oversight and Dual-Hat PositionsA determination will be made concerning which positions will be dual-hatted and which directorposition is the best choice for having CYP oversight. The determination of these issues should bebased on knowledge of the size and distribution of workload among all programs.Installation CYP Program Director (NF-1701-04 or GS-1701-11)• This position has CYP oversight for a large installation.• Responsible for administration duties, distributing information, data calls, singular work schedule, CYP marketing, R&R, etc. for one installation. Additionally, this position is responsible for ensuring that the authorized T&C Specialist positions workload is distributed among the CYP components as required.• This can be a stand-alone position at an installation where all programs are considered “large” (CDC, CDH, SAC/Youth programs all meet criteria for “large” programs).STANDARDS FOR CYP PROFESSIONAL POSITIONS INEACH CYP COMPONENTCYP Director PositionsCDC Director (NF-1701-04 or GS-1701-11)• CDC Director for a Large CDC (200+ children).• CDC Director may assume CDH Director responsibilities for <10 CD homes and may delegate monitoring duties to the CYP Assistant Director.CDC Director w/ CYP Oversight (NF-1701-04 or GS-1701-12)• CDC Director for a Large CDC with installation CYP Oversight.• Oversight to include: CDCs, CDH, SAC, Youth, R&R. 29
  • 36. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS• If responsibility of this position includes a directing a large facility, oversight of large CYP and <10 CD homes, a part-time CDH Monitor may be authorized.CDC Director (NF-1701-04 or GS-1701-09)• CDC Director for a Small CDC (up to 100 children) or Medium CDC (101-199 children).• CDC Director may assume CDH Director responsibilities for <10 CD homes.• At a small CYP, a CDC Director may be dual-hatted T&C Specialist only if the combined installation CYP is less than 60 children and the end strength for all installation CYP is less than 20. An Assistant T&C Specialist (GS-07) is an option under this circumstance only if the CYP consist of multiple components.CDC Director with CYP Oversight (NF-1701-04 or GS-1701-09)• CDC Director for a Small CDC with installation CYP Oversight.• Oversight to include CDCs, CDH, SAC, Youth, R&R• If overall size of CYP is “large,” this position would be authorized a GS-11.CDC Director with CYP Oversight (NF-1701-04 or GS-1701-11)• CDC Director for a Medium CDC with installation CYP Oversight.• Oversight to include CDCs, CDH, SAC, Youth, R&RCDH Director (NF-1701-04 or GS-1701-11)• CDH Director for a Large CDH program (86+ homes).• Visits 10% of caseload of each CDH Monitor monthly for quality assurance.CDH Director w/ CYP Oversight (NF-1701-04 or GS-1701-11)• CDH Director for a Large CDH program with installation CYP Oversight.• CDH Director may be assigned oversight of a Medium or Large CYP to include: CDC, CDH, SAC, Youth, R&R.• Visits 10% of caseload of each CDH Monitor monthly for quality assurance. 30
  • 37. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSCDH Director (NF-1701-04 or GS-1701-09)• CDH Director for a Small or Medium CDH program.• A full-time CDH Director position is not activated until there are 20 in-process and/or certified CD homes. A CDC Director will assume responsibilities until CDH position is activated. If the number of homes is less than 10, the duties of the CDH Director should be included in the CDC or Youth Director’s responsibilities. If the number of homes is between 10 and 20, a CDH Monitor position is authorized under the direction of the installation CYP Director.• Maintains caseload of up to 29 CD homes. OPNAV 1700.9 provides additional guidance about CDH caseloads.CDH Director with Oversight (NF-1701-04 or GS-1701-09)• CDH Director for a Small (up to 29 CD Homes) or Medium (30-85 Homes) CDH program with installation CYP Oversight. A CDH Director is not authorized until the total number of homes is equal to 20.• CDH Director may be assigned oversight of a Small CYP to include: CDC, CDH, SAC/Youth, and R&R programs.Youth Director (NF-1701-04 or GS-1701-11)• Youth Director for a Large SAC/Youth Program.• Youth Director may assume CDH Director responsibilities for <10 CD homes.• Because the Youth Program standards are still under development, the scope of current YP responsibilities should be considered when determining the grade of this position.Youth Director w/ CYP Oversight (NF-1701-04 or GS-1701-12)• Youth Director for a Large SAC/Youth program with installation CYP Oversight.• Oversight to include: CDCs, CDH, SAC, Youth, R&R.• Because the Youth Program standards are still under development, the scope of current YP responsibilities should be considered when determining the grade of this position. 31
  • 38. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSYouth Director (NF-1701-04 or GS-1701-09)• Youth Director for a Small or Medium SAC/Youth Program.• At a small CYP, a Youth Director may be dual-hatted T&C Specialist only if the combined installation CYP is less than 60 children and the end strength for all installation CYP is less than 20. An Assistant T&C Specialist (GS-07) is an option under this circumstance only if the CYP consists of multiple components. If the CYP consists of a CDC, the degree requirements for the T&C Specialist must be met.• Because the Youth Program standards are still under development, the scope of current YP responsibilities should be considered when determining the grade of this position.Youth Director with Oversight (NF-1701-04 or GS-1701-09)• Youth Director for a Small SAC/Youth Program with installation CYP Oversight.• Oversight to include: CDCs, CDH, SAC, Youth, R&R.• Because the Youth Program standards are still under development, the scope of current YP responsibilities should be considered when determining the grade of this position.Youth Director with Oversight (NF-1701-04 or GS-1701-11)• Youth Director for a Medium SAC/Youth Program with installation CYP Oversight.• Oversight to include: CDCs, CDH, SAC, Youth, R&R.• Because the Youth Program standards are still under development, the scope of current YP responsibilities should be considered when determining the grade of this position.Training & Curriculum (T&C) Specialist PositionsThe number T&C Specialist positions authorized are determined based on the combined trainingneeds of the CYP components. The method for determining the number of positions is illustratedin Table 3-2. The number and qualifications of positions needed will be determined based on theinstallation or metro area served.CYP Training & Curriculum Specialist (Early Childhood Education) (NF-1701-04 or GS-1701-09)• One APF funded position meeting the 4-year degree requirements specified in the position description is required to be assigned to each CDC. 32
  • 39. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS• The CYP T&C Specialist (ECE) is authorized up to 1.0 of a T&C position as illustrated in Table 3-2. If the additional requirement is less than .5, an Assistant T&C position is authorized. For example if the total T&C requirement is 2.35, two T&C Specialists and one Assistant T&C Specialist are authorized.• Serves total CYP and reports to CYP Director with CYP oversight or the Regional T&C Specialist in a metro area.CYP Training & Curriculum Specialist (NF-1701-04 or GS-1701-09)• This position will NOT require an ECE degree, but may have a 4-year degree in a related field that is appropriate across the CYP (i.e., education, psychology, etc.) as specified in the position description.• The CYP T&C Specialist is authorized up to 1.0 of a T&C position as illustrated in Table 3- 2. If the additional requirement is less than .5, an Assistant T&C position is authorized. For example if the total T&C requirement is 2.35, two T&C Specialists and one Assistant T&C Specialist are authorized.• Serves total CYP and reports to Director with CYP oversight.CYP Assistant Training & Curriculum Specialist (NF-1702-03 or GS-1702-07)• This is an assistant – entry level position with opportunity for advancement. It is preferred that the incumbent have a minimum of a 2-year degree or a CDA/MSA and 3 years of experience in the child and youth profession.• This position is authorized when the additional requirement of the T&C authorization is less than .5. For example, if the total requirement of T&C positions authorized is 2.35. The installation or metro-area is authorized two T&C Specialist positions and one Assistant T&C Specialist position.• Serves total CYP and reports to Director with CYP oversight.CYP Assistant Director (NF-1702-03 or GS-1702-07)• This position is authorized for Medium and Large CDC or SAC programs.• This is an assistant – entry level position with opportunity for advancement. It is preferred that the incumbent have a minimum of a 2-year degree or a CDA/MSA and 3 years of experience in the child and youth profession.• Opportunity for advancement for GS-5, allowing for upward mobility. 33
  • 40. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS• May assume CDH monitoring responsibilities for <10 CD homes.CDC Program Supervisor (Annex facilities only) (NF-1702-03 or GS-1702-07)• On-site supervisor only for CDC or SAC adjacent or annex locations (Operates as a stand alone facility on the installation and is usually geographically separated).• Under the oversight of a GS-09 or GS-11 level Director.• Performs CYP Leader duties if enrollment <50.• Capacity of open classrooms or prorated SAC enrollment included in total for determining size of the CYP component.CDH Monitor (NF-1702-03 or GS-1702-07)• The number of positions required to perform CDH monitoring duties is determined based on the requirement of 1 CDH Monitor every 30 certified and in-process CD homes. In-process homes are defined in the CYP size section in Chapter 2.• A CDH Monitor is authorized when the number of in-process or certified homes reaches 20. (unless < 10 homes and the CDC Director is dual-hatted as mentioned above).CYP Teen Coordinator (NF-1702-03 or GS-1702-07)• This position works under the Youth Director and is responsible for a Medium or Large teen program.• Every Youth program should have a position dedicated to teens (can be dual-hatted with Sports Coordinator or other position).• This position should be in ratio 40% of the time with the remaining time within the facility and/or program activities to be available to youth, parents and staff.CYP Sports Coordinator (NF-1702-03 or GS-1702-07)• This position works under the Youth Director and is responsible for a medium or large sports and fitness program.• Every Youth program should have a position dedicated to sports and fitness (can be dual- hatted with Teen Coordinator or other position). 34
  • 41. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS• This position should be in ratio 40% of the time with the remaining time within the facility and/or program activities during the time in which children and youth are present in order to be available to children, youth, parents and staff.CYP Teen/Sports Coordinator (NF-1702-03 or GS-1702-07)• This position works under the Youth Director and is responsible for the teen and sports program where each individual program does not warrant a separate position.• This position should be in ratio 40% of the time with the remaining time within the facility and/or program activities during the time in which children and youth are present in order to be available to children, youth, parents and staff.CYP Leader (CY-1702-II (GSE-05) or GS-1702-05)• There is one CYP Leader for every 50 children.• For CDC, these are previously known as Child Development Program Leaders.• For SAC, these are the positions previously known as the SAC Coordinators.• This person is counted in direct care ratio 80% of the time – this time is spent in classrooms or SAC activity rooms modeling, providing direct care, and assisting with improvements in the environment and program.• For CDC, Leaders do not need to be assigned a primary group of children.• 20% time out of ratio is for providing administrative support and/or assistance with training.• This is the first step in upward mobility for Program Assistants.CYP Program Asst (CY-1702-II/I (GSE-02/03/04) or GS -1702-02/03/04)• These are direct care staff.• Number determined by required ratios.• For CDC, 2 full-time Program Assistants should be assigned to each classroom.• No more than 25% of positions designated as flexible staff is recommended.• Whenever possible, at least one GS/GSE-4 should be available in each classroom or to a group of children. 35
  • 42. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS• The CY Pay Plan provides additional information about required training to progress from GS/GSE 2 to the target 4 level.CYP Summer Program Asst (CY-1702-II/I (GSE-02) or GS -1702-02)• Direct care staff in summer SAC programs.• Positions will be brought in at rate of pay equivalent to a GS-02 salary, however, if they return from year to year and complete training requirements they can be brought back at the higher level.CYP Operations Clerk (NF-0303-02 or GS-0303-04)• The Operations Clerk position can be at any of the CYP – R&R, CDC, CDH, Youth, and SAC.• This position can be used across programs and should be cross-trained and able to work in CDC, CDH, SAC/Youth programs using a CYP system.• CYP Operations Clerks should be used across the programs. Clerks are only authorized when there are children in the facility for Youth/SAC and CDC. For SAC, this position is not authorized hours when children are not present in the facility. Full-time staff shall be shared across the CYP or part-time or flex staff shall be utilized.CYP Cook (NA-7404-08)• One cook is authorized at each CDC if food is prepared at the facility.• This position should be provided full-time status to assist with retention.CYP Food Service Worker (NA-7404-04)• In addition to the cook, .5 FTE is authorized at a Medium CDC and 1.0 FTE is authorized at a Large CDC.• If applicable, this position is authorized part-time or full-time status to assist with retention.• Provides support for cook.USDA Clerk (NF-0303-03)• Only if reimbursed by USDA.• Requirements for this position vary by state. 36
  • 43. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSCYP Custodian (NA-3566-02)• Position exists if there is no base cleaning contract to serve the CYP. Every effort should be made by CYP management to ensure CYP facilities are included in the base custodial contract. If services cannot be completed through the base cleaning contract, efforts and the reason for disapproval by the command should be documented and maintained.• When custodial services are not provided by the command, one custodian for every 200 children is authorized.CYP School Liaison Officer PositionsSchool Liaison Officer (NF-1701-04 or GS-1701-11)• School Liaison Officer for Medium and Large installations/regions.• School Liaison Officers may have responsibility for more than one installation in metro areas.School Liaison Officer (NF-1701-04 or GS-1701-09)• School Liaison Officer for small installations.• School Liaison Officers may have responsibility for more than one installation in metro areas. 37
  • 44. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS38
  • 45. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS IV. Non-Labor ExpensesNon-labor expenses include all costs to the program other than labor. Supplies, equipment,transportation, food are just a few of these costs. Controlling non-labor costs can be challengingand is often one of the first areas to be cut during budget shortfalls. All programs are required toprovide nutritious meals and snacks that meet USDA meal patterns. Food service can be an areawhere controlling costs can be especially challenging, but if properly managed, is also an areawhere savings can be realized for the overall CYP. In this chapter, we will provide:• Food service standards.• Basic information about the USDA Child and Adult Care Food Program.• Examples of ways to work across CYP.• Descriptions of common non-labor expenses.• Management Standards for Per Child Navy Standard Amounts for Non-Labor Expenses – See Table 4-1.FOOD SERVICE STANDARDSFood service standards are based on industry employer sponsored norms and include bestbusiness practices and lessons learned by industry and other military child and youth programs.Employer sponsored programs provide meals through their own cafeterias or use cateringservices. The cost for catered meals is approximately $3.80 per child per day. The industry costsfor food are estimated at 4.88% of total overall costs. The 2002 Rand Study found the averagecosts per child for food for CDC in military programs to be $502 per year which inflates to $604for the year 2008 and $272 per child for SAC. The actual cost for food will vary by geographicarea.Not-for-profit programs, such as the military, are able to participate in the USDA Child andAdult Care Food Program (CACFP) which sets standards for meals and snacks and providestiered reimbursement for food costs depending on the income of the families in the programs.CHILD AND ADULT CARE FOOD PROGRAM (CACFP)OPNAV requires the CYP to provide nutritionally appropriate meals and snacks that meetUSDA CACFP guidelines and meal patterns. Each CYP shall participate in the USDA CACFP 39
  • 46. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSreimbursement program to the fullest extent possible for the area in which the program islocated. All CYP components including CDH homes must serve meals and snacks that meetUSDA CACFP guidelines and meal patterns. Food substitutes must meet USDA guidelines andshould be posted on all menus prior to meal service. Although the same criteria are required foroverseas locations, reimbursement is not available to them at this time.USDA Standards for Meals and SnacksThe USDA Standards for Meals and Snacks ensure that agencies receiving reimbursementthrough CACFP are serving balanced, nutritious meals. Standards are categorized according tothe ages of the persons being served. These categories are (a) infants ages birth through 11months; (b) children ages 1 to 12; and (c) adults. These standards can be found on the USDAwebsite at: http://www.fns.usda.gov/cnd/care/ProgramBasics/Meals/Meal_Patterns.htm.Food Service Guidelines for CDC• USDA meal patterns shall include regular meals, as well as snacks. This includes breakfast, lunch and/or supper and snacks.• For programs with children 1-5 years old, there shall be no more than 3 hours or less than 2 hours between regular meals and snacks.• When children attend the CYP during alternative childcare hours (nights or evenings), appropriate meals will be provided.• Meal times are an integral part of a developmentally appropriate curriculum. They should be relaxed and served with adequate time allowed for socializing.• OPNAV 1700.9 provides additional information about food service requirements.Food Service Guidelines for SAC• The SAC program shall provide meals and snacks that are appropriate for the hours the children are at the program and the kitchen facilities that are available.• Each Before School Program that is open for a minimum of 1½ hours shall offer breakfast to children.• Each After School Program shall offer a mid-afternoon snack.• Full-day camp programs shall offer a breakfast, mid-morning and mid-afternoon snack. Lunch is usually brought from home due to limited kitchen facilities in SAC facilities. 40
  • 47. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS• Since the majority of SAC facilities do not have kitchen facilities, programs may purchase individually wrapped single serving size portions. Paper products are authorized in SAC programs.• OPNAV 1700.9 provides additional information about food service requirements.Food Service Guidelines for CDH• CDH Providers can receive meal reimbursements if they are enrolled in the USDA program• CDH homes must serve meals and snacks that meet USDA CACFP guidelines and meal patterns• The CYP can be reimbursed for some of the costs of administering the CDH reimbursement program.WORKING ACROSS THE CYPFor the CYP, there are many steps that can be taken to improve efficiencies in relation to foodcosts and inventories. Even though some costs are reimbursed by USDA, the preparation andserving of food is definitely an area where costs can get out of control due to lack of planningand organization. The following tips help to control these costs:• Maintain one central inventory of food in order to reduce the amount of food ordered and the amount wasted.• Place bulk orders whenever possible.• Place orders together to reduce delivery costs. This also helps program share resources when substitutions to the menu are necessary.• Develop tracking methods/forms across the CYP to ensure all expenses are captured.• Develop a process to ensure all staff conduct meal service counts accurately.• Develop cycles of CYP menus that meet USDA requirements and coordinate meals and snacks between programs whenever possible.SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENTSupplies are items that are generally used and replenished within one year or less. Examples mayinclude paper, glue, paint, soap, napkins, craft materials, some toys, diapers, and cleaning 41
  • 48. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSsupplies. Software for computers also falls under this heading. Too often, this is the first areawhere budgets are cut. It is important to remember that adequate classroom supplies are criticalfor a quality program. Children need to paint, draw, read, and create. School-age children oftenare very focused on arts and crafts activities and may need many more consumable art suppliesthan the preschool program.Equipment is described as an item that will be used for more than one year. Generally, it includesfurniture for children and adults, larger toys, computers, appliances, and playground equipment,as well as office furnishings and other office equipment. Careful decisions must be made on theimportance of quality and durability of equipment. Operational budgets should includeallocations for future purchases and replacement of equipment. When ordering equipment, it isimportant to verify that it adheres to Consumer Product Safety (CPSC) Guidelines(www.cpsc.org), OPNAV requirements, and American Society for Testing and Materials(ASTM) standards. Safety must be a top priority in equipping centers. Avoid equipment that canpose a safety risk to children.Ordering the appropriate amount of both supplies and equipment that meet the developmentalneeds of the children in care requires considerable and thoughtful planning. The supplies andequipment needed varies by program and is determined by curriculum requirements,accreditation criteria, and the OPNAV. Outdoor play equipment and appropriate sportsequipments is essential to providing quality activities for children and youth. Understanding theinterests and developmental needs for each age group is critical to ordering the correct type andnumber of supplies. Supplies and equipment can be rotated among rooms and also amongprograms if they are in a metro area, they should never be sitting in closets and in storage. Allprograms should meet the requirements for equipment and supplies for the chosen curriculumand to meet accreditation criteria.CDCThe chosen curriculum for all CDC programs is The Creative Curriculum. Within the CreativeCurriculum System, there is guidance for the types of materials and toys necessary to create anappropriate learning environment for the varying developmental needs of children in thesesettings. The Implementation Checklist, which accompanies The Creative Curriculum System,gives specific examples of the types and amount of toys and materials needed to supply eachinterest area of the classroom. Following the guidelines in the Implementation Checklist willalso meet the requirements of NAEYC accreditation criteria. 42
  • 49. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSCDHCDH Providers are also expected to provide developmentally appropriate programs and to seekaccreditation through NAFCC. While the program is to have the look and feel of a home, itshould also provide the materials and toys that meet the needs of the children within the settingand allow the provider to carry out the planned activities. There should be enough supplies forthe number of children being cared for in the home and the toys and materials should beappropriate for the age whether caring for infants, toddlers, preschool or school age children.Accreditation criteria, The Creative Curriculum, and inspection criteria all provide guidelines.As independent business owners, CDH Providers are responsible for ensuring their programmeets Navy requirements. In order to assist CDH Providers, the CYP is required to maintain alending library of toys and equipment that can be borrowed by CDH Providers and rotatedthroughout the program. In order to control costs, the CYP must develop a control system toensure that items are properly accounted for and maintained.SACSAC programs are to be accredited by NAA. Within the accreditation criteria are guidelines forthe types of materials and supplies needed, the quantity that should be provided and the conditionthat the materials and supplies should be in. Once again, it is essential that the materials, games,computer software, etc. be appropriate for the age of the children and youth. The ages in SACrange from 5 (Kindergarten) to 12 so a review of the materials is essential in terms of what andhow much is available for different age groups and interests.Youth ProgramsYouth programs are mandated to be affiliated with the BGCA and offer all of the core BGCAprograms. To fulfill this mandate all Youth programs must provide all required materials andsupplies to carry out all of the activities of the core BGCA programs. In addition, materials andsupplies must be provided in sufficient quantity to support other activities that are planned by theyouth to meet their particular needs and/or interests.MAXIMIZING EFFICIENCES FOR SUPPLIES ANDEQUIPMENTTo maximize efficiencies, the following guidelines can be used across the CYP:• Establish a centralized inventory of equipment and supplies for the CYP. 43
  • 50. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS• In order to reduce costs, consolidate orders for CYP supplies and equipment to facilitate bulk ordering.• Plan ahead. Often Navy programs have little money for long periods of time and then, at the end of year they have to spend a large sum at one time. If Directors plan ahead they can have a list of equipment and supplies needed ready for these occasions.COSTS FOR SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENTManagement standards have been developed for many non-labor expense categories based onindustry standards and historical data. Table 4-1 itemizes these expenses and shows the inflatedamounts from FY08 through FY13. In some cases, a program may have requirements beyondthose shown here. A request for additional funding for these requirements, includingjustification, can be submitted to CNIC for approval.Because the types of programs and activities offered for sports and teens vary throughout theNavy, management standards for non-labor expenses in these programs have not been set. TABLE 4-1: COST PER CHILD FOR NON-LABOR EXPENSES FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 FY2011 FY2012 FY2013 ITEM Cost/ Cost/ Cost/ Cost/ Cost/ Cost/ Child/Year Child/Year Child/Year Child/Year Child/Year Child/Year CDC & CDGH NON-LABOR EXPENSESCDC classroom supplies(e.g. toys, books, puzzles,paper, paint) $106.74 $109.09 $111.39 $113.65 $115.92 $118.25CDC Minor Equipment(<1K) (replacement) (e.g.tables, chairs, cubbies,riding toys) $118.60 $121.21 $123.77 $126.28 $128.80 $131.38CDC office supplies $32.02 $32.72 $33.41 $34.09 $34.77 $35.47CDC Consumable supplies(paper products, crib sheets,custodial supplies, etc.) $112.67 $115.15 $117.58 $119.96 $122.36 $124.81CDC Curriculum Supplies(Required Materials toimplement The CreativeCurriculum System) N/A $8.08 $8.25 $8.42 $8.59 $8.76CDC Food Costs $604.00 $617.29 $630.31 $643.11 $655.97 $669.09CDC Kitchen Supplies (e.g.child size dishes andserving utensils, food $24.45 $25.00 $25.53 $26.05 $26.57 $27.10 44
  • 51. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS TABLE 4-1: COST PER CHILD FOR NON-LABOR EXPENSES FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 FY2011 FY2012 FY2013 ITEM Cost/ Cost/ Cost/ Cost/ Cost/ Cost/ Child/Year Child/Year Child/Year Child/Year Child/Year Child/Yearpreparation materials, etc.)CDC Training Supplies(e.g. training aids, outsidepresenters, etc.) $24.45 $25.00 $25.53 $26.05 $26.57 $27.10 CDH NON-LABOR EXPENSESCDH supplies, toys, andequipment – lending library $41.51 $42.42 $43.43 $44.20 $45.08 $45.98CDH office supplies $32.02 $32.72 $33.42 $34.09 $34.78 $35.47CDH Training Supplies(e.g. training aids, outsidepresenters, etc.) $5.87 $6.00 $6.13 $6.25 $6.38 $6.51 SAC NON-LABOR EXPENSESSAC program supplies (e.g.toys, books, puzzles, paper,paint) $67.51 $69.03 $70.49 $71.92 $73.36 $74.83SAC Minor Equipment(<1K) (replacement) (e.g.tables, chairs, computers) $112.67 $115.15 $117.58 $119.96 $122.36 $124.81SAC office supplies $32.02 $32.72 $33.42 $34.09 $34.78 $35.47SAC Consumable supplies(paper products, disposablefood service items,custodial supplies, etc.) $110.19 $112.67 $114.78 $117.11 $119.45 $121.84SAC Field Trip Costs(Entrance and program feesfor field trips to supportrequired program goals) $44.04 $45.03 $45.98 $46.91 $47.85 $48.81SAC Food Costs $272.00 $277.98 $283.85 $289.61 $295.40 $301.31Transportation Costs (e.g.depreciation costs forowned vehicles, fuel, orcontracts) $235.20 $240.00 $244.80 $249.69 $254.68 $259.77SAC Training Supplies(e.g. training aids, outsidepresenters, etc.) $24.45 $25.00 $25.53 $26.05 $26.57 $27.10 45
  • 52. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS46
  • 53. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS V. Subsidies & IncentivesAcross the CYP, and with most organizations, salaries are the largest budget item as well as thekey to program quality. Recruiting and retaining qualified staff allows programs to increasequality over time through training and on-site support, providing consistency and continuity forchildren and families, reducing the stress on CYP Professionals which accompanies highturnover, and reducing time spent by management on hiring and orienting new staff.In this chapter we will provide information on “core” CDH subsidies and incentives that arerequired to be offered by all CDH programs, as well as incentives that can be offered across CYPprograms to improve recruitment and retention. A subsidy is tied directly to care provided tofamilies within CDH where incentives are designed to attract and retain CYP Professionals in allprograms.CORE CDH SUBSIDY OVERVIEW ANDAUTHORIZATIONCDH is a cost effective and flexible way to meet changing demographics and increase programcapacity. CDH also helps military families by providing an employment opportunity to interestedindividuals. Appropriated Funds (APF) are authorized to provide cash payments to CDHproviders to help make center-based and home-based child care equitable for all eligible parents.This subsidy should be viewed as a relief for child care costs which would be otherwisetransferred to the eligible family members. Subsidies also allow the CDH provider to receive thefair market value of the services being provided. Keep in mind, a space to parents is onlyconsidered a viable space if it is affordable, available and quality.CORE CDH CASH SUBSIDIES AND INCENTIVESDirect care cash subsidies provide additional revenue for CDH providers to care for childrenfrom 4 weeks to 12 years of age and can also be targeted to meet specific requirements such asextended hours care, special needs, and infant/toddler care. Direct care cash subsidies areauthorized for care provided to children of all eligible patrons. The core subsidies and incentivesoutlined in Table 5-1 must be offered, but more may be added locally by region and/or byinstallation if needed. Local policies should be established on how payments are made to theproviders. 47
  • 54. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSUsing recruitment and retention incentives can assist in reducing the high CDH providerturnover rate by making it financially viable to stay in the profession. In turn, a reduced turnoverrate can also increase the perception of users that CDH is a reliable and high quality service. TABLE 5-1: CORE CDH SUBSIDIES AND INCENTIVES Subsidizes weekly parent fees for children of all eligible patrons. Programs are required to provide this subsidy if there is a waiting list for a specific age group. Parents pay the same fees parents in center based programs pay.Full-time Care Command sets the ceiling based on market rates and local demand andSubsidy command reimburses the provider the difference between the parent fee and the ceiling. This information shall be updated annually when the new fees are established. Subsidizes those providers who offer infant/pretoddler care to offset lower enrollment due to ratio requirements. A provider who offers this type of careDesignated will have fewer children than the 6 allowed. Infant/pretoddler care typicallyInfant/Pretoddler costs $80-$100/month more than other care. An appropriate subsidy basedHome Subsidy on local market rate for this age group and local demand requirements shall be used to determine the amount of subsidy. Providing 24/7 care is essential for those military personnel who work other than regular hours, work shifts, stand watch or are called for other special duties. In order for sailors and others to effectively perform their duties outside of “regular working hours” they must have care for their children. This is especially true for single parents and for dual military families. This type of care can be subsidized similarly to full-time care. Parents whose regular work schedule meets the definition of shift care below should receive the same number of childcare hours per week as those using care during traditional hours.Designated 24/7, After hour child care is care provided between the hours of 1800-0600Extended Hours, Monday - Thursday, 1800 Friday - 0600 Monday and all Federal Holidays.Shift Care Shift care is provided for military personnel whose regular duty includesSubsidy weekends, evenings, and overnight shifts. To be designated as a shift worker for the purpose of this subsidy, the parents schedule must require them to work 50% of their schedule during the times designated as after hours. For example, the parent is required to work 2 day shifts (0700-1530), 2 mid shifts (2300-0700), 2 eve shifts (1500-2300) and has three days off. If there is any question regarding if the parents schedule qualifies them as a shift worker, the CDH Director will make the final determination. Watch standers care is provided for military personnel whose work schedule requires after hour child care on an occasional basis. For example, the parent is required to work an overnight shift once a month. Subsidizes CDH providers who accept children with special needs. Special needs children will be determined as defined by the Americans withSpecial Needs Disabilities Act and on a case by case basis. Medical documentation and aCare Subsidy review by the Command Special Needs Review Board (SNRB) must be presented to identify condition. In addition to the subsidy the provider might 48
  • 55. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS TABLE 5-1: CORE CDH SUBSIDIES AND INCENTIVES receive for providing full-time care, there would also be an additional subsidy amount to help the provider with the difference in her income if the SNRB limits the number of other children she can have in her program. The amount of this subsidy may vary per child based on the special needs of the child, the additional requirements placed on the CDH Provider, and the constraints on income by lowered ratios as determined by the SNRB.Annual To be paid annually to encourage providers to stay in the field and toRetention continue providing CDH services. A minimum of $250.00 paid to the CDHIncentive Provider each year after all re-certification requirements are met. To be paid at the time of achieving accreditation to encourage retention inNAFCC the field and continuation of quality. A minimum of $500.00 paid to theAccreditation CDH Provider upon achieving NAFCC accreditation and each yearIncentive accreditation and certification is maintained. To be paid one time upon the provider’s reinstatement at a new installation. In order to receive this incentive the provider must go through the entireRelocation process and get recertified. A minimum of $250.00 paid to the CDHIncentive Provider upon transferring to a new command and meeting all certification requirements at the new location. This amount is paid by the gaining command.Additional CDH Incentive IdeasRecruiting and retaining qualified CDH Providers has become increasingly challenging for allmilitary services. Table 5-2 provides examples of additional monetary and non-monetaryincentives available to assist in attracting and showing on-going support for CDH Providers. TABLE 5-2: SUGGESTED CDH INCENTIVES Non-Monetary Examples Child safety locks, outlet covers, art supplies, and Start Up Kits curriculum ideas can be provided to defer the cost to the applicant and encourages them to join. House flag, t-shirt, keychain, magnet, pen, CDH plaque to each applicant who successfully completes certification Marketing items requirements. Local CDH Directors will provide a portfolio with CDH letterhead, note-cards, envelopes and calling cards to CDH providers. Providing child care to CDH providers if training occurs during normal work hours. Providers who do not Training support successfully complete the initial certification training must repay the cost of child care. 49
  • 56. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS TABLE 5-2: SUGGESTED CDH INCENTIVES Monetary Examples Each certified provider who recruits another provider who stays certified for a minimum of 90 days can receive a cash Recruitment Bonus bonus. There is no limit to the number of applicants a certified provider can recruit, other than caseload numbers driven by the local staffing levels and/or commander. This includes Child Development Associate (CDA) credentialing, Military Home Accreditation (MHA), CDH training grants membership in professional associations, and attendance at professional workshops and training beyond the required Navy CDH Standardized Training Plan. Provider receives a cash bonus for completing CDH modules CDH training incentive within the time frame specified.CYP PROGRAM INCENTIVES AND RECOGNITIONS "Paying people extra money to do an impossible job doesn’t work and you need to make the jobs doable such that at the end of the day, people feel glad that they’re there.”- Richard MurnaneEmployee incentives, rewards, and recognition programs not only show your staff that you valuetheir contributions, but also inspire performance and positively reinforce desired behaviors.Incentives motivate and drive action and change. Although, you have to keep in mind thatproviding incentives alone is not enough. Few individuals will be swayed by financial incentivesif they suspect that the incentives are purely compensatory measures to make up for bad workingconditions, lack of resources, and poor leadership, rather than part of a larger plan to make theirjobs more personally and professionally rewarding.Incentives can be monetary or non-monetary, and both forms can be very effective. Table 5-3provides examples of both. Note: NAF financial regulations must be followed when offeringmonetary incentives. 50
  • 57. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS TABLE 5-3: CYP PROFESSIONAL INCENTIVES Non-Monetary Examples Flowers, chocolates, small gift cards, special treatsTokens of appreciation in the break room, thank you notes left in staff mailboxes, etc. A board that highlights staff achievements and accomplishments for all to see. Staff should be“Kudos” board encouraged to celebrate the achievements of fellow professionals by adding “kudos” to the board.CYP Professionals Appreciation A dinner held in conjunction with required trainingDinner in honor of all the hard working CYP professionals. Plaques, certificates, medals, awards, letters ofRecognition items appreciation. This may include opportunities to write articles for installation and local papers, distribution ofProfessional Development professional books and DVDs, opportunities toOpportunities attend conferences and/or other than required training. Monetary Examples A bonus given to all staff of a program when itAccreditation bonus becomes accredited acknowledging everyone’s efforts and contribution to this achievement. An annual bonus/stipend to those individuals who take on responsibilities to help maintainAdditional stipend while accredited accreditation requirements such as maintaining the classroom portfolios. Linked to specific identified professionalScholarships to attend conferences development goals.Gift certificates for supplies Linked to identified goals for program improvement. For personal use as a recognition of achievement ofGift cards individual professional goals and/or program goals. Each staff member who recruits additional programRecruitment Bonus staff who stays for a minimum of 90 days can receive a cash bonus. Full or partial reimbursement for successfulFull or part reimbursement for completion of college courses toward achieving anprofessional development in terms of AA or BA in Early Education or related field incontinuing formal education order to grow as a professional and meet future accreditation requirements. Staff receive a cash bonus for completing annualCYP training incentive certifications. 51
  • 58. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSRecognition and AppreciationRecognizing and appreciating staff is an easy and effective way to increase morale and improverecruitment and retention. The best recognition award is something that they will keep andremind them of the time that they were rewarded. This way, every time they see the award, theywill remember and reflect on their accomplishments. Tokens of appreciation, such as balloons,chocolates, flowers, and banners are an inexpensive way to show staff how much they are valuedand appreciated. Arranging for leadership figures on the base to provide recognition by eithersetting up a special meeting or presenting awards or plaques for specific accomplishments andmilestones met can be a very effective incentive. Recognizing staff accomplishments in parentnewsletters and command publications not only rewards staff but is a great marketing tool for theentire CYP. The accomplishments of one are the accomplishments of all!Encouraging Staff DevelopmentEmployees who feel better prepared to do their jobs will be more satisfied and confident in theirwork. Encouraging staff development is a powerful tool in the recruitment and retention of staff.There are many ways to encourage staff development across the CYP, some simple and somemore elaborate. As mentioned in tables in this chapter, distributing professional developmentbooks, full or partial reimbursement for professional development workshops and/or highereducation courses, and allowing staff time off to participate in training or classes are some waysto promote staff development.CYP directors should encourage CYP employees to continue their education in order to meet therequirements of NAA and NAEYC. Where funding is available, the CYP will provide fundingfor CYP employees to further their education by attending classes relating to their positions.Additionally, the CYP will assist CYP employees in completing their CDA or MSA, as well ascollege level courses appropriate to the employee’s position. Grants from CNIC are available toassist in this area. 52
  • 59. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS VI. NAF RevenuesIn order to have high quality programs, we must be able to pay for them. As with any budget, wemust look at both what is coming in and how those resources are being spent. In the other chapters,we focus on efficient ways to use our revenues/resources. Taking the CYP as one unit, this chapterlooks at ways to maximize Non-appropriated Funds (NAF) and increase standardization throughoutNavy CYP. The goal is to minimize financial hardship to parents but recognize that adequaterevenues are necessary to meet high standards and provide sufficient availability and capacity forfamilies.The easiest way to maximize NAF revenues is to maximize enrollment by minimizing the time achild space is vacant and by maximizing the use of drop in care in all CYPs.The most common sources of income are parent fees, reimbursement from participation in theUSDA food program, and grants. From a CYP approach we want to be sure parent fees and thepolicies and procedures related to the collection of those fees are aligned across all programs.CNIC FEE POLICYCNIC has established a Navy-wide uniform fee structure to standardize all parent fees. Thestandardized fee structure applies to all CDC, SAC and subsidized CDH programs. DoD updates themandated fee scale based on inflation rates annually and CNIC issues guidance updating theuniform fee structure for all Navy installations based on this update. The annual CNIC guidanceincludes additional information on fees for part-day programs, hourly fees, late pick up fees andcalculation of Total Family Income (TFI). Each installation is required to issue a singular CYP feepolicy letter annually upon receipt of the CNIC fee policy letter.DoD bases fees on TFI instead of on the age of the child, which is common in the private sector.Junior enlisted usually have infants and toddlers who are more costly to care for. The fee structuresubsidizes the care for these lower paid personnel when they need it most. As their children getolder and their income increases, the government subsidy is reduced and they pay for a greater shareof the costs. However, care for all income groups is subsidized; just less for higher incomecategories. All parents are required to sign a Navy CYP Parent Fee Agreement, following eachannual TFI and fee review. The parent fee agreement shall list the parent’s fees for child care, feepolicies, and an annual reminder to parents of the requirement to provide a 2-week notice to cancelchild care services. Parents participating in a CDH program are only required to sign a parent feeagreement if they are participating in the CDH subsidy program. 53
  • 60. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSFor annual budgeting purposes revenue from parent fees must be calculated for each CYPcomponent and will be based on historical data as well as an escalation factor set by CNIC based onplanned changes to the standardized Navy-wide fee rates.INCOME FROM USDA REIMBURSEMENTNot-for-profit programs, such as the military, are able to participate in the USDA CACFP, whichsets standards for meals and snacks and provides tiered reimbursement for food costs depending onthe income of the families in the programs.USDA provides reimbursements to programs for food related costs to programs that contract withthem. Chapter 4 provides guidance on cost effective food service. Separate USDA contracts arerequired for CDC/SAC and CDH. The CDH program shall provide information to CDH providersabout the USDA CACFP reimbursement program and encourage CDH providers to participate.When developing the contract you must account for all equipment and supplies related to theoperation of the USDA program. Items that are reimbursable include:• Training costs and supplies.• Travel.• Salaries for clerical support and/or food program monitors (NAF only).• Marketing costs and supplies.• Office equipment.• Forms used in the USDA food program and pricing costs.USDA Reimbursement RatesIt is possible to determine the range of cost or the percentage of a total budget that should beplanned for food and related costs. It is also possible to budget for the expected USDAreimbursement based on the CACFP reimbursement rates. The rates are updated each year in July toreflect changes in food cost and can be found at:http://www.fns.usda.gov/cnd/care/ProgramBasics/Rates/ReimbursementRates_Current.htmFor July 2007-June 2008, the reimbursements rates are:• For Centers: o Breakfast: $1.35-$2.15 per child 54
  • 61. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS o Lunch and Supper: $2.47-$4.01 per child o Supplement: $0.68-$1.10 per child• For Homes: o Breakfast: $0.41-$1.76 per child o Lunch and Supper: $1.24-$3.34 per child o Supplement: $0.17-$0.99 per childThe range indicates a difference in reimbursement rate based on geographic location (rates inHawaii and Alaska are higher than in the contiguous states). Rates are also affected by the income-level of the area in which they are located. Tier I homes are located in low-income areas, while TierII homes are not.Another Federal indicator of reimbursement rates that is useful for SAC programs is the NationalSchool Lunch reimbursement rate. The after school reimbursement rate for 2007-2008 is $0.68-$1.10. Rates are updated each July and can be found at:http://www.fns.usda.gov/cnd/governance/notices/naps/NAPs.htm.Maximizing USDA ReimbursementsThere are a number of ways that programs can work together to maximize their reimbursementsacross the CYP. Many CYP programs are serving USDA meals and snacks but are not claiming allof the reimbursements they qualify for. This is specifically an issue with SAC programs who upuntil now have not been required to claim or provide meals. Some programs mark all of theirchildren as “paid” rather than actually completing income documents on children. Programs are tocollect completed income documents as part of the enrollment process and annually thereafter. Arequest for reimbursement on all meals provided to the children is then submitted to CACFP.Another common issue arises in CDC programs. CDC programs must be sure to claim their infantsas long as the parents are not supplying all of the food.Additional reimbursement can be gathered through for some of the costs of administering the CDHreimbursement program. CDH Programs can receive as much as $97-$158 dollars per home permonth to cover these costs. For a CDH with 20 homes, this would mean $23,280-$37,920 a year inreimbursements. The more CDH homes a program has, the more reimbursement they can receive.This reimbursement is specifically to cover administrative costs of being a USDA sponsor.The key to maximizing reimbursements is also ensuring that USDA training is kept up to date andshared across the CYP and ensuring that all USDA reports are processed in a timely manner and are 55
  • 62. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSchecked for accuracy. All USDA expenses must be documented or they will not be reimbursed. Becareful when completing the USDA food program production worksheets to make sure menus meetUSDA requirements. This is the area where many discrepancies are found during USDA foodprogram reviews causing the programs to be penalized by having to repay funds from the USDAfood income. Be sure to process USDA reports in a timely manner. Check and double check foraccuracy. During the USDA food program reviews, take the discrepancies very seriously. Oftenprograms are penalized on future earnings so it does not seem like such a hit financially. Manyprograms lose money in the current year because of a reduction in earnings caused by discrepanciesfound in previous years.ADDITIONAL REVENUE OPTIONSTo maximize income and cost efficiencies, MWR and CYP managers are encouraged to explore andidentify other funding sources and opportunities, as well as to utilize existing community resourcesof non-profit organizations that provide services to children and youth. In-kind resources, such asvolunteer staff, technical support, and donated space and equipment, are significant resources.Determining how to attract and make effective use of these resources as well as making the best useof funding already being expended is critical. This may mean applying for new grants or working inpartnership with other agencies to tap into existing funding.Networking and establishing partnerships with the military and civilian communities also contributeto creative solutions and cost savings. Examples may include:• Exploring grants available for funding.• Finding local sponsorships (e.g., computer room sponsored by Office Depot).• Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) donations.• Recycling dollars.• Commissary donations.• Special Interest Group donations.Partnerships and collaborative efforts with local schools and community-based youth servingorganizations may be implemented to enhance and expand opportunities for children and youth.Examples of such organizations are the BGCA, Cooperative Extension, 4-H, Armed ServicesYMCA, Drug Education for Youth (DEFY), Drug and Alcohol Resistance Education (DARE), locallaw enforcement, and healthcare clinics. Other examples may include: 56
  • 63. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS• Partnerships with community colleges and universities for training resources, intern programs, and job fairs.• Partnerships with Welfare-to-Work programs.• Partnerships with military community and commercial vendors for bulk purchasing rebates and other in-kind services such as medical supplies, arts and crafts materials, and training.• Partnerships with Head Start, local schools etc. to expand availability of care, maximize facility utilization, share training space/resources.For maximum efficiency resources must be integrated in new, creative, and strategic ways.Effective financing strategies should include:• Making better use of existing resources. o Operating more efficiently by cutting costs. o Maximizing volunteer contributions and enhancing access to people, services, and in-kind support. o Improving internal management systems by collecting and using data to guide decision- making.• Maximizing revenue that is in the system but has not been tapped. o Responding to grant announcements. o Leveraging public funds by providing resources to meet matching or challenge grants.• Building partnerships between public- and private-sector organizations. o Joining forces with other local providers that share common interests or that provide complementary services for youth.• Developing new dedicated revenue sources through commercial sponsorship.GRANTSNavy CYP are authorized to apply for and receive BGCA grants as an incidental membershipbenefit available to BGCA organizations. Grants are sums of money awarded to finance a particularactivity or facility. Grants are funds given to tax-exempt nonprofit organizations or localgovernments by foundations, corporations, governments, small business and individuals. Theprocess involves an applicant submitting a proposal to a potential funder, either on the applicantsown initiative or in response to a Request for Proposals (RFP) from the funder. 57
  • 64. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSA system should be developed to identify and track grant or proposal announcements. It is alsoimportant to set aside time and other resources to enable staff or other identified individuals torespond to these announcements. One way to get parents and youth involved in the grant writingprocess is to form a sub-committee or work group made up of parents and youth of the CYPprogram. Together, they can pool their resources and tackle the grant writing process. This is also agreat thing that can be done at the regional level.Another option is to designate a regional contact that can help installations locate grantopportunities available to military youth programs. Once these opportunities have been identified,each installation can be responsible for writing and submitting their own grants or the region cansubmit for all participating installations. The BGCA website is a great place to find grants(www.bgca.org).Grant Writing TipsBefore developing a grant proposal, it is important to understand the goals of the particular agencyor organization, and of the grant program itself. Understanding the goals of a grant program can beaccomplished through discussions with the person listed as an information contact in each grantdescription. In allocating funds, grantmakers base their decisions on the applicants ability to fit itsproposed activities within the grantmakers interest areas.• Make sure that the first page acts as a stand-alone summary of the entire proposal. Present your whole case: what you want to do, why its important, why you will succeed, how much it will cost, and so on.• Does the proposal address a well-formulated problem?• Is it an important problem? Will the solution have useful effects on the program?• Is special funding necessary to solve the problem or to solve it quickly enough?• The proposal must explain the idea in sufficient detail to convince the reader that the idea has some substance, and should explain why there is reason to believe that it is indeed a good idea.• Does the proposal explain clearly what will be done? Does it explain what results are expected and how they will be evaluated? How would it be possible to judge whether the work was successful? 58
  • 65. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS Appendix A: CDC AdditionalEnrollment Cost Analysis Worksheet 59
  • 66. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSINSTRUCTIONS FOR USING THE CDC ADDITIONALENROLLMENT COST ANALYSIS WORKSHEETOverview and PurposeFull and consistent utilization of space is a primary goal of Navy Child and Youth Programs (CYP)and key to meeting the needs of Navy families. To maximize capacity, Child Development Center(CDC) Directors should review classroom utilization and analyze wait list demand information. NoCDC should have empty classrooms and a wait list.The CDC Additional Enrollment Cost Analysis Worksheet was developed to assist Directors indetermining when to open additional classrooms and how to calculate the costs associated with theincreased enrollment. The worksheet will calculate the additional expenses and show the Non-Appropriated Fund (NAF) profit or loss associated with the projected increased enrollment. Theworksheet is available on the CYP web site.Detailed Instruction All light yellow colored cells (# of Hours and Age Group) contain drop- down lists that can be viewed by clicking on that cell. All bright yellow cells require data entry.Additional Enrollment ProjectedWithin the Additional Enrollment Projected section the "Classroom" and "Projected Enrollment"columns require data entry whereas the "# of Hours" and "Age Group" columns contain drop-downmenus. The "Teacher/Child Ratio, Group Size and Authorized FTE" (full-time equivalent) fieldscalculate automatically. 60
  • 67. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSUnder the "Classroom" column, enter the name or number that will be used toidentify the new room being added. Under the "# of Hours" column, select anumber from the drop-down list (i.e., numbers 8 through 12 in half hourincrements) that represents the average number of hours children will bepresent in the classroom. Under the "Age Group" column, select the appropriate age category from the following list: infant, pretoddler, toddler, preschool and SAC. Under the "Projected Enrollment" column, enter the projected number of children to be enrolled in the new classroom. This number will generally not exceed the group size listed. Additional information regarding group sizes and ratios is available in OPNAV 1700.9.Additional Staff Cost SummaryWithin the Additional Staff Cost Summary section, data entry is required for the "Annual BaseSalary" column. The remaining fields calculate automatically.The first column lists the Child and Youth Program Assistant as required staff. In the secondcolumn the "Projected Number of Additional FTE" calculates the projected FTE required to coverclassroom hours based on the projected increased enrollment. The second column also calculatesthe additional FTE required to cover training, leave, and classroom planning. Enter the annual basesalary excluding benefits in the third column. Total salary and benefits will automatically calculatein the remaining columns.Cost SummaryWithin the Cost Summary section the "Projected Expense" and "Total Projected Parent Fee" cellsrequire data entry. The remaining fields calculate automatically. The first column lists the expensesassociated with additional enrollment in the CDC program. The second column titled "NavyStandard" lists the authorized cost per child. The third column titled "Authorized Expense"calculates the total authorized expense based on the projected increased enrollment. Enter the actualprojected expense in the fourth column. Use the yellow field next to the row titled "Start UpSupplies" to describe the necessary start up supplies. Use the yellow field next to the "Other" rows 61
  • 68. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSto explain additional required expenses. Enter the total projected parent fees in the "Total ProjectedParent Fees" row. The projected NAF profit or loss will be shown on the last row.Explanations: Authorized Expense vs. Projected ExpenseExplain any variance between authorized expenses and projected expenses in this text box.This form should be submitted to CNIC (N912) if additional funding is needed to meet thisrequirement. 62
  • 69. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSCDC ADDITIONAL ENROLLMENT COST ANALYSISWORKSHEET CDC ADDITIONAL ENROLLMENT COST ANALYSISCYP NameDateADDITIONAL ENROLLMENT PROJECTED Projected Classroom # of Hours Age Group Teacher/Child Ratio Group Size Authorized FTE Enrollment 0 0 0.00 0 0 0.00 0 0 0.00 0 0 0.00TOTALS 0 0.00ADDITIONAL STAFF COST SUMMARY Projected Number Annual Base Salary Direct Staff FTE Required of Additional FTE (Excluding Benefits) Total Salary & Total Salary Total BenefitsProgram Assistant - Classroom Hours 0.00 BenefitsAddl FTE - Training/Annual & Sick Leave 0.00TOTALS 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00COST SUMMARY Authorized Projected Navy Standard Expense ExpenseCDC Personnel Costs 0.00CDC Classroom Supplies 109.09 0.00CDC Office Supplies 32.72 0.00CDC Consumables 115.15 0.00Curriculum Supplies 8.08 0.00CDC Minor Equipment (<1K) 115.15 0.00Food Costs 617.29 0.00Less USDA Reimbursement (308.65) 0.00Kitchen Supplies 25.00 0.00Training Supplies 25.00 0.00Start Up SuppliesOtherOtherTotal Authorized and Projected Expenses 0.00 0.00Total Projected Parent FeesProjected NAF Profit/(Loss) Resulting from Additional Enrollment 0.00Explanations : Authorized Expense vs. Projected Expense 63
  • 70. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS64
  • 71. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS Appendix B: SAC AdditionalEnrollment Cost Analysis Worksheet 65
  • 72. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSINSTRUCTIONS FOR USING THE SAC ADDITIONALENROLLMENT COST ANALYSIS WORKSHEETOverview and PurposeFull and consistent utilization of space is a primary goal of Navy Child and Youth Programs (CYP)and key to meeting the needs of Navy families. To maximize capacity, Youth Directors shouldreview capacity and analyze wait list demand information. No SAC program should have excesscapacity and a wait list.The SAC Additional Enrollment Cost Analysis Worksheet was developed to assist Directors indetermining the costs associated with increasing enrollment in the SAC program. The worksheetwill calculate the additional expenses and show the Non-Appropriated Fund (NAF) profit or lossassociated with the projected increased enrollment. The worksheet is available on the CYP web site.Detailed InstructionAll light yellow colored cells (SAC Program and # of Daily Hours)contain drop-down lists that can be viewed by clicking on that cell. Allbright yellow cells require data entry.Additional Enrollment ProjectedWithin the Additional Enrollment Projected section, the "# of Session Weeks" and "Projected AddlEnrollment" columns require data entry whereas the "SAC Program" and "# of Daily Hours"columns contain drop-down lists. The remaining fields calculate automatically. 66
  • 73. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSUnder the "SAC Program" column, select the appropriate category from thefollowing list: before school, after school, kindergarten, and camps/holidays.Under the "# of Session Weeks" column enter the number of weeks of the yearthat the chosen program is in session. Under the "# of Daily Hours" column, select a number from the drop-down list (i.e., numbers 2 through 12 in one hour increments) that represents the average number of hours a day the program is in session. Under the "Projected Addl Enrollment" column, enter the projected additional number of children to be enrolled.Additional Staff Cost SummaryWithin the Additional Staff Cost Summary section, data entry is required for the "Annual BaseSalary" column. The remaining fields calculate automatically.The first column lists the Child and Youth Program Assistant as required staff. In the secondcolumn the "Projected Number of Additional FTE" calculates the projected FTE required to coverclassroom hours based on the projected increased enrollment. The second column also calculatesthe additional FTE required to cover training and leave. Enter the annual base salary excludingbenefits in the third column. Total salary and benefits will automatically calculate in the remainingcolumns.Cost SummaryWithin the Cost Summary section the "Total Projected Expense" and "Total Projected Parent Fee"cells require data entry. The remaining fields calculate automatically. The first column lists theexpenses associated with additional enrollment in the SAC program. The second column titled"Navy Standard" lists the authorized cost per child. The third column titled "Authorized Expense"calculates the total authorized expense based on the projected increased enrollment. Enter the actualprojected expense in the fourth column. Use the yellow field next to the row titled "Start Up 67
  • 74. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSSupplies" to describe the necessary start up supplies. Use the yellow field next to the "Other" rowsto explain additional required expenses. Enter the total projected parent fees in the "Total ProjectedParent Fees" row. The projected NAF profit or loss will be shown on the last row.Explanations: Authorized Expense vs. Projected ExpenseExplain any variance between authorized expenses and projected expenses in this text box.This form should be submitted to CNIC (N912) if additional funding is needed to meet thisrequirement. 68
  • 75. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSSAC ADDITIONAL ENROLLMENT COST ANALYSISWORKSHEET SAC ADDITIONAL ENROLLMENT COST ANALYSISCYP NameDateADDITIONAL ENROLLMENT PROJECTED # of Session Annual Teacher/Child Projected Addl Prorated Required SAC Program # of Daily Hours Weeks Prorated % Ratio Enrollment Enrollment Number of Staff 0.00% 15 0 0.00 0.00% 15 0 0.00 0.00% 15 0 0.00 0.00% 15 0 0.00TOTALS 0 0 0.00ADDITIONAL STAFF COST SUMMARY Projected Number Annual Base Salary Direct Staff FTE Required of Additional FTE (Excl. Benefits) Total Salary & Total Salary Total BenefitsProgram Assistant - Calssroom Hours 0.00 BenefitsAddl FTE - Training/Annual & Sick Leave 0.00TOTALS 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00COST SUMMARY Authorized Total Projected Navy Standard Expense ExpensesSAC Personnel Costs 0.00SAC Program Supplies 69.03 0.00SAC Office Supplies 32.72 0.00SAC Consumables 112.67 0.00SAC Minor Equipment (<1K) 115.15 0.00Field Trip 45.03 0.00Transportation 240.00 0.00Food Costs 277.98 0.00Less USDA Reimbursement (138.99) 0.00Training Supplies 25.00 0.00Start Up SuppliesOtherOtherTotal Authorized and Projected Expenses 0.00 0.00Total Projected Parent FeesProjected NAF Profit/(Loss) Resulting from Additional Enrollment 0.00Explanations : Authorized Expense vs. Projected Expense 69
  • 76. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS70
  • 77. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSAppendix C: CYP Weekly Staff Schedule Worksheet 71
  • 78. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSINSTRUCTIONS FOR USING THE CYP WEEKLY STAFFSCHEDULE WORKSHEETOverall SummaryThe weekly staff schedule worksheet should be used both for scheduling FTEs and tracking actualhours worked. Direct staff actual hours worked is required to be tracked in order to ensure directstaff is efficiently used, however optional methods can be used to track actual hours. This staffschedule worksheet can be used to create a singular staffing schedule across the CYP. Employeesshould be shared across the CYP as necessary to maximize resources and ensure program hours arecovered. The worksheet is available on the CYP web site.Detailed InstructionsScheduling FTEsThe weekly staff schedule worksheet contains 21 pages. The first page contains formulas thatsummarize the data contained in the subsequent 20 pages. Pages 2 through 21 are identical.Staffing information for up to 9 employees can be listed on each page. Notethat the schedule includes columns for Friday through Thursday as well as anoptional sixth (weekend) day. The sixth day includes a drop-down list that canbe changed to Saturday or Sunday by clicking on that cell.There are 4 rows for each employee, allowing for up to 3 different hour types to be entered each day(e.g., direct care by program type, leave, training, planning, other, LWOP). If all 3 rows are notrequired in a day, they should be left blank. The 4th row is for a total. The purple cells can be used to title/classify a program, age group or classroom and can also show the name of the floater assigned to that group. These can also be left blank.All light yellow colored cells (e.g., employee type, hour type, staffing schedule for theweek of) contain drop-down lists that can be viewed by clicking on that cell. The"employee type" menu includes the following terms, one of which must be selected foreach employee listed: GS (Government Service), full-time (Non-Appropriated FundFT), part-time (Non-Appropriated Fund PT), and flex (Non-Appropriated Fund FL). 72
  • 79. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS The "hour type" menu includes the following terms: CDC, SAC, YP, leave, training, planning, other, LWOP. The "staffing schedule for the week of" menu at the top of Page 1 of the worksheet contains one additional item: Actual Staff Hours for the Week of (see instructions for Tracking Actual Hours).All bright yellow cells require data entry. Onpage 1, enter text in the "CYP Name" field (cellC1) and the first day of the week in the "StaffingSchedule for the Week of" field (cell R1). Forexample, if the first day of the week is 03 March 2008, enter this day into that field in the followingformat: DD-Month-YYYY. Leave the "Date" field blank; it will be used when tracking actualhours. On page 2, enter Fridays date in cell E24. All remaining dates will calculate. Enter dates in this format: DD-Month-YYYY.For example, 03 March 2008.On pages 2-21, enter each employees start and stop times using militarytime format. Input the hour first, then tab and input the minutes for Startand Stop Time. Enter Break Hours as the total amount of time spent onbreak; input hour(s), tab, then minutes. The Total Hours will then becalculated as a decimal in the following format:• 15 minutes = .25• 30 minutes = .50• 45 minutes = .75• one hour = 1.When entering vacation time, enter a start and stop time. 73
  • 80. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSTracking Actual HoursAt the end of the staffing period, update the worksheet to include actual hours worked. To do this,follow these steps:1. Create a copy of the worksheet by saving it with a different name. For example, "Actuals-Week- 03March2008."2. From the pull down list, change cell J1 to reflect "Actual Staff Hours for the Week of."3. Enter the date into the "Date" field in this format: DD-Month-YYYY. This is an optional field that can be used to track when the actual hours "report" was generated.4. Change the data in pages 2 through 21 from scheduled data to actual data. This includes entering sick hours, which should be entered as "leave" or "LWOP" with a start and stop time.After completing these steps, page 1 will automatically summarize the actual data entered. 74
  • 81. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSPrinting Completed Staff SchedulesThere are two ways to print only the pages of the Schedule that you have completed. Review thegray, watermark page numbers in the worksheet to determine how many pages have been used.If the gray numbers are not visible, click on "View" in the menu barand then "Page Break Preview".1. Click on "File" at the top and chose "Print". Select the option to print specific pages and enter the range that includes all of the pages you have used. For example, if data was entered through page 5, the page range 1-5 would be printed.OR2. Using the mouse, highlight the cells to be printed. Click on "File" at the top and chose "Print". Click on Selection to print the highlighted area. 75
  • 82. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSCYP WEEKLY STAFF SCHEDULE WORKSHEET 76
  • 83. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS 77
  • 84. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS78
  • 85. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSAppendix D: CDC Weekly Staff Schedule Worksheet 79
  • 86. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSINSTRUCTIONS FOR USING THE CDC WEEKLY STAFFSCHEDULE WORKSHEETOverall SummaryThe weekly staff schedule worksheet should be used both for scheduling FTEs and tracking actualhours worked. Direct staff actual hours worked is required to be tracked in order to ensure directstaff is efficiently used, however optional methods can be used to track actual hours. This staffschedule worksheet can be used to create a staffing schedule for the CDC remembering thatemployees should be shared across the CYP as necessary to maximize resources and ensureprogram hours are covered. The worksheet is available on the CYP web site.Detailed InstructionsScheduling FTEsThe weekly staff schedule worksheet contains 21 pages. The first page contains formulas thatsummarize the data contained in the subsequent 20 pages. Pages 2 through 21 are identical.Staffing information for up to 9 employees can be listed on each page. Notethat the schedule includes columns for Friday through Thursday as well as anoptional sixth (weekend) day. The sixth day includes a drop-down list that canbe changed to Saturday or Sunday by clicking on that cell.There are 4 rows for each employee, allowing for up to 3 different hour types to be entered each day(e.g., direct care by program type, leave, training, planning, other, LWOP.). If all 3 rows are notrequired in a day, they should be left blank. The 4th row is for a total. The purple cells can be used to title/classify a program, age group or classroom and can also show the name of the floater assigned to that group. These can also be left blank.All light yellow colored cells (e.g., employee type, hour type, staffing schedule for theweek of) contain drop-down lists that can be viewed by clicking on that cell. The"employee type" menu includes the following terms, one of which must be selected foreach employee listed: GS (Government Service), full-time (Non-Appropriated Fund FT),part-time (Non-Appropriated Fund PT), and flex (Non-Appropriated Fund FL). 80
  • 87. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS The "hour type" menu includes the following terms: CDC, leave, training, planning, other, LWOP. The "staffing schedule for the week of" menu at the top of Page 1 of the worksheet contains one additional item: Actual Staff Hours for the Week of (see instructions for Tracking Actual Hours).All bright yellow cells require data entry. On page1, enter text in the "CDC Name" field (cell C1) andthe first day of the week in the "Staffing Schedulefor the Week of" field (cell R1). For example, if thefirst day of the week is 03 March 2008, enter this day into that field in the following format: DD-Month-YYYY. Leave the "Date" field blank; it will be used when tracking actual hours. On page 2, enter Fridays date in cell E24. All remaining dates will calculate. Enter dates in this format: DD-Month-YYYY.For example, 03 March 2008.On pages 2-21, enter each employees start and stop times using militarytime format. Input the hour first, then tab and input the minutes for Startand Stop Time. Enter Break Hours as the total amount of time spent onbreak; input hour(s), tab, then minutes. The Total Hours will then becalculated as a decimal in the following format:• 15 minutes = .25• 30 minutes = .50• 45 minutes = .75• one hour = 1.When entering vacation time, enter a start and stop time. 81
  • 88. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSTracking Actual HoursAt the end of the staffing period, update the worksheet to include actual hours worked. To do this,follow these steps:1. Create a copy of the worksheet by saving it with a different name. For example, "Actuals-Week- 03March2008."2. From the pull down list, change cell J1 to reflect "Actual Staff Hours for the Week of."3. Enter the date into the "Date" field in this format: DD-Month-YYYY. This is an optional field that can be used to track when the actual hours "report" was generated.4. Change the data in pages 2 through 21 from scheduled data to actual data. This includes entering sick hours, which should be entered as "leave" or "LWOP" with a start and stop time.After completing these steps, page 1 will automatically summarize the actual data entered. 82
  • 89. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSPrinting Completed Staff SchedulesThere are two ways to print only the pages of the Schedule that you have completed. Review thegray, watermark page numbers in the worksheet to determine how many pages have been used.If the gray numbers are not visible, click on "View" in the menu barand then "Page Break Preview".1. Click on "File" at the top and chose "Print". Select the option to print specific pages and enter the range that includes all of the pages you have used. For example, if data was entered through page 5, the page range 1-5 would be printed.OR2. Using the mouse, highlight the cells to be printed. Click on "File" at the top and chose "Print". Click on Selection to print the highlighted area. 83
  • 90. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSCDC WEEKLY STAFF SCHEDULE WORKSHEET 84
  • 91. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS 85
  • 92. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS86
  • 93. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSAppendix E: SAC/YP Weekly Staff Schedule Worksheet 87
  • 94. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSINSTRUCTIONS FOR USING THE SAC/YP WEEKLYSTAFF SCHEDULE WORKSHEETOverall SummaryThe weekly staff schedule worksheet should be used both for scheduling FTEs and tracking actualhours worked. Direct staff actual hours worked is required to be tracked in order to ensure directstaff is efficiently used, however optional methods can be used to track actual hours. This staffschedule worksheet can be used to create a staffing schedule for the SAC and Youth Programsremembering that employees should be shared across the CYP as necessary to maximize resourcesand ensure program hours are covered. The worksheet is available on the CYP web site.Detailed InstructionsScheduling FTEsThe weekly staff schedule worksheet contains 21 pages. The first page contains formulas thatsummarize the data contained in the subsequent 20 pages. Pages 2 through 21 are identical.Staffing information for up to 9 employees can be listed on each page. Notethat the schedule includes columns for Friday through Thursday as well as anoptional sixth (weekend) day. The sixth day includes a drop-down list that canbe changed to Saturday or Sunday by clicking on that cell.There are 4 rows for each employee, allowing for up to 3 different hour types to be entered each day(e.g., direct care by program type, leave, training, planning, other, LWOP.). If all 3 rows are notrequired in a day, they should be left blank. The 4th row is for a total. The purple cells can be used to title/classify a program, age group or classroom and can also show the name of the floater assigned to that group. These can also be left blank. All light yellow colored cells (e.g., employee type, hour type, staffingschedule for the week of) contain drop-down lists that can be viewed by clicking onthat cell. The "employee type" menu includes the following terms, one of which mustbe selected for each employee listed: GS (Government Service), full-time (Non-Appropriated Fund FT), part-time (Non-Appropriated Fund PT), and flex (Non-Appropriated Fund FL). 88
  • 95. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS The "hour type" menu includes the following terms: SAC, YP, leave, training, planning, other, LWOP. The "staffing schedule for the week of" menu at the top of Page 1 of the worksheet contains one additional item: Actual Staff Hours for the Week of (see instructions for Tracking Actual Hours).All bright yellow cells require data entry. On page 1,enter text in the "SAC/YP Name" field (cell C1) andthe first day of the week in the "Staffing Schedule forthe Week of" field (cell R1). For example, if the firstday of the week is 03 March 2008, enter this day into that field in the following format: DD-Month-YYYY. Leave the "Date" field blank; it will be used when tracking actual hours. On page 2, enter Fridays date in cell E24. All remaining dates will calculate. Enter dates in this format: DD-Month-YYYY.For example, 03 March 2008.On pages 2-21, enter each employees start and stop times using militarytime format. Input the hour first, then tab and input the minutes for Startand Stop Time. Enter Break Hours as the total amount of time spent onbreak; input hour(s), tab, then minutes. The Total Hours will then becalculated as a decimal in the following format:• 15 minutes = .25• 30 minutes = .50• 45 minutes = .75• one hour = 1.When entering vacation time, enter a start and stop time. 89
  • 96. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSAt the end of the staffing period, update the worksheet to include actual hours worked. To do this,follow these steps:1. Create a copy of the worksheet by saving it with a different name. For example, "Actuals-Week- 03March2008."2. From the pull down list, change cell J1 to reflect "Actual Staff Hours for the Week of."3. Enter the date into the "Date" field in this format: DD-Month-YYYY. This is an optional field that can be used to track when the actual hours "report" was generated.4. Change the data in pages 2 through 21 from scheduled data to actual data. This includes entering sick hours, which should be entered as "leave" or "LWOP" with a start and stop time.After completing these steps, page 1 will automatically summarize the actual data entered. 90
  • 97. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSPrinting Completed Staff SchedulesThere are two ways to print only the pages of the Schedule that you have completed. Review thegray, watermark page numbers in the worksheet to determine how many pages have been used.If the gray numbers are not visible, click on "View" in the menu barand then "Page Break Preview".1. Click on "File" at the top and chose "Print". Select the option to print specific pages and enter the range that includes all of the pages you have used. For example, if data was entered through page 5, the page range 1-5 would be printed.OR2. Using the mouse, highlight the cells to be printed. Click on "File" at the top and chose "Print". Click on Selection to print the highlighted area. 91
  • 98. MANAGEMENT STANDARDSSAC/YP WEEKLY STAFF SCHEDULE WORKSHEET 92
  • 99. MANAGEMENT STANDARDS 93