Cyp guidebook for hourly care
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CYP Guidebook for Hourly Care

CYP Guidebook for Hourly Care

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    Cyp guidebook for hourly care Cyp guidebook for hourly care Document Transcript

    • CYP Guidebook for Hourly Care Table of ContentsINTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................................................. 1 1. DEFINING HOURLY CARE ............................................................................................................................ 1 2. NEED FOR HOURLY CARE ............................................................................................................................ 2 3. STRUCTURE OF THE GUIDEBOOK.................................................................................................................. 3HOURLY CARE GUIDANCE .............................................................................................................................. 4 1. WHO CAN USE HOURLY CARE .................................................................................................................... 4 2. HOW OFTEN HOURLY CARE CAN BE USED .................................................................................................. 4 3. MAKING RESERVATIONS ............................................................................................................................. 5 4. IDENTIFYING SPACE FOR HOURLY CARE ...................................................................................................... 6 5. MANAGING OVER ENROLLMENT .................................................................................................................. 7 6. HANDLING SPECIAL NEEDS ISSUES .............................................................................................................. 7ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES ..................................................................................................................... 8 1. CYP DIRECTOR ........................................................................................................................................... 8 2. T&C SPECIALIST ......................................................................................................................................... 9 3. CYP LEAD ................................................................................................................................................ 10 4. CYP PROGRAM ASSISTANT ....................................................................................................................... 10 5. CYP OPERATIONS CLERK .......................................................................................................................... 10CDC CLASSROOM STRATEGIES ................................................................................................................... 15 1. PLANNING AND PREPARATION ................................................................................................................... 15 2. THE HOURLY CARE VISIT: CREATING RELATIONSHIPS ............................................................................... 20 3. REFLECT AND DOCUMENT ......................................................................................................................... 24SAC STRATEGIES .............................................................................................................................................. 25 1. PLANNING AND PREPARATION ................................................................................................................... 25 2. THE HOURLY CARE VISIT: CREATING RELATIONSHIPS ............................................................................... 27 3. REFLECT AND DOCUMENT ......................................................................................................................... 28TRAINING TIPS .................................................................................................................................................. 29 1. TRAINING.................................................................................................................................................. 29 2. CDC CLASSROOM OBSERVATIONS, COACHING, AND MODELING................................................................ 32APPENDIX A: FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ..................................................................................... 35APPENDIX B: RESERVATION LOG ............................................................................................................... 39APPENDIX C: RESERVATION CHECKLIST ................................................................................................. 43APPENDIX D: AVAILABLE SPACE TOOL INSTRUCTIONS ...................................................................... 47APPENDIX E: RESOURCES .............................................................................................................................. 51APPENDIX F: DAILY FORMS .......................................................................................................................... 57 i
    • Introduction IntroductionThe Hourly Care Guidebook and accompanying video are training tools developed to supportChild and Youth Program (CYP) Professionals with successful implementation of the hourlycare policy. CYP Professionals must work as a team to coordinate all aspects of hourly care inorder for it to run smoothly within the program. Everyone has an important role to play—fromCYP Operations Clerks who have initial contact with families, to CYP Directors who developprocedures to support implementation of the policy, to CYP Professionals in the classrooms whointegrate hourly children into the daily routine, and CYP Leads and Training and Curriculum(T&C) Specialists who provide support and training in classroom management.This guidebook and the accompanying video are based on accreditation standards from theNational Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) and the Council onAccreditation (COA). By incorporating strategies from the guidebook and video, you are layingthe foundation to ensure that the hourly care experience is positive for all children, families, andCYP Professionals. As such, Navy CYPs will continue to provide and enhance high-qualityprogramming for military children and families.1. DEFINING HOURLY CAREHourly care is an important service offered by the Navy CYP that supports military families whohave an occasional need for child care. While “drop-in” care has historically been offeredthroughout the Navy, the hourly care program is different in several important ways: • Use of vacancies as well as absences. Every day, CYPs have spaces that are not filled due to absences (e.g., spaces for children who are enrolled in the program but who are not present that day) and vacancies (e.g., open spaces). While absenteeism is often a result of children being sick or on vacation, vacancies can be attributed to reasons such as spaces not being filled in a timely manner and a lack of children on wait lists. While programs have systems in place for tracking vacancies, the hourly care program provides a system for predicting absences so parents can make reservations 30 days in advance. Until now, predicting absences has not been possible and parents could only make reservations on the same day that care was needed. • Acceptance of reservations up to 30 days in advance by using the Available Space Tool. The Available Space Tool was developed by Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) for the specific purpose of identifying spaces for the hourly care program. The tool provides calculations for (a) program-specific vacancy rates based on 1
    • Introduction predicted enrollment data and (b) absences based on Navy-wide trends. As such, families can rely on the Navy CYP to provide child care on the dates and times of the reservation and do not need to call the morning of the visit to determine whether space is available. With the tool, it is possible to accurately predict absences and accept and guarantee reservations in advance. • Provision of hourly care to any eligible family, regardless of the reason. Hourly care must be made available to all families who are eligible to receive care in the Child Development Center (CDC) or School Age Care (SAC) program. Reservations are taken on a “first-come, first serve” basis. The priorities used to place full-time children are not relevant for hourly care families. In addition, the reason families request care is irrelevant; parents can use hourly care for any reason. Information on how often parents can use the hourly care program has been incorporated into the hourly care policy in an effort to equalize access for all families. Guidance related to this and other policy requirements is described in the Hourly Care Guidance chapter. • Mandatory implementation by CDC and SAC programs. The hourly care program must be implemented by CDC and SAC programs. To ensure compliance, implementation of the hourly care program and use of the Available Space Tool will be added as an inspection item for fiscal year 2010.2. NEED FOR HOURLY CAREThere is growing demand for occasional child care for families living across the United Statesand abroad. Given the demands placed on military families, the need for occasional care can beparticularly relevant among this population. For instance, military families may live away fromtheir extended families and not have other support systems to assist with child care. When amilitary member is deployed, one parent must assume all child care responsibilities. In addition,military members who are on temporary assigned duty (TAD) or only have their children duringcertain weeks of the year because of separation or divorce may need additional assistance withdaily child care.Because hourly care can be used in any situation and for any reason, it ultimately helps meet thechild care needs of parents who require care other than full-time care. This includes parents whohave an intermittent need for child care because of work schedules, doctor visits, personalillness, and illness within the family. Hourly care also enables stay-at-home parents to takeadvantage of quality child care programs for their children, and all parents to tend to personalneeds such as shopping, taking a nap, or having lunch with friends.In addition, some parents may need support as they cope with daily or unique stressors, andhourly care can serve as respite and temporary relief from some of the stress and burden. Respite2
    • Introductioncare can directly contribute to reductions in stress and related mental/physical health problems,as well as increase the quality of life for family members. In addition to hourly care as respitecare, parents may need hourly care during emergencies.The hourly care policy was put into effect to address these challenges and meet the needs ofadditional military families. Because CYPs offer high-quality programming, employprofessionally trained early childhood and youth experts, and are tasked with supporting familiesto facilitate accomplishment of the Department of Defense (DoD) mission, an ideal solution tothe provision of occasional care for military families is to leverage the resources offered byCYPs.CNIC is dedicated to providing CYP Professionals with the resources needed to ensure that thehourly care initiative is a beneficial experience for everyone. This includes the provision of thisguidebook and the accompanying video, as well as other tools referenced in the guidebookdeveloped for the specific goal of ensuring that the hourly care program is a valuable andsuccessful experience.3. STRUCTURE OF THE GUIDEBOOKThis guidebook was written to accompany the hourly care video and is intended to be used as atraining and reference tool for CYP Program Assistants, CYP Leads, and T&C Specialists, aswell as a resource for CYP Operations Clerks. The guidebook includes the following chapters: • Hourly Care Guidance: Information on how programs should implement key components of the hourly care program. • Roles and Responsibilities: An overview of the roles and responsibilities for each CYP Professional, with detailed guidance for CYP Operations Clerks. • CDC Classroom Strategies: Detail on classroom strategies for successful implementation at CDCs, including information on the relationship between (a) hourly care strategies and accreditation standards and (b) hourly care strategies and the Creative Curriculum®, the required curriculum for CDCs. • SAC Strategies: Detail on strategies for successful implementation of the SAC program, including information on the relationship between hourly care strategies and accreditation standards. • Training Tips: Information for T&C Specialists to enhance the training of CYP Program Assistants related to the hourly care program. 3
    • Hourly Care Guidance Hourly Care GuidanceThe CYP hourly care policy was developed so that vacant and absent spaces can be made availableto parents in need of intermittent child care. CDC and SAC programs CONUS and OCONUS arerequired to implement the hourly care program, which includes taking reservations for hourly care30 days in advance. Parents may no longer be asked to confirm the availability of space on the daycare is needed; care is guaranteed when the reservation is made.Guidance on how to implement key components of the hourly care policy is provided in the nextsection. The policy is available in its entirety on the CYP Web site. In addition, appendix Aincludes answers to frequently asked questions related to hourly care.1. WHO CAN USE HOURLY CAREAny eligible parent requiring care other than full-time care can use hourly care in the CDC or SAC Using Hourly Careprogram. Hourly care may be used in any situation The Navy hourly care program can be used for anyand for any reason. The reasons parents seek hourly reason, including:care are irrelevant and should not be taken into  Tending to personal needs such as lunch with friendsaccount when hourly care arrangements are  Attending doctor visitssecured. In addition, the priorities used to place  Obtaining relief from daily stressorsfull-time children are not relevant for hourly care  Tending to emergency situationsfamilies. Hourly care spaces are available on a first- Reasons for care are irrelevant. Hourly care cancome, first-serve basis, and as a result, all parents be used in any situation for any reason.have equal access to spaces.2. HOW OFTEN HOURLY CARE CAN BE USEDPrograms should offer hourly care services to families during regular operating hours when childrenare present. On a regular basis, parents may not use hourly care in excess of the following: HOURLY CARE LIMITS Program Do Not Regularly Exceed Per Child Per Week CDC 25 hours SAC Before & After School 10 hours SAC Summer Camp 25 hours4
    • Hourly Care GuidanceTherefore, if a parent requests care at the CDC for 24 hours in a given week and space is available,the reservation should be taken. Similarly, if a parent requests care at the SAC program for 9 hoursin a given week and space is available, the reservation should be taken.There may be unique situations in which parents request more than the maximum number of hoursper week for a limited period (e.g., 26 hours of care for a week at the CDC; 15 hours of care a weekfor 2 subsequent weeks at the SAC program during the school year). When this occurs, the CYPDirector should determine whether this request can be accommodated.While hourly care is not intended to be offered full-time on a regular basis, full-week care can beprovided during emergency or special situations if space is available. For example, if a parent onlyhas their children a few weeks a year because of separation or divorce, it is acceptable for them touse full-time care at the CYP for a short period of time. In this instance the family would be chargeda weekly fee based on TFI. The intent of the hourly care policy is to accommodate the child careneeds of military families and fill as many spaces as possible. Therefore if space is available, theCYP should make every effort to meet the needs of families and serve the military community.3. MAKING RESERVATIONSParents may call the program to make a reservation for child care up to 30 days in advance or maywalk into the program and inquire about receiving Reservations: A Guarantee of Carecare immediately. Either method of requesting care(e.g., reservation or walk-in) is acceptable.  Once a reservation is made, the program guarantees care for the child at that program onPrograms must take reservations for hourly care up to the day and time for which care was requested30 days in advance. When space is reserved, the  Parents do not need to call back or wait until the day of the hourly care visit to confirm theirprogram guarantees that parents will receive care for reservationtheir child at that program on the day and time forwhich care was requested. Parents do not need to callback or wait until the day of the hourly care visit to confirm the visit.When parents inquire about the availability of hourly care spaces, the CYP Clerk or other CYPProfessional making the reservation should complete the Reservation Log. The log lists the totalnumber of hourly care spaces generated by the Available Space Tool. The log enables CYP Clerksto track the total number of available spaces, the number of spaces that have been reserved, and thenumber of parents who request care after spaces have been filled (e.g., hourly care wait list). 5
    • Hourly Care GuidanceCDC programs must track available spaces and reservations by age group. SAC programs musttrack spaces and reservations by program variation (e.g., Before and After School or SummerCamp). Reservation logs can be found in appendix B.A checklist with information to discuss with parents when reservations for hourly care are made canbe found in appendix C.4. IDENTIFYING SPACE FOR HOURLY CARECYP Professionals are required to use the Available Space Tool to calculate the number of hourlycare slots that are available for each program on a given day. This includes calculations for (a)program-specific vacancy rates based on predicted enrollment data and (b) absences based on Navy-wide trends.The Available Space Tool calculates absences based on Navy-wide trends. Therefore, it is notnecessary for programs to track absences at the program; the tool will make these predictions. Thetool is critical to successful implementation of hourly care because it provides the informationnecessary to make reservations up to 30 days in advance without knowledge of planned absences.However, it is still important to use all available information to fill spaces at the CYP. For example,if the tool calculates zero (0) hourly care spaces and the CYP Director knows that a child will be onvacation that week, use these spaces for hourly care. Continue to track vacancies (e.g., open spaces)and enter this program-specific data into the Available Space Tool.Because the number of hourly care spaces fluctuates with changes in capacity and enrollment, thetool must be completed weekly. This way, changes to enrollment will be captured and programs willbe provided accurate data related to the number ofavailable hourly care spaces. Available Space Tool  Programs MUST take reservations 30 days inThe Available Space Tool was developed after an advance by using the Available Space Toolin-depth analysis of data from CDC and SAC  The Available Space Tool calculates theprograms across the Navy related to factors such as number of available hourly care spaces within each program on a given daycapacity, enrollment, program size, and child age.  Knowledge of planned absences is not neededFollowing these statistical analyses, the hourly care to schedule hourly care visits (but can beprogram was piloted to determine the effectiveness helpful)and utility of the Available Space Tool.  Use the Available Space Tool weekly to obtain accurate data related to the number of hourlyAdjustments were then made to the tool to care spacesincorporate lessons learned from the pilot sites and6
    • Hourly Care Guidanceminimize the chances that programs will exceed ratio requirements. CNIC will continue to monitorthe effectiveness and utility of the Available Space Tool and make adjustments as necessary basedon feedback from the field.Step-by-step instructions on use of the Available Space Tool are provided in appendix D.5. MANAGING OVER ENROLLMENTThe Available Space Tool was designed to prevent over enrollment as much as possible. In theunlikely event that over enrollment does occur, a program must have a plan to resolve the situation.This plan will vary at each program based on the specific needs of the program and the availabilityof resources, but it may include the following: • Sharing of CYP Professionals among programs • Increasing the number of “on-call” flexible CYP Professionals • Moving full-time CDC children who are ready to transition to an older classroom to that room for the day.While it is acceptable to exceed group size for a few hours, ratios within the classroom must bemaintained at all times.6. HANDLING SPECIAL NEEDS ISSUESThe CYP Operations Clerk should ask the parent requesting care whether their child requires anyspecial accommodations or has special needs. The childs file should be reviewed by the SpecialNeeds Review Board if (a) the CYP Director has concerns about the program’s ability to care forparticular children, (b) additional training is needed for CYP Professionals in order to appropriatelyserve particular children, or (c) children with special needs will use the program regularly.Children should not be denied care because of special needs, and programs must make every effortto accept the children into the hourly care program. 7
    • Roles and Responsibilities Roles and ResponsibilitiesAll CYP Professionals play an important role in implementing the hourly care policy. Majorresponsibilities of the CYP Director are summarized first, followed by responsibilities of the T&CSpecialist, CYP Leads, CYP Program Assistants, and CYP Operations Clerks. In addition to ageneral description of roles and responsibilities of CYP Operations Clerks, specific steps to beundertaken by these individuals are included in this chapter.Additional information relevant to CYP Leads and Program Assistants can be found in the CDCClassroom Strategies and SAC Strategies chapters. Information relevant to the T&C Specialist isavailable in the Training Tips chapter.1. CYP DIRECTORThe CYP Director is responsible for ensuring that adequate systems and procedures are in place tosupport implementation of the program and for presenting the program in a positive way. Withoutadequate processes and CYP Professionals who support the program, the hourly care program canbe confusing and stressful for children, families, and CYP Professionals. The CYP Director shouldensure that the following procedures have been developed at a minimum, have been communicatedand are understood by all CYP Professionals, and are revised when needed to ensure smoothoperation of the hourly care program. • Marketing the hourly care program • Sharing information with parents when they inquire about the hourly care program, including a checklist of items to discuss with parents and creation of new documents specific to hourly care • Registering hourly care families, including a process for disseminating, collecting, and Role of the CYP Director reviewing the required paperwork While many of these tasks are conducted by other • Tracking reservations and placing children in CYP Professionals, the CYP Director is responsible CDC classrooms for developing, monitoring, and revising systems • Tracking children on an hourly care wait list and processes to support implementation of the hourly care program. • Communicating reservation details to all CYP Professionals, including the CYP Director, T&C Specialist, CYP Leads, and CYP Program Assistants • Escorting new families to assigned CDC classrooms8
    • Roles and Responsibilities • Monitoring hourly care families’ actual arrival and departure times compared to their scheduled arrival and departure times so fees can be calculated correctly • Collecting and tracking fees • Creating a system for filing hourly care documentation • Coordinating plans to resolve possible over enrollment situations.In sum, CYP Directors are responsible for ensuring that the hourly care program is implementedsuccessfully. This includes keeping all CYP Professionals focused on the importance of the hourlycare program to military families, ensuring that the intent of the program is clearly communicated toeveryone involved, and ensuring that expectations and roles are clear among all CYP Professionals.For instance, the CYP Director should ensure that CYP Program Assistants and Leads understandthat specific classroom assignments often cannot be made until the morning of the hourly care visit,and that advance notice of hourly care visits may not always be possible. Anticipating andclarifying this and other implementation issues is key to reducing communication problems andconfusion related to implementation of the hourly care program.Effectively marketing and communicating the key elements of the hourly care program on the baseis critical. Not only will parents benefit from clear messages about how the program operates, butreferring organizations will obtain a better understanding of the premise of the policy. Without thisinformation, referring organizations may unintentionally misinform parents about the hourly carepolicy. Market the hourly care program at Command indocs, clinics, Fleet and Family Support, withombudsman, and with the Command Master Chief. If miscommunication occurs, take the time toclarify the purpose, intent, and details of the hourly care program with other organizations andindividuals on base.Effectively communicating the hourly care policy to CYP Professionals is an equally important taskof the CYP Director. Directors must present the program in a positive way and provide thenecessary support to all CYP Professionals to ensure the program’s success. This includes workingwith the Resource and Referral office so these individuals understand the hourly care policy and arebetter able to market it effectively and refer families appropriately to the hourly care program.2. T&C SPECIALISTThe T&C Specialist is responsible for ensuring that all CYP Professionals have received training onthe hourly care program, clearly understand their roles in the program, and have the skills necessaryfor successful implementation.In addition to training, T&C Specialists are required to conduct observations of CDC ProgramAssistants during hourly care visits, role model different strategies for working with children and 9
    • Roles and Responsibilitiesfamilies in the classroom, and offer individualized coaching to support Program Assistants andLeads. The Training Tips chapter provides additional guidance for T&C Specialists.3. CYP LEADThe primary role of the CYP Lead as it relates to the hourly care program is to support CYPProgram Assistants with implementation of the program on a daily basis. This may involvereinforcing the training that Program Assistants received from the T&C Specialist by role modelingstrategies in the classroom or providing additional tips related to classroom management. Inaddition, Leads may also work with the regularly enrolled children in the classroom to provideProgram Assistants opportunities to comfort hourly care children who are having particularlydifficult separations from their parents or provide individualized attention for these children duringtransitions such as lunch or nap.Regardless of the specific support provided, CYP Leads play an important role in implementing thehourly care program and must be aware of the number of hourly care children in a facility on agiven day, and be available to help CYP Program Assistants in any way possible. This includesbecoming proficient with the strategies outlined in the CDC Classroom Strategies and SACStrategies chapters and supporting Program Assistants with implementation of these strategies.4. CYP PROGRAM ASSISTANTThe primary role of the CYP Program Assistant is to integrate hourly care families and children intothe daily routine and ensure that transitions are as smooth as possible. This requires implementationof many strategies that are already in place—careful planning, good communication, transitiontechniques, and strategies for working with any new family or child. Having well established, strongclassroom routines are critical to successful classroom management in general. These sameprinciples will ease the transition of new children into the classroom or program. Additionalstrategies to support CYP Program Assistants with successful implementation of the hourly careprogram are outlined in the CDC Classroom Strategies and SAC Strategies chapters. ProgramAssistants are required to read these strategies and incorporate new systems into their dailyactivities.5. CYP OPERATIONS CLERKCYP Operations Clerks play a crucial role in coordinating and implementing the hourly care policy.They are responsible for determining the number of hourly care spaces available on a daily basis,explaining the program to parents, reserving space, collecting registration materials, communicating10
    • Roles and Responsibilitieshourly care reservations to other CYP Professionals, monitoring use of the hourly care program,collecting the appropriate fees from parents, and welcoming children and families to the programupon arrival. As noted, the CYP Director is responsible for ensuring that these processes are inplace, and the T&C Specialist is responsible for ensuring that the Operations Clerk understandshis/her role and has received sufficient training to be successful. A step-by-step description ofOperations Clerks’ responsibilities is provided next.5.1 Use the Available Space Tool to Calculate Spaces • Receive training on the Available Space Tool in order to understand the core principles related to calculation of hourly care spaces. • Use the Available Space Tool weekly to determine the number of hourly care spaces available.5.2 Prepare Reservation Logs • Complete the Reservation Log by transferring the “Total Hourly Care Spaces” number from the Available Space Tool to the reservation log “spaces” column. • Create enough reservation logs – one for each week in a 30-day period – in order to have the information needed to take reservations up to 30 days in advance.5.3 Explain the Hourly Care Program to Parents • Be knowledgeable about all aspects of the hourly care program. Keep a copy of the Hourly Care Policy letter and Hourly Care Guidebook available as a resource. • When parents call requesting information about the hourly care program, explain that reservations can be made 30 days in advance on a first-come, first-serve basis. • Explain the fee policy to parents, which includes information related to extensions, cancellations, and no-shows. • Explain the child registration and attendance requirements to parents and answer any questions they may have about the hourly care program or the CYP in general.5.4 Reserve Space • Refer to the Reservation Checklist in appendix C for a list of items to discuss with parents. • If space is available, use the Reservation Log (see appendix B) to take a reservation. Record information about the hourly care visit, including the first and last name of the parent and child, parent’s telephone number, child’s age, date and time care is requested, and any comments about the child or parent. Remember to ask parents if their child has any special needs, including allergies, and whether their child will be taking medication during the visit. 11
    • Roles and Responsibilities • CDC-specific information: Because specific classroom assignments for CDC programs often cannot be made until the morning of the hourly care visit, this information is typically not recorded at the time the reservation is made. • SAC-specific information: When making a reservation at the SAC program, determine whether transportation can be provided, and if so, make these arrangements and make a notation on the Reservation Log. • Once hourly care spaces have been filled, create a wait list by placing names of parents requesting care on the Reservation Log and writing “Wait List” under the “Reserved Space or Wait List” column. Contact parents on the wait list if there is a cancellation or if additional space is available on the day for which the care was requested.5.5 Distribute Welcome Materials to First Time Parents • Distribute welcome materials to first time parents with basic information about the program and all required forms. As noted, the CYP Director will identify the content of this informational package and ensure that documents specific to the hourly care program are created as needed. • Welcome materials may include the following: o Information specific to hourly care, such as a one-page information sheet o List of required supplies (e.g., diapers and bottles for infants, toothbrushes for preschoolers, packed lunches for SAC children) o Sample CDC classroom schedule/SAC program activity list so parents understand the general structure of the day for the age of care requested and can communicate this to their child o For the CDC, a checklist of suggested comfort items for their child (e.g., family photograph, taped lullabies, favorite toy, stuffed animal) o For the CDC, information on the Creative Curriculum® specific to their child’s age group • Welcome materials must include the following required CNIC registration forms. Hourly care can not be provided until these documents have been completed, except in emergency situations. o CNICCYP 1700/04, Navy CYP Registration Form o Parent Hourly Care Fee Agreement o For CDC, CNICCYP 1700/07, Navy CYP Child and Family Profile, a form that may ease transition issues and provide information needed for CYP Program Assistants to more effectively integrate children into the classroom or program o Field Trip Permission Form o Photo Permission Form12
    • Roles and Responsibilities o CNICCYP 1700/08, Navy CYP Medical Authorization Form, if applicable o Immunization records (required within 30 days of first hourly care visit) for CDC children, or documentation as outlined in OPNAV 1700.9E explaining why the child is not immunized o Special needs information, if applicable.5.6 Encourage First Time Parents to Tour the Program • Encourage new parents to visit the program prior to the child’s first hourly care visit. • Explain to parents how a tour of the program can assist their child’s transition to the program by increasing their familiarity with the program. • Using the process put into place by the CYP Director, make arrangements for a parent orientation session or tour of the facility.5.7 Place CDC Children in Age-Appropriate Classrooms • At the CDC, work with the entire team to determine the best placements for CDC children. Because the Available Space Tool calculates spaces by age group rather than by classroom, these placements often cannot be made until the morning of the hourly care visit. • When possible, place hourly care children in the same CDC classroom on subsequent visits to ensure continuity of care. This helps children feel a sense of belonging and greater sense of security.5.8 Share Information With CYP Professionals • Share hourly care reservation details with the CYP Director, T&C Specialist, CYP Leads, CYP Program Assistants, and the CYP Cook. This includes telling management when reservations are made and sharing information with CYP Program Assistants after classroom assignments have been made. • Use the system created by the CYP Director to share information. For example, the Director may ask Clerks give Program Assistants a copy of the Reservation Log and the completed Navy CYP Child and Family Profile form. • Critical information to share includes the parent’s name and contact number; name and age of the child; date of the visit; planned arrival and departure times; any special considerations such as allergies, special needs, and medications; and if transportation will be provided for SAC children. • At the CDC, implement the system developed by the CYP Director for communicating which classroom hourly care children will be placed so any CYP Professional can direct the child and parent to the appropriate classroom during their visit. The process might include placing the completed Registration Log in an easily accessible location at the front desk for any CYP 13
    • Roles and Responsibilities Professional to review. Communicating classroom assignments for hourly care children helps ensure a smooth drop off for families, especially if the Operations Clerk steps away from the front desk.5.9 Collect, Review, and File Registration Materials • Collect all required registration forms during the initial visit. • Review the forms to ensure that each is completed correctly. • Using the system created by the CYP Director, file registration materials for each child participating in the hourly care program. Maintain files for hourly care children in a separate area from full-time children’s files so both sets of files can be accessed easily.5.10 Monitor Arrival • Greet parents upon arrival and remind them to sign in. • At the CDC, using the system put in place by the CYP Director, notify a CYP Professional (e.g., T&C Specialist, CYP Lead, CYP Director) that a new family is at the front desk and ready to be escorted to their assigned classroom. This ensures that parents know where to drop-off their children and sets a welcoming tone.5.11 Calculate and Collect Fees • Using actual arrival and departure information, calculate fees, and collect payment from parents. Payment must be made at the end of each hourly visit. • Thank parents for visiting and encourage them to come again.14
    • CDC Classroom Strategies CDC Classroom StrategiesThe purpose of this chapter is to provide CYP Program Assistants and Leads in CDCs with thestrategies needed to successfully implement hourly care. CNIC is dedicated to ensuring high qualityin all Navy CYPs and achieves this in part through regulations, annual inspections, and requiredaccreditation. Accreditation standards from NAEYC support the Navy’s goal of meeting highstandards across all its programs. NAEYC accreditation requires that programs are offered withconsistent procedures, careful planning, and thorough implementation. Hourly care, as one of theprograms offered by Navy CYPs, is held to these same standards. Hourly care should be treated as apart of regular programming so it becomes an expected and consistent part of the curriculum anddaily routine in CDC classrooms.The Creative Curriculum®, the required curriculum for Navy CDCs, is aligned with NAEYCaccreditation standards and provides the philosophy, structure, and strategies for programs to meetthe standards. The Creative Curriculum® also provides support for implementing hourly care in theclassroom. The curriculum’s strategies for planning, setting up the environment, building classroomcommunity and creating positive relationships are all relevant to successfully incorporating hourlycare into regular programming.Strategies for incorporating hourly care into CDC classrooms are presented in the following threesections:• Planning and Preparation• The Hourly Care Visit: Creating Relationships• Reflect and Document.Each section provides information on the alignment of hourly care strategies with NAEYCaccreditation standards and the Creative Curriculum®, and outlines specific steps to follow so thathourly care is incorporated smoothly into the daily routine.1. PLANNING AND PREPARATIONWhen hourly care is expected and planned for as part of each day, CYP Program Assistants, Leads,children, and families are prepared for its occurrence, and children are incorporated more easily intothe routine. As stated in the Creative Curriculum®, “A daily schedule establishes the consistencythat helps young children to predict the sequence of events and thus to feel more secure and more incontrol of their day.” 15
    • CDC Classroom StrategiesPlanning and preparing for hourly care includes the following components, which are described inmore detail within this section: • Incorporate hourly care into regular planning sessions • Prepare the environment and gather materials • Build classroom community.1.1 Incorporate Hourly Care Into Regular Planning SessionsDuring regular planning sessions, all elements of the hourly care program should be planned and/orreviewed to ensure the continual seamless integration of the program into the daily routine. It isimportant to work as a team to welcome and transition visiting children into the program. Leads canprovide additional support by modeling, clarifying implementation strategies, and assisting in theclassrooms; T&C Specialists can observe and share classroom management strategies. Thefollowing steps should be followed during planning sessions.Create and Review the Hourly Care Communication SystemHourly care communication systems are designed to keep everyone informed of visiting children.While communication systems may vary at each CYP, each classroom must have the following: • A place to keep information on visiting children such as the Navy CYP Child and Family Profile and a copy of the Reservation Log. The designated space could be a clipboard, bulletin board, or other common area accessible to all Program Assistants and Leads working in the classroom. • A message board outside the door of the classroom that welcomes visiting children and their families and informs other families of visitors to the program.Discussing the effectiveness of the communication system and making adjustments as needed isimportant. During planning sessions, ensure that one CYP Program Assistant in each classroom isdesignated to post a welcome message outside the classroom.Plan for Arrival of Children Throughout the DayPlan for the arrival of visiting children during all times of the day, including meals and nap.Consider the following questions: • Where will the children sit during a group activity? • Where will the children who arrive during lunch or snack time sit? • Where will the children rest?16
    • CDC Classroom Strategies • Who will be available at each of these times to assist the children with routine activities?Careful, thorough planning for the arrival of visiting children at different times of the dayminimizes disruption by helping children blend into the existing program more quickly and allowsCYP Program Assistants to focus on the needs of all children so routine activities continue tooperate smoothly.1.2 Prepare the Environment and Gather MaterialsThe Creative Curriculum® states, “A physical setting that is safe, attractive, comfortable and welldesigned helps children engage in the activities offered.” Thoughtfully setting up the environmentfor visiting children helps them feel comfortable, transition into the classroom more easily, and feellike a part of the ongoing program. The following sections outline steps that should be taken toprepare the environment, including preparation of materials.Create and Maintain an Hourly Care KitCreate and maintain an hourly care kit so that materials used during hourly care visits are readilyaccessible if needed. Check the contents of the kit periodically and replenish materials as needed. Aplastic bin, sturdy box, or basket can be used for the container. The kit contains items to meet thefollowing purposes and should be adapted to meet the needs of each age group and tailored to theneeds of particular children who visit more often: • Materials to identify the child’s cubby or basket for their belongings or to label items from home (labels, markers, name tags) • Comfort items to help children during transitions o For children of all ages, a comfort item might include a stuffed animal o For infants, comfort items might include items that can be held such as a rattle, teething ring, and plastic keys, or a CD with lullabies o For toddlers and preschoolers, a comfort item might include small cars • A plastic frame or photo album for a picture from home • A welcome puppet (e.g., familiar animal or pet such as a dog, cat, teddy bear, or rabbit) • Books to be used at resting time or to ease transitions (See children’s books in appendix E). o For infants, include board books with pictures of babies and other familiar items, such as “Baby Faces Board Book” by Roberta Intrater o For pretoddlers, include board books about family and friends, such as “Who Loves You, Baby?” by Nina Laden o For toddlers, include books about coming to school, such as “Spot Goes to School” by Eric Hill 17
    • CDC Classroom Strategies o For preschoolers, include books about coming to school, such as “Wemberly Worried” by Kevin Henkes • Resources for parents on separation anxiety, child development, and strategies for saying goodbye (See appendix E) • Camera and printer (or Polaroid camera if a printer is not available) to take the children’s pictures for their cubbies, a visiting friends board or album, and to share with parents at pick- up. Pictures can also be taken of parents for children to look at during their visits • Message board (if one is not already in place outside the door to the classroom) and dry-erase markers to let other families know when there is a visitor • Daily care forms to collect information on the child and give to parents at the end of the visit (See appendix F).Designate Space for Hourly Care Children’s BelongingsIdentify a cubby or basket to be used for visiting children. Use the supplies in the hourly care kit tomake a name tag for the cubby or basket. Labeling the cubby or basket with children’s namesand/or pictures helps ensure the parents and children feel welcome and part of the classroom.Refresh the Cozy SpaceThe Creative Curriculum® provides information on creating a place where children can be alone(e.g., a cozy space). This is a place where children can be by themselves, with an adult, or with oneor two other children until they are comfortable joining the group. A cozy space can be helpful forvisiting children who have difficulty transitioning. Check the materials in the designated cozy spaceweekly and refresh it as needed to include soft Cozy Spaces for Infants and Pretoddlersplaces to sit, stuffed animals, books, and soothingmusic. Be sure this area is inviting, neatly arranged, For infants and pretoddlers, the appropriate cozyand placed where children can still observe space is often in a Program Assistant’s arms or lap.classroom interactions and activities.Create and Update the Visiting Friends Board or AlbumAll classrooms must have a visiting friend’s board or picture album. Check periodically to ensurethat all pictures of visiting children taken during the previous week have been added to the board oralbum, and that all photographs are labeled with the visiting children’s names and date of their visit.The purpose of the board or album is to reflect the visiting children in the environment and involvethe regularly enrolled children in talking about friends who have visited their classroom.18
    • CDC Classroom Strategies1.3 Build Classroom CommunityCommunity building in the classroom is a cornerstone of the Creative Curriculum®. The curriculumdefines community as a place in the classroom where children know they are safe both physicallyand emotionally so that all children have a sense of belonging and rejection or hurtful behavior isminimized. Hourly care provides additional opportunities to help children develop the skills neededto create a community of caring. By implementing the following steps, children are supported inwelcoming new friends into their classroom.Share Stories That Support the Classroom CommunityIncorporate stories with themes related to making friends, coming to new places, starting school,and saying goodbye to help the children relate to feelings of visiting children. These books can beread as a planned group activity or individually, and can be shared with both regularly enrolledchildren and visitors. A selection of children’s books is provided in appendix E.Talk About Visiting Friends With the ChildrenTalk with the children about new friends coming into the classroom and joining them in theiractivities. The Creative Curriculum® recognizes that children’s classroom community includeslearning to develop friendships. CYP Program Assistants must help children learn to connect withothers, develop positive relationships, and negotiate conflicts. Conversation about new friends isappropriate for infants as well as older children.Refer to the Visiting Friends Board or AlbumLook at the pictures of friends who visited the classroom periodically as a part of morning circle ormorning activities. Sharing memories of thechildren who have visited conveys respect and Referring to the Visiting Friends Board: Infants and Pretoddlerscaring and sends a message that everyone belongsto the community, even if they only visit for a short This activity can be conducted one-on-one or in aperiod of time. Ask the children the following small group using a photo album that the children can easily handle.questions: • What do they remember about each friend who visited? • Who do they think might be coming today? • What do they think their friends who are not coming in today might be doing? 19
    • CDC Classroom StrategiesInform the Children as Soon as PossibleWhen information is received about an hourly carevisit to a particular classroom, inform the children Informing Pretoddlers and Toddlersright away so they can be prepared. Advance notice,even on the morning of the hourly care visit, helps Pretoddlers and toddlers are especially concerned when someone enters the classroom. Telling themchildren prepare for a possible change to the routine in advance about the visit and looking at a picturethat often occurs when someone new transitions into of the visiting child if one is available can help allay those concerns.the group.Implement a “Buddy” System in Preschool ClassroomsInclude preschool children in planning for and engaging with visiting children by encouraging themto be a “buddy” for visitors. Involve them in determining the role of the buddy as someone whohelps visitors feel welcome by engaging them in activities and introducing them to other friends inthe program. The job of buddy should be added to the job chart, as recommended in the CreativeCurriculum®.2. THE HOURLY CARE VISIT: CREATING RELATIONSHIPSAn hourly care visit begins when the children and families enter the classroom. The strategiesidentified in this section are targeted to address critical transition periods and are provided in theorder below: • Arrival – greeting and welcoming families into the classroom • Transition into the routine – helping children engage with CYP Professionals, other children, and activities • Departure – helping children transition back to the parents and ending the visit positively.2.1 ArrivalThe arrival of families into the classroom is a critical time for the success of the hourly careprogram. First impressions are often lasting impressions. NAEYC expects CYP Program Assistantsto use a welcoming tone and greet children and families in an open and supportive manner. Thesteps below should be followed during the arrival of visiting children and families.20
    • CDC Classroom StrategiesReview Information About Hourly ChildrenRead the information provided by the CYP Operations Clerk about the visiting children andfamilies. This may include the Navy CYP Child and Family Profile and Reservation Log.Warmly Welcome Children and ParentsCYP Program Assistants should warmly welcome children and families into the classroom. This isimportant for all families but especially important when someone uses the program occasionally.The impression made may influence parents’ decision for future hourly visits or for consideringfull-time care. Providing a warm welcome for hourly care parents and children also influences thecomfort level of visiting children and may positively influence the reactions of the other children tohaving a new member in classroom for the day.Help parents sign in, label items from home using materials from the hourly care kit, and put thechildren’s belongings in the cubbies or baskets labeled with their names or photographs. This sendsa message to parents and children that they are welcome in your classroom.Ask parents to complete their portion of the daily care form– a form that is required for all hourlycare children. Assure them of your training and experience in working with children so parents feelsecure leaving their children for the day. Providing this information builds trust, a conceptemphasized in the Creative Curriculum®.Answer Parents’ QuestionsTake time to answer parents’ questions related to the daily schedule, activities, supervision, meals,and nap times. The Creative Curriculum® requires the daily schedule to be posted for parents on theparent bulletin board along with the menu and pictures of children participating in various activities.Refer parents to this schedule and provide them with a copy if requested.2.2 Transition Into the RoutineAfter greeting the children and parents, help the children transition into the classroom and becomeengaged in the routine and with the other children. Follow these steps to help visiting children makethat transition.Encourage a Positive SeparationHelp parents separate from their children—encourage them to stay a few minutes while theirchildren get settled and then say goodbye. If the children are upset, reassure the parents that their 21
    • CDC Classroom Strategieschild’s response is normal. Inform the parents that you have strategies for helping childrentransition comfortably into the classroom routine. Talk in a warm, caring, comforting tone to bothparents and children. Provide parents with articles from the hourly care kit on separation anxietyand/or saying goodbye. Let parents know they can check on their children throughout the day.Easing anxiety for both parents and children will result in an easier day for everyone.In Preschool Classrooms, Introduce Visiting Children to Their BuddyIntroduce preschool visiting children to their buddy and help the buddy show the visiting friendaround the room, introduce the visitor to the regularly enrolled children, and invite the visitor toengage in activities.Provide Comfort Items and/or Transition Time and SpaceThe Creative Curriculum® provides guidance for transitions that are relaxed, smooth, and plannedahead of time. If visiting children are upset or hesitant, offer them a comfort item from the hourlycare kit appropriate for their age. Provide physical comfort by holding upset children or letting themsit on your lap near the other children. If parents bring a picture from home, put it in a frame oralbum from your hourly care kit and place it where the child can see it during the visit. Separationcan be easier to deal with when relieved by the pleasure of reunion, and photos can help serve thatpurpose. For toddlers and preschoolers, show them the cozy space and let them know it is okay tobe there until they are ready to join the other children.Assist Children to Engage in an Activity and With Other ChildrenNAEYC criteria state that staff interact and engage with all children to support their entering intoactivities, engaging in social opportunities, and Engaging Infants and Pretoddlersexperiencing overall success throughout their visit.Support visiting children as they transition into the Infants and pretoddlers often need the reassurancedaily routine and activities. For nonverbal children, from a CYP Program Assistant even once they haveif information is available about children’s favorite become engaged in an activity.activities or toys, engage them in those activities. Ifnot, show them choices in the classroom to determine their interests. Once they are engaged, staynearby to offer support as needed.Provide Additional Support at Meal Times and NapBe available during meals and at nap time to provide additional support to visiting children. Visitingchildren who are new to the program will be unfamiliar with the routines and may require additionalsupport during routines. This is especially true for infants, pretoddlers, and toddlers who may havevery different routines for meals at home. Visiting children also may not have experience serving22
    • CDC Classroom Strategiesthemselves or pouring their own milk. Because visiting children may not sleep, place their cotswhere they can easily look at books or play quietly without disturbing other children. Becomingfamiliar with the napping routines of hourly care children and the ways parents comfort them athome is helpful.2.3 DepartureThe end of the hourly care visit provides another opportunity to create relationships with parents orother family members who pick up the children. Once again, planning and preparation are keys tomaking pick up time successful. Implement the following strategies for a successful departure.Be Ready for Parents’ ArrivalCheck the Reservation Log to determine what time parents plan to pick up their children. Preparethe children if necessary (i.e., trip to bathroom or diaper change, cleanup of an activity) and gathertheir belongings before the parents arrive.Share Information About the DayNAEYC requires CYP Professionals to build positive relationships with families and share valuableinformation regarding their children’s day. Completethe daily care form – a form that is required for all Departure Tipshourly care children – so this can be provided to Younger children might start to cry when they see their parent. If this happens, reassure parents thatparents to inform them about the routines and the tears are more about loving the parent thanactivities. The CYP Program Assistant should step about being unhappy in the situation.away from activities to talk with parents and shareinformation for a smooth transition out of the program. If The child is learning how ofbe away from the parent pictures were taken to the children during and crying is a normal coping technique for children.the day or if the children completed a project, give these to the parents as a reminder of the visitalong with the daily care form.Encourage Another VisitEncourage the parents to stay with their children in the classroom at the end of the visit so parentsand children will feel more comfortable for the next visit. In addition, if parents plan to bring theirchildren back for another hourly visit and the day was a difficult one, encourage the parents to comeback and stay with their children between hourly care visits. 23
    • CDC Classroom Strategies3. REFLECT AND DOCUMENTEach hourly care visit provides opportunities to increase the overall quality of this service within theregular program. Reflection and documentation are essential components of completing theplanning and implementation process. After each visit, follow these steps:3.1 Reflect on Each Hourly VisitReflect on each hourly care visit and identify what went well and any challenges that occurred.Discuss these ideas during the next planning session and brainstorm strategies to improve theprovision of hourly care in the future. Leads and T&C Specialists can provide additional ideas andsupport.3.2 Record and File Information About the Hourly VisitUsing the system created by the CYP Director, file a copy of the daily care form for each hourlycare visit. Add information on successes and challenges from the reflection process to the daily careform, as well as strategies that can be used to assist the children during their next visits.24
    • SAC Strategies SAC StrategiesThe purpose of this chapter is to provide CYP Program Assistants and Leads with strategies toincorporate hourly care into the SAC program. CNIC is dedicated to ensuring high quality in allNavy CYPs and achieves this in part through regulations, annual inspections, and requiredaccreditation. Accreditation standards from COA support the Navy’s goal of meeting high standardsacross all its programs. Hourly care, as one of the programs offered by Navy CYPs, is held to thesesame standards. When hourly care is included as a part of regular programming, it becomes anexpected and consistent part of the daily activities in the SAC program.Strategies for incorporating hourly care into SAC programs are presented in the following threesections:• Planning and Preparation• The Hourly Care Visit: Creating Relationships• Reflect and Document.1. PLANNING AND PREPARATIONImplementation of hourly care in SAC programs requires fewer strategies because the children areolder and in most cases they know each other from school or the neighborhood. Even so, it is stillimportant for Program Assistants to plan, prepare the environment, build community, createpositive relationships, and document hourly care visits. Planning will prepare Program Assistants toaddress any unique situations that may arise.During regular planning sessions, the hourly care program should be planned for and reviewed toensure its continual seamless integration into the regular program. COA standards require planningfor a classroom environment that is well organized, comfortable, and inviting that encourages eachchild to explore, discover and experiment. The following steps should be included during planningsessions.1.1 Create and Review the Hourly Care Communication SystemHourly care communication systems are designed to keep everyone informed of visiting childrencoming into the program each day. Each SAC program must have a place where information onhourly care children is available to all CYP Professionals working in the program. The designated 25
    • SAC Strategiesspace could be a clipboard, bulletin board, or other common area accessible to all ProgramAssistants and Leads.Clear communication is especially important when transportation is needed for hourly care childrento and from school. This is a new process for the children. Providing information for all CYPProfessionals in the program ensures children arrive safely at their destinations.Discussing the effectiveness of the communication system and making adjustments as needed isimportant to ensure everyone has the information needed to welcome hourly care children andparents into the SAC program.1.2 Designate Space for Hourly Care Children’s BelongingsIdentify cubbies or lockers to be used by visiting children. Labeling cubbies or lockers withchildren’s names helps ensure that the children feel welcome and part of the SAC program.1.3 Build CommunityBuild community in the program by talking with the regularly enrolled SAC children about newfriends. Many of the hourly care children may already know the regularly enrolled children fromschool and/or neighborhoods. Program Assistants must help all children learn to connect withothers and develop positive relationships. Hourly care offers visiting and regularly enrolledchildren opportunities to develop these social skills.Hourly care provides opportunities for SAC children to develop social competence. Include SACchildren in planning for and engaging with visiting children by encouraging them to welcomevisitors, engage with them in activities, and introduce them to other friends in the program. Ifvisiting children are new to the installation or program they might appreciate having a “buddy” atthe beginning of their visit to help them become acquainted with the program and the children.Discuss the concept of being a “buddy” to determine who might be interested and what they think a“buddy” could do to help new children transition into the program.Ensure that children who are new to the installation have been identified by the Youth SponsorshipProgram and have been provided with a peer mentor. A peer mentor can provide tours of theprogram, invitations to upcoming events, and information about the local area. Ideally mentors haveshared interests or are from the same school or neighborhood.26
    • SAC Strategies2. THE HOURLY CARE VISIT: CREATING RELATIONSHIPSThe strategies identified in this section address arrival, transition into the program, and departure ofthe hourly care children. Preparation and communication play a part in ensuring that these visits arecomfortable and trouble-free for everyone.2.1 Welcome Hourly Care Children into the ProgramEnsure that all hourly care children and their parents are warmly welcomed into the SAC program.COA standards require greeting children and families in an open and supportive manner,welcoming children by name, and assisting them to engage successfully into the new environment.Show the children the space that has been designated for their belongings and answer any questionsthe parents and/or children have about the program and daily activities. Talk with the childrenabout their interests and help them find an activity that they enjoy.2.2 Ensure Hourly Care Children are Engaged and ComfortableProgram Assistants and Leads should ensure all hourly care children engage in activities they enjoyand connect with other children in the SAC program. While most children will transition easily intothe program, some hourly care children may be shy or slow to warm up, especially if they are newto the installation or have come to the SAC program for the first time. In these situations, call on a“buddy” or the peer mentor from the Youth Sponsorship Program to introduce the visiting childrento other friends and include them in activities. Try to match the visitors with children who attendtheir school or live in their neighborhood.2.3 Share Information about the Day with ParentsEstablish open communication with parents and share information with them about their children’sday and ask if there are any concerns. This is also a COA standard and lets parents know you areavailable if they have questions about the SAC program or about the visits. Also share informationabout the other Youth Programs and special events and encourage them to participate. 27
    • SAC Strategies3. REFLECT AND DOCUMENTEach hourly care visit provides an opportunity to increase the overall quality of this service withinthe regular SAC program. Reflection and documentation are essential components of completingthe planning and implementation process.Reflect on each hourly care visit and identify what went well, any challenges that occurred, andstrategies that might be used during future visits. Document information that would be helpful toother CYP Professionals for future visits and file the information using the system created by theCYP Director.28
    • Training Tips Training TipsThis chapter provides tips for the T&C Specialist to use when conducting hourly care trainingsessions for CYP Professionals as well as strategies related to conducting classroom observationsand modeling. The information is organized to support both the video and the guidebook.Each section provides specific training tips and questions for discussion related to the objective ofthe section.1. TRAININGAll CYP Professionals are required to have training related to hourly care. Training is best dividedinto at least two segments. The first segment should focus on the overall purpose of the hourly careprogram and the roles and responsibilities of all CYP Professionals. The second segment should betailored specifically for the following three groups and should focus on specific duties: (a)Operations Clerks, (b) Program Assistants and Leads in CDC classrooms, and (c) SAC ProgramAssistants and Leads.1.1 Hourly Care Overview TrainingThe purpose of the “Hourly Care Overview” training session is to provide information on thepurpose and goals of hourly care, components of the hourly care program, and roles andresponsibilities of all CYP Professionals as they relate to implementation of the program. Everyoneshould understand the various roles to ensure that the program runs smoothly. To conduct thistraining, follow these guidelines: • Provide the overview training in a large or small group setting depending on the training plan and schedule in each location. • Require all CYP Professionals to read the Introduction, Hourly Care Guidance, and Roles and Responsibilities sections in the Hourly Care Guidebook prior to the training session. Information in these chapters provides the rationale for the program, guidance on how families can use this service, and an outline of roles and responsibilities by job description. • Review the assigned information with the group. Ask the following questions to encourage discussion: o What questions do you have about the hourly care program? o How do you see hourly care benefiting Navy families? o What are the benefits for currently enrolled children and families? 29
    • Training Tips o Why is it important to establish and maintain a communication system for the hourly care program? o Why is it important to understand everyone’s roles and responsibilities related to hourly care?Remind all CYP Operations Clerks, Program Assistants, and Leads that they are required to attendthe second segment of training, which is specifically designed for their position.1.2 Tailored TrainingTailored training is designed to provide specific training for Operations Clerks, CYP ProgramAssistants, and Leads that is directly related to their duties and the challenges encountered duringimplementation of the hourly care program.Training for CYP Operations ClerksRequire CYP Operation Clerks to review appendices B, C, and D in the guidebook prior to comingto their tailored training session. These appendices are specific to their duties (e.g., ReservationLog, Reservation Checklist, Available Space Tool instructions). To conduct this training, followthese guidelines: • Review the duties of Operation Clerks outlined in the guidebook and clarify any questions. • View the entire video, but focus the discussion primarily on the part of the video related to the roles and responsibilities of the Operations Clerk. • Discuss the content of the video and guidebook using these questions as prompts: o What challenges are you encountering related to use of the Available Space Tool? What strategies can be developed to help meet those challenges? o Is the Reservation Log an effective communiation tool within the program? If not, what would improve communication among CYP Professionals? o What questions are you receiving from parents when they inquire about hourly care? Are you able to answer their questions? If not, what information is needed so that you can more fully respond and meet their needs? o What other challenges are you facing in implementing your responsibilities as the Operations Clerk? What is needed to help you meet those challenges?Encourage Operations Clerks to seek assistance from you or the CYP Director if they havequestions about implementing the hourly care program so issues can be resolved immediately.30
    • Training TipsTraining for CDC Program Assistants and LeadsTraining for CDC Program Assistants and Leads can be provided in a single group session or smallgroups organized by the ages of children served (e.g., infants, pretoddlers and toddlers, andpreschoolers). This training session is an opportunity for CDC Program Assistants and Leads toreview the strategies in the video and guidebook, share their successes and challenges, and receivesupport and additional ideas. To conduct this training, follow these guidelines: • Prior to the session, ask Program Assistants and Leads read the CDC Classroom Strategies chapter and reflect on application of these strategies in their classrooms. • View the entire video, but focus the discussion primarily on the part of the video, which shows the application of the classroom strategies. • Discuss the content of the video and guidebook chapter by using these questions as prompts: o How does the provision of hourly care in the Navy CYP align with NAEYC accreditation standards? o How can the Creative Curriculum® be used to support implementation of hourly care in the classroom? o What is the impact of planning and preparation for hourly care on the hourly care visits? o How can you use the items in your kit to support hourly care? o What challenges are you facing as you implement hourly care with your age group? What do you need to help meet those challenges? o What new strategies have you implemented to facilitate the provision of hourly care? In planning? During the hourly care visit?Remind the CYP Program Assistants and Leads that you will be observing, coaching, and modelingin the classrooms, and that they are required to implement all the strategies presented in theguidebook and video.Training for SAC Program Assistants and LeadsThis training session allows Program Assistants and Leads who work in SAC programsopportunities to review strategies that apply specifically to their program and share successes andchallenges related to implementation of the hourly care program. To conduct this training, followthese guidelines: • Prior to the session, ask CYP Program Assistants and Leads read the SAC Strategies chapter and reflect on application of these strategies in their programs. 31
    • Training Tips • View the entire video, but focus the discussion primarily on the video segment that shows the application of SAC program strategies. • Discuss the content of the video and guidebook chapter by using these questions as prompts: o How does provision of hourly care in the Navy CYP align with COA accreditation standards? o How does having a communication system contribute to the overall success of hourly care visits in the SAC program? o How would you know that a child is having difficulty adjusting to visiting your program? What can you do to assist a child in this situation? o What strategies do you think will be most helpful to you in implementing hourly care?Remind the Program Assistants and Leads that they are required to implement the strategiespresented in the guidebook and video.2. CDC CLASSROOM OBSERVATIONS, COACHING, AND MODELINGTraining is only valuable to CYP Professionals and programs if it translates into competency whenworking with children. The T&C Specialist has a unique role in supporting Program Assistants andLeads in developing these competencies. Observations, coaching, and modeling should be carriedout in all CDC classrooms to ensure implementation of and comfort with the classroom/programstrategies. This follow-up to tailored training sessions offers the T&C Specialist an opportunity towork directly with Program Assistants and Leads on targeted areas that need strengthening.2.1 CDC Classroom ObservationsAs the T&C Specialist, you should observe (a) planning sessions, (b) the classroom environment,and (c) the regularly enrolled children in the CDC program. Use the following checklists as a guidefor these observations.32
    • Training Tips CDC Planning and Preparation ChecklistThe T&C Specialist should use the following checklist as a guide for observations related toplanning sessions, organization of the classroom, and strategies used by CYP Professionals to buildclassroom community prior to hourly care visits.During the weekly planning session, each team should: Create and review the hourly care communication system Plan for the arrival of children throughout the dayTo maintain the environment and materials, Program Assistants should: Create and maintain an hourly care kit Designate a space for the hourly care children’s belongings Refresh the cozy space Create and update the visiting friends board or albumTo build classroom community, Program Assistants and Leads should: Share stories that support the classroom community Talk about visiting friends with the children Refer to the visiting friends board or album Inform the children about visitors as soon as possible Implement a “buddy” system in preschool classrooms CDC Hourly Visit ChecklistThe T&C Specialist should observe in the classroom during arrival of the hourly care family and thetransition of the child into the classroom activities. Return at the end of the visit to observe thedeparture. Use the following checklist as a guide during these observations.When a family arrives in the classroom the CYP Program Assistant should: Review information about hourly care children Warmly welcome children and parents Answer parents’ questionsTo help the hourly child transition, the CYP Program Assistant should: Encourage a positive separation In preschool classrooms, introduce visiting children to their buddy Provide comfort items and/or transition time and space Assist children to engage in an activity with other children Provide additional support at mealtimes and nap 33
    • Training TipsAt departure, the CYP Program Assistant should: Be ready for parents’ arrival Share information about the day Encourage another visit CDC Reflection and Documentation ChecklistAfter the hourly care visit, the T&C Specialist should talk to Program Assistants and Leads toensure that the daily care form was completed.At the end of the visit, the Program Assistants or Leads should: Reflect on each hourly visit Record and file information about the hourly visit.2.2 Coaching and ModelingCompletion of the classroom checklist will identify strategies that are not being implemented at allor those that could be implemented more effectively. Coaching and modeling should be providedrelated to these specific areas of the hourly care program. Coaching can be provided in individualsessions or with a classroom team. A challenging strategy can be modeled to ensure understandingof how it is to be implemented and to provide additional support.The resources in appendix E can be used to reinforce the information detailed in the CDCClassroom strategies chapter and provide additional information related to hourly care issues suchas separation anxiety, building relationships with families, and creating classroom communities.The resources also contain children’s books and CDs.34
    • Appendix AAppendix A: Frequently Asked Questions 35
    • Appendix A Frequently Asked QuestionsQuestion: Does hourly care impact the wait list or the number of spaces needed for childrenwho require full-time care?Answer: No; hourly care does not impact the wait list. Because hourly care children areincorporated into existing classrooms, filling the spaces of children who are enrolled in theprogram but not present on that day, the wait list is not affected. Hourly care does not require adedicated hourly room or dedicated hourly spaces.Question: Since hourly care children are incorporated into the existing CYPs, shouldobservations of those children be conducted at the CDC using Creative Curriculum®?Answer: No, observations are not required for hourly care children. Since the children may notparticipate in the program again, or may not participate on a regular basis, the observations arenot useful. However, it would be useful to keep notes in the child’s file related to strategies thatwere effective in assisting the child during the transition.Question: What constitutes full-time/regular care versus hourly care? (1) What if a familyrequests care 1 hour a day, every day for an indefinite period of time? (2) How should requestsfor care Monday, Wednesday, and Friday every week for an indefinite period be handled? Iseither situation considered hourly care, even though it does not exceed the definition of full-timecare (e.g., 25 hours a week for a CDC)?Answer: If the family schedules the hourly visit in advance and the program can accommodatethe request due to absenteeism or vacancies based on the calculations from the Available SpaceTool, these arrangements can be made. However, parents must understand that the space cannotbe guaranteed indefinitely, and that reservations can only be made 30 days in advance. On aregular basis, CDC parents may not use more than 25 hours of hourly care per child per week.On a regular basis, SAC parents may not use more than 10 hours of hourly care per child perweek during the school year, and no more than 25 hours of hourly care per child per week duringthe summer program. There are situations in which requests for care that exceed the maximumnumber of hours per week should be accommodated. See the Hourly Care Guidance chapter foradditional information.Question: Can families make standing reservations for care (e.g., Tuesday and Thursday ofevery week indefinitely)?Answer: If space is available when a family reserves hourly space (e.g., the program canaccommodate the request due to absenteeism or vacancies based on the calculations from theAvailable Space Tool), the request should be accommodated for the next 30 days. Parents must36
    • Appendix Aunderstand that the space cannot be guaranteed indefinitely and spaces can only be reserved 30days in advance. In other words, standing reservations can be made, but only 30 days in advance.Question: Why can standing reservations be made? It is important to give everyone access tothe program. If a parent books a standing reservation, they are monopolizing the program fortheir own needs and limiting the number of people who can use the program.Answer: Families who make standing reservations are adhering to the hourly care policy.Hourly care is available on a first-come, first-serve basis. If a family calls and makes areservation for care every Tuesday and Thursday for the next 30 days, the intent of the policy isbeing met. Note: the standing reservation can not exceed the 30 day limit.Question: Can families use hourly care, even if they are in the highest fee category and itappears they are using the hourly care program to avoid paying the full enrollment fee?Answer: Yes. Hourly care is available on a first-come, first-serve basis. It is not the role ofCYP Professionals to judge the “merit” of requests for care. Instead, if space is available whenrequested (e.g., the program can accommodate the request due to absenteeism or vacancies basedon the calculations from the Available Space Tool), the reservation should be made. Prioritiesused to place children in full-time care are not used for placement in the hourly program.Question: Does the hourly program require reservations or are walk-ins accepted?Answer: Either is acceptable. Parents can make reservations up to 30 days in advance and theycan also walk in and request care with no advance notice. However, all paperwork must becomplete before an hourly child is accepted, except in emergencies. Parents must understand thatcare might not be available at the time it is requested. The hourly care program does notguarantee that space will be available at the CYP.Question: Why do families need to complete the registration paperwork if their child will onlyparticipate in the CDC or SAC program once?Answer: The registration paperwork provides important information that may help the safetyof the child in an emergency. Because the paperwork contains important information such asmedications being taken and allergies, it helps Navy CYPs better serve children. 37
    • Appendix A38
    • Appendix BAppendix B: Reservation Log 39
    • Appendix B CDC Reservation Log S E C T ION 1: C DC AV AIL AB L E S P A C E T OOL R E S UL T S AND R E S E R V A T IONSInstallation Name Naval Base Anywhere 1Week of 18 May 2009 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Age 2 3 Spaces Reserved Spaces Reserved Spaces Reserved Spaces Reserved Spaces Reserved Infants 1 Pretoddlers 5 Toddlers 1 Preschoolers 2 2 S E C T ION 2: C DC HOUR L Y C AR E R E S E R V AT ION T R AC K ING F OR M Time Care Comments Reserved Parent/ Telephone Child’s Date Care Requested (e.g., special Hourly Room Space or Guardian 5 Child’s Name 6 7 4 Number Age Requested needs, allergies, Assignment Wait List Name Drop off Pick up medication) Reserved Jane Williams 817-555-1234 Russ Williams 3 years 18 May 0930 1700 Allergic to peanuts Reserved James Smith 817-555-7890 Jill Smith 4 years 18 May 0900 1700 NA Wait List Leslie Ronald 817-555-6679 Will Ronald 4 years 18 May 0800 1500 NA1 Create four reservation logs – one for each week in a 30-day period2 Transfer “Total Hourly Care Spaces” numbers from the Available Space Tool to each “Spaces” column3 Once a reservation is made, enter the total number of reserved spaces for that day4 If space is not available, complete Section 2 and enter “Wait List” under the Reserved/Wait List” column5 Record the telephone number at which the parent can be most easily reached on the day of the hourly care visit6 Enter the date parents would like to use care (rather than the date they called to reserve care) under the “Date Care Requested” column7 Enter the hourly room assignment; often this can not be made until the morning of the visit 40
    • Appendix B SAC Reservation Log S E C T ION 1: S AC AV AIL AB L E S P AC E T OOL R E S UL T S AND R E S E R V AT IONSInstallation Name 1Week of Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Program Variation 2 Spaces Reserved Spaces Reserved Spaces Reserved Spaces Reserved Spaces ReservedBefore SchoolAfter SchoolSummer Camp S E C T ION 2: S AC HOUR L Y C AR E R E S E R V AT ION T R AC K ING F OR M Time Care Comments Reserved Parent/ Transportation Telephone Child’s Date Care Requested (e.g., special Space or Guardian 4 Child’s Name 5 Provided by 3 Number Age Requested Drop 6 needs, allergies, Wait List Name Pick up Program? off medication)1 Create four reservation logs – one for each week in a 30-day period2 Transfer “Total Hourly Care Spaces” numbers from the Available Space Tool to each “Spaces” column3 Once a reservation is made, enter the total number of reserved spaces for that day4 If space is not available, complete Section 2 and enter “Wait List” under the Reserved/Wait List” column5 Record the telephone number at which the parent can be most easily reached on the day of the hourly care visit6 Enter the date parents would like to use care (rather than the date they called to reserve care) under the “Date Care Requested” column7 Enter “Yes” or “No” if the program will provide transportation for each child for which care is requested 41
    • Appendix B42
    • Appendix CAppendix C: Reservation Checklist 43
    • Appendix C Reservation ChecklistWhen talking to parents about the hourly care program and taking reservations for hourly care,ensure that the following topics are discussed. Discussion points may vary depending on whetherparents have participated in hourly care at the program in the past. Begin the conversation byasking the question listed under section 1, All Parents.1. ALL PARENTS Ask parents if they have used hourly care at the program before. If no, refer to section 2, First Time Parents. If yes, refer to section 3, Returning Parents.2. FIRST TIME PARENTS Describe the reservation process o Walk-ins are accepted or reservations can be made up to 30 days in advance o Reservations are first-come, first served o On a regular basis, CDC parents may not use more than 25 hours of care per child per week o On a regular basis, SAC parents may not use more than 10 hours of care per child per week during the school year and no more than 25 hours of care per child per week during the summer o Ask SAC parents if their child will need transportation and if so, from what school. Tell parents that transportation will be provided at the SAC program when possible Give parents a welcome packet o Ask for parents’ email addresses so welcome packet materials can be emailed o Discuss the fee agreement included in the welcome packet, including the extension, cancellation, and no-show policy o Tell parents that a list of supplies has been included in the packet (e.g., formula for infants, toothbrush for preschoolers, lunch for SAC children) o Ask parents to review the forms in the welcome packet and call if they have questions o Tell parents to bring the completed paperwork to the first hourly care visit o Explain that care can not be provided until the forms have been completed; note that immunization records are required within 30 days of the first hourly care visit for children at the CDC44
    • Appendix C Encourage parents to visit the program prior to their child’s first hourly care visit o Explain how a tour may assist with their child’s transition to the program by increasing their familiarity with the surroundings o Make arrangements for a tour if the parent is interested Take a reservation o Refer to the Reservation Log to determine the number of spaces available o If space is available, complete the Reservation Log by asking parents for the information listed in Section 2 of the log. It is critical to ask parents the following: ­ If their child has special needs, including allergies ­ If their child will be taking medication during the time of the visit ­ For the phone number where they can be reached during the visit. This number may be different from the emergency contact numbers submitted on the Registration Form3. RETURNING PARENTS Welcome parents and tell them that you are glad that the CYP can serve the family again Ask parents if they have questions about the hourly care program Remind parents of the fee and cancellation policy Refer to the Reservation Log to determine the number of spaces available If space is available, complete the Reservation Log by asking parents for the information listed in Section 2 of the log. It is critical to ask parents the following: ­ If there have been any changes that the program needs to be aware of (e.g., special needs or allergies) ­ If their child will be taking medication during the time of the visit ­ For the phone number where they can be reached during the visit. This number may be different from the emergency contact numbers submitted on the Registration Form Ask parents when they last used the hourly care program. Determine whether any paperwork needs to be updated, particularly if the child has not visited in a while. In particular, verify emergency contact information and confirm that the child’s shot records are up-to-date 45
    • Appendix C46
    • Appendix DAppendix D: Available Space Tool Instructions 47
    • Appendix D CDC Available Space Tool SECTION 1: GENERAL INFORMATION Step 1: Enter installation name.Installation Name Naval Base AnywhereWeek of 18 May 2009 Step 2: Enter date. SECTION 2: INFORMATION BY AGE GROUP INFANTSCapacity 24 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Step 3: Enter totalEnrollment 24 20 24 24 24 capacity for each ageVacancies 0 4 0 0 0 group.Predicted Absentees 1 1 1 1 2Total Hourly Care Spaces 1 5 1 1 2 Step 4: Enter enrollment for each PRETODDLERS day for each ageCapacity 20 group. Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday FridayEnrollment 20 20 19 18 18Vacancies 0 0 1 2 2 Step 5: Print and/orPredicted Absentees 1 1 1 0 0 perform a “Save As”Total Hourly Care Spaces 1 1 2 2 2 to keep a record of hourly care spaces. TODDLERSCapacity 0 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Step 6: Repeat stepsEnrollment 0 0 0 0 0 1 through 5 weeklyVacancies 0 0 0 0 0 so the total numberPredicted Absentees 0 0 0 0 0 of hourly careTotal Hourly Care Spaces 0 0 0 0 0 spaces is based on current enrollment. PRESCHOOLERS Step 7: Transfer theCapacity 32 total number of Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday hourly care spacesEnrollment 31 32 32 32 32 to the CDCVacancies 1 0 0 0 0 Reservation Log.Predicted Absentees 2 2 2 2 3 Use these numbersTotal Hourly Care Spaces 3 2 2 2 3 to take reservations. NOTE: Complete each blue cell. Orange cells will automatically calculate.48
    • Appendix D SAC Available Space Tool Step 1: Enter SECTION 1: GENERAL INFORMATION installation name.Installation Name Naval Base AnywhereWeek of 18 May 2009 Step 2: Enter date. SECTION 2: INFORMATION BY PROGRAM VARIATION BEFORE SCHOOL Step 3: Enter totalTotal Operational Capacity 30 operational capacity Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday for each program type. OperationalEnrollment 25 30 30 30 30 capacity is based onVacancies 5 0 0 0 0 current staffing andPredicted Absentees 2 2 2 3 3 use of space, and isTotal Hourly Care Spaces 7 2 2 3 3 different from facility capacity. AFTER SCHOOLTotal Operational Capacity 60 Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday FridayEnrollment 25 30 30 30 30 Step 4: EnterVacancies 5 0 0 0 0 enrollment for eachPredicted Absentees 2 2 2 3 3 day for eachTotal Hourly Care Spaces 7 2 2 3 3 program variation. SUMMER CAMP Step 5: Print and/or perform a “Save As”Total Operational Capacity 60 to keep a record of Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday hourly care spaces.Enrollment 55 60 60 60 60Vacancies 5 0 0 0 0Predicted Absentees 5 4 5 5 7 Step 6: Repeat stepsTotal Hourly Care Spaces 10 4 5 5 7 1 through 5 weekly so the total number of hourly care NOTE: spaces is based on Complete each blue cell. current enrollment. Orange cells will automatically calculate. Step 7: Transfer the total number of hourly care spaces to the SAC Reservation Log. Use these numbers to take reservations. 49
    • Appendix D50
    • Appendix EAppendix E: Resources 51
    • Appendix E ResourcesResources are listed below to support implementation of the hourly care program. The resourcescan be incorporated into training, used in individual coaching sessions, or used by CYP ProgramAssistants and CYP Leads to enhance their understanding and skills.The resources support the accreditation standards provided by NAEYC and COA andinformation in the Creative Curriculum®.Ages and StagesCarter, M., & Curtis, D. (1991). Time with toddlers: Training for caregivers. [Videorecording]. Seattle,WA: Harvest Resources.Dodge, D. T., Colker, L. J., & Heroman, C. (2002). Chapter 1, How Children Develop and Learn. In The Creative Curriculum for Preschool (4th ed., pp. 102–123). Washington, DC: Teaching Strategies.Dodge, D. T., Rudick, S., Berke, K., (2006). Knowing Infants and Toddlers. In The Creative Curriculum for Infants, Toddlers and Twos. Washington, DC: Teaching Strategies.Hewitt, D. (2002). So this is normal too? Teachers and parents working out developmental issues in young children. St. Paul, MN: Redleaf Press.Lally, J. R., & Butterfield, G. (Producers); Butterfield, G., Lally, J. R., Mangione, P. L., Signer, S., & Gilford, S. (Writers); Gilford, S. (Director). (1992). Discoveries of infancy: Cognitive development and learning [Motion picture]. United States: California Department of Education.Miller, K. (2001). Ages and stages: Developmental descriptions and activities, birth through eight years (Rev. ed.). Beltsville, MD: Telshare Publishing Company.Poole, C., Miller, S. A., & Church, E. B. (September 2005). Ages and stages: How children adjust to school. In Scholastic Early Childhood Today. Retrieved October 31, 2008, from http://www2.scholastic.com/browse/article.jsp?id=3747809&FullBreadCrumb=%3Ca+hr ef%3D%22http%3A%2F%2Fwww2.scholastic.com%2Fbrowse%2Fsearch%2F%3Fquer y%3Dgoodbyes%2Bbook%26Ntt%3Dgoodbyes%2Bbook%26Ntk%3DSCHL30_SI%26 Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchallp.Stephens, K. (2002). Good child care: Tips for toddlers and twos. Child Care Information Exchange, (5), 1–2. Retrieved from http://www.oh-pin.org/articles/pex-02-good-child- care-tips-for.pdf.Wood, Chip. (1997). Yardsticks: Children in the Classroom Ages 4–14. Rev. ed. Greenfield, MA: Northeast Foundation for Children.52
    • Appendix ETransitions and SeparationsBalaban, N. (November 2006). Easing the separation process for infants, toddlers, and families. Young Children on the Web, 1–8. Retrieved from http://journal.naeyc.org/btj/200611/pdf/BTJBalaban.pdf.Balaban, N. (2006). Everyday goodbyes: Starting school and early care, a guide to the separation process. New York: Teacher College Press.Dodge, D. T., Rudick, S., Berke, K., (2006). Hellos and Good-byes. In The Creative Curriculum for Infants, Toddlers and Twos. Washington, DC: Teaching Strategies.Flynn, A. (n.d.). Games to help with good-byes. In Bank Street Corner: Early childhood. Retrieved October 31, 2008, from http://www.bankstreetcorner.com/games_to_help.shtml.Jarvis, K., & Polland, B. (2007). Separation: Supporting children in their preschool transitions. Washington, DC: National Association for the Education of Young Children.Miller, K. (2000, November). Caring for the little ones: Transitional Objects: A Little Comfort From Home Child Care Information Exchange, 67–68. Retrieved from https://secure.ccie.com/library/5013667.pdf.Building a Classroom CommunityBailey, B. A. (2000). I love you rituals. New York: Harper Paperbacks.Bailey, B. (2000) Creating the school family. [Videorecording].Oviedo, Florida: Loving Guidance.Crepeau, I. M., & Richards, M. A. (2003). A show of hands: Using puppets with young children. St. Paul, MN: Redleaf Press.Curtis, D., & Carter, M. (2003). Designs for living and learning: Transforming early childhood environments. St. Paul, MN: Redleaf Press.Dodge, D. T., Colker, L. J., & Heroman, C. (2002). Creating a Classroom Community. In The Creative Curriculum for Preschool (4th ed., pp. 102–123). Washington, DC: Teaching Strategies.Halaby, M. (2000). Belonging: creating community in the classroom. Brookline, MA: Brookline Books. 53 53
    • Appendix EWorking With ParentsCarter, M., & Curtis, D. (2003). Building bridges between teachers and families. [Videorecording]. Seattle, WA: Harvest Resources.Dodge, D. T., Colker, L. J., & Heroman, C. (2002). Communicating with Families. In The Creative Curriculum for Preschool (4th ed., pp. 223–240). Washington, DC: Teaching Strategies.Dodge, D. T., Rudick, S., Berke, K., (2006). Knowing Families. In The Creative Curriculum for Infants, Toddlers and Twos. Washington, DC: Teaching Strategies.Keyser, J. (2006). From parents to partners: Building a family-centered early childhood education program. St. Paul, MN: Redleaf Press.Lally, J. R., & Butterfield, G. (Producers); Butterfield, G., & Signer, S. (Writers); Gilford, S. (Director). (1996). Protective urges: Working with the feelings of parents and caregivers [Motion picture]. United States: California Department of Education.NAEYC. How caring relationships support self-regulation. NAEYC. [Motion picture].Petty, K. (in press). Deployment: Strategies for working with kids in military families. St. Paul, MN: Redleaf Press.Powers, J. (2005). Parent-friendly early learning: Tips and strategies for working well with families. St. Paul, MN: Redleaf Press.Accreditation StandardsCouncil on Accreditation. (2008). After school program standards. Retrieved February 18, 2009 from http://www.coaafterschool.org/standards.phpNational AfterSchool Association. (n.d.). National Afterschool Association. Retrieved February 18, 2009 from www.naaweb.orgNAEYC Early Childhood Program Standards and Accreditation Criteria and Accompanying Guidebooks. (2005). Washington, DC: National Association for the Education of Young Children.Children’s BooksHallinan, P. K. (2006). A Rainbow of Friends. Nashville, TN: Ideals Children’s Books.Henkes, K. (2005). Wemberly Worried. New York: Greenwillow.Hill, E. (2004). Spot goes to school. New York: Putnam Juvenile.54
    • Appendix EIntrater, R. G. (1997). Smile! New York: Cartwheel.Laden, N. (2000). Peek-a Who? San Francisco: Chronicle Books.Laden, N. (2007). Who loves you, baby? San Francisco: Chronicle Books.Macdowell, M., & Hergenrother, M. (2007). Tomorrow is the first day of school. Wading River, NY: Wading River Books.Pando, N., & Voerg, K. (2005). I don’t want to go to school: Helping children cope with separation anxiety. Far Hills, NJ: New Horizon Press.Penn, A. (2007). The kissing hand. Terre Haute, IN: Tanglewood Press.Senderak, C. H., & Nakata, H. (2006). Mommy in my pocket. New York: Hyperion Books for Children.Tompert, A., & Kramer, R. (1992). Will you come back for me? Morton Grove, IL: Albert Whitman and Company.Yolen, J. (2006). How do dinosaurs play with their friends? New York: Blue Sky Press.Zalben, J. B. (2001). Don’t go! Boston: Clarion BooksMusic CDsBailey, B. Songs for I love you rituals (Vol. 1 & 2).Bailey, B. & Hartmann, J. It starts in the heart.Bos, B., Hunter, T. & Leeman, M. Hand in hand.Hartmann, J. Getting better at getting along.Raffi. (1996). Singable songs for the very young: Great with a peanut-butter sandwichPalmer, H. (1996). Peek-a-boo: Songs for young childrenPalmer, H. (1993). A child’s world of lullabies: Multicultural songs for quiet time 55 55
    • Appendix E56
    • Appendix F Appendix F: Daily Forms57 57
    • Appendix F Daily Care Form - Infant Date:Child’s Name: Drop Off Time:Parent’s Name: Pick Up Time: INFORMATION FROM HOME (to be filled out by parent)Before arriving at the center, your child:Drank bottle: ounces Time: Ate solid food: Time:What time will your child be ready for another bottle or meal?Did your child nap today? Yes No If yes, what time and for how long:What time will your child be ready for another nap? For how long:Is your child on medication(s)? Yes No If yes, which medications and why?Will the center administer the medication? Yes NoIf yes, have medication forms been completed? Yes NoAdditional information for the caregivers to know about your child’s daily requirements or routine: DAILY HEALTH CONCERNS (to be filled out by parent)Allergies: Teething: Rashes:Bumps, bruises, or marks:Additional information for the caregivers: INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR CHILD’S DAY (to be filled out by Navy CYP) Meals Diaper Changes Sleeping Schedule Time Formula/Food Oz. Time Wet/Dry/BM Time Asleep/AwakeNotes to parents:For your next visit, be sure to bring: Thank you! We look forward to seeing you again soon!58
    • Appendix F Daily Care Form- Pretoddler Date:Child’s Name: Drop Off Time:Parent’s Name: Pick Up Time: INFORMATION FROM HOME (to be filled out by parent)What time did your child wake up today?Does your child usually nap? Yes No If so, for how long:Has your child had breakfast/lunch? Yes NoIs your child on medication(s)? Yes No If yes, which medications and why?Will the center administer the medication? Yes NoIf yes, have medication forms been completed? Yes NoAdditional information for the caregivers to know about your child’s daily requirements or routine: DAILY HEALTH CONCERNS (to be filled out by parent)Allergies: Teething: Rashes:Bumps, bruises, or marks:Additional information for the caregivers: INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR CHILD’S DAY (to be filled out by Navy CYP)For breakfast I ate: None Some All Comment:For lunch I ate: None Some All Comment:During quite time I: Slept Rested quietly Didn’t feel like resting Diaper Changes W = Wet D = Dry B = Bowel Movement Time Type Time TypeYour child enjoyed the following activities:Overall, your child’s day was: Thank you! We look forward to seeing you again soon! 59 59
    • Appendix F Daily Care Form - Toddler Date:Child’s Name: Drop Off Time:Parent’s Name: Pick Up Time: INFORMATION FROM HOME (to be filled out by parent)What time did your child wake up today?Does your child usually nap? Yes No If yes, for how long:Has your child had breakfast/lunch? Yes NoIs your child on medication(s)? Yes No If yes, which medications and why?Will the center administer the medication? Yes NoIf yes, have medication forms been completed? Yes NoAdditional information for the caregivers to know about your child’s daily requirements or routine: DAILY HEALTH CONCERNS (to be filled out by parent)Allergies: Rashes:Bumps, bruises, or marks:Additional information for the caregivers: INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR CHILD’S DAY (to be filled out by Navy CYP)For breakfast I ate: None Some All Comment:For lunch I ate: None Some All Comment:During quite time I: Slept Rested quietly Didn’t feel like resting Diaper Changes W = Wet D = Dry B = Bowel Movement Time Type Time Type Potty Attempts W = Wet D = Dry B = Bowel Movement Time Type Time TypeYour child enjoyed the following activities:Overall, your child’s day was: Thank you! We look forward to seeing you again soon!60
    • Appendix F Daily Care Form - Preschool Date:Child’s Name: Drop Off Time:Parent’s Name: Pick Up Time: INFORMATION FROM HOME (to be filled out by parent)What time did your child wake up today?Does your child usually nap? Yes No If so, for how long?Has your child had breakfast/lunch? Yes NoIs your child on medication(s)? Yes No If yes, which medications and why?Will the center administer the medication? Yes NoIf yes, have medication forms been completed? Yes NoAdditional Information for the caregivers to know about your child’s daily requirements or routine: DAILY HEALTH CONCERNS (to be filled out by parent)Allergies: Rashes:Bumps, bruises, or marks:Additional information for the caregivers: INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR CHILD’S DAY (to be filled out by Navy CYP)For breakfast I ate: None Some All Comment:For lunch I ate: None Some All Comment:During quite time I: Slept Rested quietly Didn’t feel like restingAttached is a: Photo Work sampleYour child enjoyed the following activities:Overall, your child’s day was: Thank you! We look forward to seeing you again soon! 61 61