Dance-Music Relations<br />
Conceptual<br />Choreographer and composer explore a common theme but perhaps interpret differently owing to differences b...
Rhythmic<br />The dancers’ interest in the music is primarily rhythmic, responding to pulse, and looking for patterns such...
Spatial<br />The music provides an aural space in which to move – as an extension of the physical space. For this, the mus...
Mimicking<br />Dancers respond to the music as a structure of events – or vice-versa<br />E.G. dancers’ gestures mirror th...
Opposition<br />Music and dance are designed not to mirror, but to contradict each others’ states or levels of energy.<br ...
Improvised<br />Music and dance grow together by improvisation and joint experimentation. The future is open and relations...
Chance<br />Choreography and music are designed independently of each other, or by chance operations, in order not to pre-...
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Dance-Music-Relationships

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Dance-Music-Relationships

  1. 1. Dance-Music Relations<br />
  2. 2. Conceptual<br />Choreographer and composer explore a common theme but perhaps interpret differently owing to differences between the two media.<br />
  3. 3. Rhythmic<br />The dancers’ interest in the music is primarily rhythmic, responding to pulse, and looking for patterns such as first beats in the bar, number of beats in a bar etc. Levels of energy in dance and music are probably similar.<br />Models: much world dance/music – African, classical Indian, Latin etc<br />
  4. 4. Spatial<br />The music provides an aural space in which to move – as an extension of the physical space. For this, the music should not be energetic, complex, or feel like an attention-seeking object. Music is usually slow and a-rhythmic.<br />
  5. 5. Mimicking<br />Dancers respond to the music as a structure of events – or vice-versa<br />E.G. dancers’ gestures mirror the music’s phrases<br />E.G. musical events coincide with choreographic ones<br />Model: classical ballet<br />
  6. 6. Opposition<br />Music and dance are designed not to mirror, but to contradict each others’ states or levels of energy.<br />E.G. aggressive music with slow calm gestures<br />E.G. slow, ambient music with energetic choreography<br />This can often achieve tension and intensity. Can be disturbing as music and dance pull in opposite directions.<br />
  7. 7. Improvised<br />Music and dance grow together by improvisation and joint experimentation. The future is open and relations are organic and intimate. <br />The resulting performance may be fixed after developing through constant improvisation – or the performance itself may be improvisational, honed by weeks of experience.<br />
  8. 8. Chance<br />Choreography and music are designed independently of each other, or by chance operations, in order not to pre-judge any relations that may occur.<br />Model: Merce Cunningham & John Cage<br />

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