Designing for the Visually Impaired

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A design concept using Haptics for the visually impaired.

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Designing for the Visually Impaired

  1. 1. DESIGNING FOR THE VISUALLY IMPAIRED<br />ENABLED BY DESIGN<br />
  2. 2. Introduction >><br />WHO?<br />WHAT?<br />WHAT NOT?<br />
  3. 3. Learnabilityfirst time accomplishmentEfficiencyperform quickly<br />Memorability<br />Reestablishing proficiency<br />Our approach >>Biomimicry<br />
  4. 4. “The role of technology is to mirror our humanness. We were born with everything we need:good technology reminds us of that.”<br />Jack Dorsey (@jack), CEO Twitter<br /> Conceptual design >><br />
  5. 5. PLAN<br />ASSISTIVE DEVICE<br />INFORMATION FLOW >><br />
  6. 6. Audio-to-text<br /> Plug-ins for google maps >><br />Tablet Connectivity<br />
  7. 7. Audio registered as text on-cue<br />Given point appears on map<br />
  8. 8. List of Suggested routes can be toggled for change on map<br />
  9. 9. Screen grayed out (inactive)<br />Highlighted select route (active)<br />
  10. 10. DIGITAL IMPRESSION BOARD - HAPTIC PEN<br />The next few slides have used images of Wacom’sIntuos 4 for illustration purposes only** <br />
  11. 11. Digital impression board >><br />Magnet clay/ Magnetized liquid<br />Customizable Button initiators <br />
  12. 12. Digital impression board >><br />Button initiators mapped for similar on-screen functionality <br />Button also serve as cue initiators to commands<br />Electromagnetic waves change texture to imprint the chosen route<br />
  13. 13. << HAPTIC PEN <br />In-built microphone to receive voice commands<br />Finger-tip grip pad for haptic senses<br />Automated nib changer for texture-feel<br />Thumb-button to initiate text-to-speech<br />
  14. 14. << HAPTIC PEN <br />A comic illustration of the tracing of a route using the Haptic pen on texture<br />
  15. 15. What it doesn’t do <br /><ul><li> GPS tracking
  16. 16. Security
  17. 17. Retract ability
  18. 18. Automation
  19. 19. Texture detection </li></ul>What it does <br /><ul><li>Ultrasonic obstacle detection
  20. 20. Vibratory buttons</li></ul> Adding on to the ultra-cane >><br />
  21. 21. Pointing you to the right direction<br />Underside of Haptic torch integrated with GPS /compass<br />Retractability option for non-obtrusiveness<br />Grip transfer force probe to feel texture<br />Handle covered to give *grip* feedback (handholding) <br />
  22. 22. Pointing you to the right direction- navigating without maps<br />Force exerted at points for<br /> ‘pulling’, ‘pushing’ sensation<br />Shoulder and Waist studied to be the turning points in assistive/guided walking<br />Assistive jacket >><br />Automating the Ultra cane<br />
  23. 23. Scenario >> Planning <br />
  24. 24. Scenario >> Assistive device<br />
  25. 25. “ If we want users to like our software, we would design it to behave like a likeable person.”<br />Alan Cooper<br /> Self assessment >><br />
  26. 26.
  27. 27. <ul><li> System status is visible to user
  28. 28. Minimizes the length of process by using natural intuitive memory (long term)
  29. 29. Reduces the time required to do activity by transferring it to natural actions done in life
  30. 30. Supports flexibility in attaining a task
  31. 31. Is mostly automated so system status is not required to be visible to user
  32. 32. Texture probe triggers long-term memory and brings in action
  33. 33. Reduces motor processing time
  34. 34. No flexibility allowed since system is programmed to work in one way alone with no interference.</li></li></ul><li>Future Extensions >><br />Addition of ‘help’ feature without hindering the processing speed of system<br />Backup for when system incurs errors. What happens?<br /> Added flexibility to allow user freedom with his actions.<br />Segregating perception of texture. Muddling to the brain?<br />
  35. 35. ENABLED BY DESIGN<br /> NO QUESTIONS? GOOD.<br />
  36. 36. References<br />

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