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PS 101 Federalism Fall 2013
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PS 101 Federalism Fall 2013

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  • 1. Federalism A system of government under which significant government powers are divided between the central government and smaller governmental units.
  • 2. “The true theory of our Constitution is that the states are independent as to everything within themselves, and united as to everything respecting foreign nations.” ~ Thomas Jefferson
  • 3. Federalism A Key Structural Characteristic of American Government
  • 4. How Federalism is Embodied in the Constitution •Constitution makes central government supreme in certain matters, •BUT makes clear state governments have independent powers. •Supremacy Clause •Article I, Section 8 •Tenth Amendment (Reservation Clause)
  • 5. How Federalism is Embodied in the Constitution •Constitution makes central government supreme in certain matters, •BUT makes clear state governments have independent powers. •Supremacy Clause •Article I, Section 8 •Tenth Amendment (Reservation Clause)
  • 6. VS.
  • 7. How Federalism is Embodied in the Constitution •Constitution makes central government supreme in certain matters, •BUT makes clear state governments have independent powers. •Supremacy Clause •Article I, Section 8 •Tenth Amendment (Reservation Clause)
  • 8. How Federalism is Embodied in the Constitution •Constitution makes central government supreme in certain matters, •BUT makes clear state governments have independent powers. •Supremacy Clause •Article I, Section 8 •Tenth Amendment (Reservation Clause)
  • 9. How Federalism is Embodied in the Constitution •Constitution makes central government supreme in certain matters, •BUT makes clear state governments have independent powers. •Supremacy Clause •Article I, Section 8 •Tenth Amendment (Reservation Clause)
  • 10. Tends to prevent fully unified, disciplined parties
  • 11. Advantages & Disadvantages of Federalism
  • 12. Advantages of Federalism •Diversity of Needs can be met. •Closeness to the people. •Innovation and experimentation.
  • 13. Advantages of Federalism •Diversity of Needs can be met. •Closeness to the people. •Innovation and experimentation.
  • 14. Advantages of Federalism •Diversity of Needs can be met. •Closeness to the people. •Innovation and experimentation.
  • 15. Disadvantages of Federalism •Lack of national standards •Low visibility and lack of popular control •Lack of uniformity in rules and programs
  • 16. Disadvantages of Federalism •Lack of national standards •Low visibility and lack of popular control •Lack of uniformity in rules and programs
  • 17. Disadvantages of Federalism •Lack of national standards •Low visibility and lack of popular control •Lack of uniformity in rules and programs
  • 18. Does Federalism Promote or Hinder Democracy?
  • 19. How Federalism Promotes Democracy •Permits state governments to counterbalance actions of the national government. •Allows people in each state/ community to do what their own majorities prefer.
  • 20. How Federalism Promotes Democracy •Permits state governments to counterbalance actions of the national government. •Allows people in each state/ community to do what their own majorities prefer.
  • 21. How Federalism Hinders Democracy •Responsibility blurred, hard to assign credit or blame. •Democratic processes may not work as well at the state level as at the national level.
  • 22. How Federalism Hinders Democracy •Responsibility blurred, hard to assign credit or blame. •Democratic processes may not work as well at the state level as at the national level.
  • 23. Types of Federalism
  • 24. 3
  • 25. Dual Federalism
  • 26. Limited national power by claiming that states retained certain powers that could not be regulated through national action.
  • 27. “National power STOPS at the state border.”
  • 28. Decline of Dual Federalism
  • 29. Cooperative Federalism
  • 30. Regulation Of Interstate Commerce
  • 31. Doctrine of Incorporation
  • 32. Rise of Fiscal Federalism
  • 33. Creative (Fiscal) Federalism the expenditure of federal funds on programs run in part through state and local governments.
  • 34. Rise of Creative Federalism •Johnson’s Great Society •Increased Federal spending made possible by: –16th Amendment (1913) –Glass-Steagall Act (1932) –Abandonment of the gold standard (Nixon) •Grant-in-Aid
  • 35. Rise of Creative Federalism •Johnson’s Great Society •Increased Federal spending made possible by: –16th Amendment (1913) –Glass-Steagall Act (1932) –Abandonment of the gold standard (Nixon) •Grant-in-Aid
  • 36. Rise of Creative Federalism •Johnson’s Great Society •Increased Federal spending made possible by: –16th Amendment (1913) –Glass-Steagall Act (1932) –Abandonment of the gold standard (Nixon) •Grant-in-Aid
  • 37. Rise of Creative Federalism •Johnson’s Great Society •Increased Federal spending made possible by: –16th Amendment (1913) –Abandonment of the gold standard (Nixon) •Grant-in-Aid
  • 38. Rise of Creative Federalism •Johnson’s Great Society •Increased Federal spending made possible by: –16th Amendment (1913) –Abandonment of the gold standard (Nixon) •Grant-in-Aid
  • 39. 2
  • 40. Categorical Grants
  • 41. Block Grants
  • 42. Recent Trends in Federalism •Devolution •Return of Creative (Fiscal) Federalism