Federalism
A system of government
under which significant
government powers are
divided between the central
government and...
“The true theory of our
Constitution is that the
states are independent as
to everything within
themselves, and united as
...
Federalism
A Key Structural Characteristic of
American Government
How Federalism is Embodied in
the Constitution
•Constitution makes central
government supreme in certain
matters,
•BUT mak...
How Federalism is Embodied in
the Constitution
•Constitution makes central
government supreme in certain
matters,
•BUT mak...
VS.
How Federalism is Embodied in
the Constitution
•Constitution makes central
government supreme in certain
matters,
•BUT mak...
How Federalism is Embodied in
the Constitution
•Constitution makes central
government supreme in certain
matters,
•BUT mak...
How Federalism is Embodied in
the Constitution
•Constitution makes central
government supreme in certain
matters,
•BUT mak...
Tends to prevent fully
unified, disciplined parties
Advantages &
Disadvantages of
Federalism
Advantages of Federalism
•Diversity of Needs can be
met.
•Closeness to the people.
•Innovation and
experimentation.
Advantages of Federalism
•Diversity of Needs can be
met.
•Closeness to the people.
•Innovation and
experimentation.
Advantages of Federalism
•Diversity of Needs can be
met.
•Closeness to the people.
•Innovation and
experimentation.
Disadvantages
of Federalism
•Lack of national standards
•Low visibility and lack of
popular control
•Lack of uniformity in...
Disadvantages
of Federalism
•Lack of national standards
•Low visibility and lack of
popular control
•Lack of uniformity in...
Disadvantages
of Federalism
•Lack of national standards
•Low visibility and lack of
popular control
•Lack of uniformity in...
Does Federalism Promote
or Hinder Democracy?
How Federalism Promotes
Democracy
•Permits state governments to
counterbalance actions of the
national government.
•Allows...
How Federalism Promotes
Democracy
•Permits state governments to
counterbalance actions of the
national government.
•Allows...
How Federalism Hinders
Democracy
•Responsibility blurred, hard to
assign credit or blame.
•Democratic processes may not
wo...
How Federalism Hinders
Democracy
•Responsibility blurred, hard to
assign credit or blame.
•Democratic processes may not
wo...
Types of Federalism
3
Dual Federalism
Limited national power by
claiming that states retained
certain powers that could not
be regulated through
national action.
“National power STOPS at the
state border.”
Decline of
Dual Federalism
Cooperative Federalism
Regulation Of Interstate
Commerce
Doctrine of
Incorporation
Rise of Fiscal Federalism
Creative (Fiscal)
Federalism
the expenditure of federal
funds on programs run in part
through state and local
governments.
Rise of Creative Federalism
•Johnson’s Great Society
•Increased Federal spending
made possible by:
–16th Amendment (1913)
...
Rise of Creative Federalism
•Johnson’s Great Society
•Increased Federal spending
made possible by:
–16th Amendment (1913)
...
Rise of Creative Federalism
•Johnson’s Great Society
•Increased Federal spending
made possible by:
–16th Amendment (1913)
...
Rise of Creative Federalism
•Johnson’s Great Society
•Increased Federal spending
made possible by:
–16th Amendment (1913)
...
Rise of Creative Federalism
•Johnson’s Great Society
•Increased Federal spending
made possible by:
–16th Amendment (1913)
...
2
Categorical Grants
Block Grants
Recent Trends in Federalism
•Devolution
•Return of Creative (Fiscal) Federalism
PS 101 Federalism Fall 2013
PS 101 Federalism Fall 2013
PS 101 Federalism Fall 2013
PS 101 Federalism Fall 2013
PS 101 Federalism Fall 2013
PS 101 Federalism Fall 2013
PS 101 Federalism Fall 2013
PS 101 Federalism Fall 2013
PS 101 Federalism Fall 2013
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PS 101 Federalism Fall 2013

  1. 1. Federalism A system of government under which significant government powers are divided between the central government and smaller governmental units.
  2. 2. “The true theory of our Constitution is that the states are independent as to everything within themselves, and united as to everything respecting foreign nations.” ~ Thomas Jefferson
  3. 3. Federalism A Key Structural Characteristic of American Government
  4. 4. How Federalism is Embodied in the Constitution •Constitution makes central government supreme in certain matters, •BUT makes clear state governments have independent powers. •Supremacy Clause •Article I, Section 8 •Tenth Amendment (Reservation Clause)
  5. 5. How Federalism is Embodied in the Constitution •Constitution makes central government supreme in certain matters, •BUT makes clear state governments have independent powers. •Supremacy Clause •Article I, Section 8 •Tenth Amendment (Reservation Clause)
  6. 6. VS.
  7. 7. How Federalism is Embodied in the Constitution •Constitution makes central government supreme in certain matters, •BUT makes clear state governments have independent powers. •Supremacy Clause •Article I, Section 8 •Tenth Amendment (Reservation Clause)
  8. 8. How Federalism is Embodied in the Constitution •Constitution makes central government supreme in certain matters, •BUT makes clear state governments have independent powers. •Supremacy Clause •Article I, Section 8 •Tenth Amendment (Reservation Clause)
  9. 9. How Federalism is Embodied in the Constitution •Constitution makes central government supreme in certain matters, •BUT makes clear state governments have independent powers. •Supremacy Clause •Article I, Section 8 •Tenth Amendment (Reservation Clause)
  10. 10. Tends to prevent fully unified, disciplined parties
  11. 11. Advantages & Disadvantages of Federalism
  12. 12. Advantages of Federalism •Diversity of Needs can be met. •Closeness to the people. •Innovation and experimentation.
  13. 13. Advantages of Federalism •Diversity of Needs can be met. •Closeness to the people. •Innovation and experimentation.
  14. 14. Advantages of Federalism •Diversity of Needs can be met. •Closeness to the people. •Innovation and experimentation.
  15. 15. Disadvantages of Federalism •Lack of national standards •Low visibility and lack of popular control •Lack of uniformity in rules and programs
  16. 16. Disadvantages of Federalism •Lack of national standards •Low visibility and lack of popular control •Lack of uniformity in rules and programs
  17. 17. Disadvantages of Federalism •Lack of national standards •Low visibility and lack of popular control •Lack of uniformity in rules and programs
  18. 18. Does Federalism Promote or Hinder Democracy?
  19. 19. How Federalism Promotes Democracy •Permits state governments to counterbalance actions of the national government. •Allows people in each state/ community to do what their own majorities prefer.
  20. 20. How Federalism Promotes Democracy •Permits state governments to counterbalance actions of the national government. •Allows people in each state/ community to do what their own majorities prefer.
  21. 21. How Federalism Hinders Democracy •Responsibility blurred, hard to assign credit or blame. •Democratic processes may not work as well at the state level as at the national level.
  22. 22. How Federalism Hinders Democracy •Responsibility blurred, hard to assign credit or blame. •Democratic processes may not work as well at the state level as at the national level.
  23. 23. Types of Federalism
  24. 24. 3
  25. 25. Dual Federalism
  26. 26. Limited national power by claiming that states retained certain powers that could not be regulated through national action.
  27. 27. “National power STOPS at the state border.”
  28. 28. Decline of Dual Federalism
  29. 29. Cooperative Federalism
  30. 30. Regulation Of Interstate Commerce
  31. 31. Doctrine of Incorporation
  32. 32. Rise of Fiscal Federalism
  33. 33. Creative (Fiscal) Federalism the expenditure of federal funds on programs run in part through state and local governments.
  34. 34. Rise of Creative Federalism •Johnson’s Great Society •Increased Federal spending made possible by: –16th Amendment (1913) –Glass-Steagall Act (1932) –Abandonment of the gold standard (Nixon) •Grant-in-Aid
  35. 35. Rise of Creative Federalism •Johnson’s Great Society •Increased Federal spending made possible by: –16th Amendment (1913) –Glass-Steagall Act (1932) –Abandonment of the gold standard (Nixon) •Grant-in-Aid
  36. 36. Rise of Creative Federalism •Johnson’s Great Society •Increased Federal spending made possible by: –16th Amendment (1913) –Glass-Steagall Act (1932) –Abandonment of the gold standard (Nixon) •Grant-in-Aid
  37. 37. Rise of Creative Federalism •Johnson’s Great Society •Increased Federal spending made possible by: –16th Amendment (1913) –Abandonment of the gold standard (Nixon) •Grant-in-Aid
  38. 38. Rise of Creative Federalism •Johnson’s Great Society •Increased Federal spending made possible by: –16th Amendment (1913) –Abandonment of the gold standard (Nixon) •Grant-in-Aid
  39. 39. 2
  40. 40. Categorical Grants
  41. 41. Block Grants
  42. 42. Recent Trends in Federalism •Devolution •Return of Creative (Fiscal) Federalism

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