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Marxism (Part 1)

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First half of a slideshow prepared for a series of lectures on Marxism for PS 240 Introduction to Political Theory at the University of Kentucky, Fall 2007. Dr. Christopher S. Rice, Lecturer.

First half of a slideshow prepared for a series of lectures on Marxism for PS 240 Introduction to Political Theory at the University of Kentucky, Fall 2007. Dr. Christopher S. Rice, Lecturer.

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    Marxism (Part 1) Marxism (Part 1) Presentation Transcript

    • Marxism (Part One) Dr. Christopher S. Rice
    •  
    • The Early Marx
    • Marx Becomes A Philosopher
    • 2 effects of his career in Journalism
    • He came to appreciate the central social and political importance of economics
    • He ceased to be a liberal and became a radical
    •  
    • The Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts of 1844
    • Hegel and his influence on Marxism
    • Hegel’s Philosophy of History
    • Geist
    • Alienation ( entfremdung )
    • Dialectic the process whereby opposite views or forces come into conflict, which eventually leads to the overcoming or reconciliation of the opposition in a new and presumably higher form
    • The Master-Slave Dialectic
      • The master becomes master by physically conquering another, whom he then enslaves.
      • Seeing oneself through the eyes of the Other.
      • The master and slave are engaged in a symbiotic relationship.
      • The master and slave are engaged in a conflictual relationship.
      • The true relationship revealed through resistance.
      • A Happy Conclusion…
    • The Master-Slave Dialectic
      • The master becomes master by physically conquering another, whom he then enslaves.
      • Seeing oneself through the eyes of the Other.
      • The master and slave are engaged in a symbiotic relationship.
      • The master and slave are engaged in a conflictual relationship.
      • The true relationship revealed through resistance.
      • A Happy Conclusion…
    • The Master-Slave Dialectic
      • The master becomes master by physically conquering another, whom he then enslaves.
      • Seeing oneself through the eyes of the Other.
      • The master and slave are engaged in a symbiotic relationship.
      • The master and slave are engaged in a conflictual relationship.
      • The true relationship revealed through resistance.
      • A Happy Conclusion…
    • The Master-Slave Dialectic
      • The master becomes master by physically conquering another, whom he then enslaves.
      • Seeing oneself through the eyes of the Other.
      • The master and slave are engaged in a symbiotic relationship.
      • The master and slave are engaged in a conflictual relationship.
      • The true relationship revealed through resistance.
      • A Happy Conclusion…
    • The Master-Slave Dialectic
      • The master becomes master by physically conquering another, whom he then enslaves.
      • Seeing oneself through the eyes of the Other.
      • The master and slave are engaged in a symbiotic relationship.
      • The master and slave are engaged in a conflictual relationship.
      • The true relationship revealed through resistance.
      • A Happy Conclusion…
    • The Master-Slave Dialectic
      • The master becomes master by physically conquering another, whom he then enslaves.
      • Seeing oneself through the eyes of the Other.
      • The master and slave are engaged in a symbiotic relationship.
      • The master and slave are engaged in a conflictual relationship.
      • The true relationship revealed through resistance.
      • A Happy Conclusion…
    • History as the Story of Human Labor and Struggle
    • “ The history of all hitherto existing society is the history of class struggles .”
    • Materialist vs. Idealist
    • Material Forces of Production + Social Relations of Production = Material Production
    • Material Forces of Production
    • Social Relations of Production
    • The Dialectic of Class
    • Class determined by relation to the forces of production
    • Dominating Class has 2 important advantages:
      • Monopoly on the power, agents of coercion
      • Control of the Mental Means of Production
    • Dominating Class has 2 important advantages:
      • Monopoly on the power, agents of coercion
      • Control of the Mental Means of Production
    • False Consciousness
    • Base & Superstructure
    • Marx’s Materialist Conception of Society (Ball and Dagger, “Socialism and Communism: More to Marx”) IDEOLOGICAL SUPERSTRUCTURE BASE IDEAS, IDEALS, BELIEFS (Morality, Law, Religion, Etc.) SOCIAL RELATIONS OF PRODUCTION MATERIAL FORCES OF PRODUCTION (“Productive Forces”)
    • “ Religion is the opiate of the masses”
    • Possessive Individualism
    • Marx’s Critique of Capitalism
    • “ The bourgeoisie, historically, has played a most revolutionary part.”
    • Capitalism’s 3 important progressive functions
      • Merchant capitalists hastened the demise of feudalism
      • Capitalism has made men masters over nature
      • Capitalism requires constant innovation and change
      • Merchant capitalists hastened the demise of feudalism
      • Capitalism has made men masters over nature
      • Capitalism requires constant innovation and change
      • Merchant capitalists hastened the demise of feudalism
      • Capitalism has made men masters over nature
      • Capitalism requires constant innovation and change
    • So why should Capitalism be replaced???
    • 3 Reasons
    • Capitalism is Outmoded
    • Capitalism creates Alienation
    • 4 ways in which workers are alienated under capitalism:
      • They are alienated from the product of their labor because they are forced to sell their labor and do not own what they produce.
      • They are alienated from the activity of production itself because the capitalist system of mass production kills the creative spirit, leaving workers unable to find satisfaction in their labor.
      • Workers are alienated from their unique and distinctively human nature and potential, particularly the power to create and enjoy beauty, by the dulling effect of living in a capitalist society.
      • Capitalism alienates workers from each other because it forces them to compete of jobs and wages.
    • 4 ways in which workers are alienated under capitalism:
      • They are alienated from the product of their labor because they are forced to sell their labor and do not own what they produce.
      • They are alienated from the activity of production itself because the capitalist system of mass production kills the creative spirit, leaving workers unable to find satisfaction in their labor.
      • Workers are alienated from their unique and distinctively human nature and potential, particularly the power to create and enjoy beauty, by the dulling effect of living in a capitalist society.
      • Capitalism alienates workers from each other because it forces them to compete of jobs and wages.
    • 4 ways in which workers are alienated under capitalism:
      • They are alienated from the product of their labor because they are forced to sell their labor and do not own what they produce.
      • They are alienated from the activity of production itself because the capitalist system of mass production kills the creative spirit, leaving workers unable to find satisfaction in their labor.
      • Workers are alienated from their unique and distinctively human nature and potential, particularly the power to create and enjoy beauty, by the dulling effect of living in a capitalist society.
      • Capitalism alienates workers from each other because it forces them to compete of jobs and wages.
    • 4 ways in which workers are alienated under capitalism:
      • They are alienated from the product of their labor because they are forced to sell their labor and do not own what they produce.
      • They are alienated from the activity of production itself because the capitalist system of mass production kills the creative spirit, leaving workers unable to find satisfaction in their labor.
      • Workers are alienated from their unique and distinctively human nature and potential, particularly the power to create and enjoy beauty, by the dulling effect of living in a capitalist society.
      • Capitalism alienates workers from each other because it forces them to compete of jobs and wages.
    • Capitalism is Self-subverting
    • Why capitalism is DOOOOOOOMED!
    • Capitalism contains within itself the seeds of its own destruction
    • Capitalism has created its own “grave-diggers” by creating a class with interests diametrically opposed to its own, brought them together & taught them how to cooperate
    • Thus, they become a unified class, which has common interests and a common enemy, the bourgeoisie
    • The proletariat then comes to realize that it is a class with nothing to lose but everything to gain by revolting against and overthrowing the bourgeoisie
    • Bourgeois-Proletariat Dialectic
      • The Worker is enslaved by the Capitalist, though at first, he or she does not know it
      • The Worker wakes from a “False Consciousness”
      • The Dialectic turns…
      • Establishing the classless society
    •  
    • Bourgeois-Proletariat Dialectic
      • The Worker is enslaved by the Capitalist, though at first, he or she does not know it
      • The Worker wakes from a “False Consciousness”
      • The Dialectic turns…
      • Establishing the classless society
    • Bourgeois-Proletariat Dialectic
      • The Worker is enslaved by the Capitalist, though at first, he or she does not know it
      • The Worker wakes from a “False Consciousness”
      • The Dialectic turns…
      • Establishing the classless society
    • Bourgeois-Proletariat Dialectic
      • The Worker is enslaved by the Capitalist, though at first, he or she does not know it
      • The Worker wakes from a “False Consciousness”
      • The Dialectic turns…
      • Establishing the classless society
    • The Revolutionary Sequence COMMUNISM WITHERING AWAY OF THE STATE DICTATORSHIP OF THE PROLETARIAT SEIZURE OF STATE POWER REVOLUTIONARY CLASS CONSCIOUSNESS IMMISERATION OF THE PROLETARIAT ECONOMIC CRISES
    • The Marxist View of Freedom (Ball and Dagger, “Socialism and Communism: More to Marx”) OBSTACLE: Class divisions, economic inequalities, unequal life chances, “False Consciousness" AGENT: Common/ Working People; The proletariat GOAL: Fulfillment of human potential and needs