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A WordPress presentation from WordCampDev Toronto 2012

A WordPress presentation from WordCampDev Toronto 2012

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  • 1. How to create aWordPress plugin.WordCamp Toronto Dev 2012@thisismyurl
  • 2. What is a Plugin?A WordPress plugin is a PHP based addition to theWordPress blogging platform.• Plugins are functions which interact with WordPress Core code;• A Plugin changes what WordPress does;• Plugins are stored external of the theme;
  • 3. What can they do?Since Plugins are executed as part of the WordPress platform,they’re almost limitless.• Plugins can interact with WordPress via Hooks and Actions;• They can create, or interact with API’s in the WordPress system;• Plugins can affect Posts, Pages, Users, or any part of the WordPress tool;
  • 4. When should you use aPlugin?Plugin functions can be stored as a plugin, or in a themefunction.php file, why choose?• Functions are specifically part of the theme;• Plugins allow you to share code outside a theme, across multiple designs;• Plugins can be activated in multisite environments;
  • 5. Theme functions arerestricted to a singletheme. Plugins deliver the same code to multiple blogs, on the same server or across multiple hosting accounts.
  • 6. How WordPress finds aPluginWordPress will automatically locate plugins on a standardinstall, adding them to the admin• /wp-content/plugins/filename.php• /wp-content/plugins/folder-name/filename.php• WordPress will search one level deep in the plugins folder;• Searches for .php files with a valid plugin header;
  • 7. Plugin header
  • 8. Plugin header
  • 9. Complete Plugin
  • 10. Play nice with otherfunctionsRemember WordPress shares your plugin functions across theentire site, be unique• Your plugins should use a unique name for all functions;• function demo_plugin_function_name() for example;• Plugin file load order is determined by WordPress;
  • 11. What are Actions?Actions are triggered by WordPress, causing your plugin tospring to life.• There’s an action for almost everything WordPress does• http://codex.wordpress.org/Plugin_API/Action_Reference
  • 12. What are Filters?Filters allow you to change content WordPresshas created.• There’s an filter for almost everything WordPress does• http://codex.wordpress.org/Plugin_API
  • 13. Building a PluginLet’s get started with something basic.
  • 14. A standard WordPress function
  • 15. A standard WordPress plugin
  • 16. Adding a link items to the Plugins page list
  • 17. Adding an item to the Settings menu
  • 18. Creating a settings page
  • 19. Adding items to the settings page
  • 20. Defining the settings page
  • 21. Defining the default values
  • 22. Showing the values
  • 23. A standard WordPress function
  • 24. A standard WordPress function, calling settings
  • 25. Adding a Shortcode
  • 26. The entire pluginhttp://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/fetch-twitter-count-for-wordpress/
  • 27. How to uninstall the data from your plugin• Stored separately in an uninstall.php file.
  • 28. Plugin Best PractisesSome ideas on how to do it right.
  • 29. Be unique.Remember Plugins interact will all the code on yourWordPress website, make sure you’re unique.• Classes and Functions should use unique names;• thisismyurl_plugin_name_function_name() for example;
  • 30. Be descriptive.Your Plugin is part of something else, make sure people caneasily understand your code.• Elements should use verbose naming conventions, easy to understand;• $i is bad;• $loop_resume_posts is good;
  • 31. Be consistent.There are standards in the WordPress community, followingthem makes it easy.• The WordPress coding standards make coding easier in the long run;• If you’re following your own coding standards, stick to them;• http://codex.wordpress.org/WordPress_Coding_Standards
  • 32. Be lazy, but smart.In my experience, somebody else has already done a lot of theheavy lifting so look before you code.
  • 33. Contributing a Plugin.How to help.
  • 34. Be respectful.Some authors like to work on their plugins alone. If you’dlike to help, ask.
  • 35. Fork it.All plugins on WordPress.org are released under the GNUlicensing terms, if you can’t collaborate, innovate.
  • 36. Give Back.If you’ve written a WordPress Plugin that you think thecommunity will benefit from, submit it to WordPress.org forreview and consideration.
  • 37. @thisismyurlChristopher Ross (info@thisismyurl.com)