4-CMMI Process Area Components

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4-CMMI Process Area Components

  1. 1. Process Area Components
  2. 2. Structure of CMMI models <ul><li>The basic building blocks in every CMMI model are called “ process areas ” </li></ul><ul><li>A process area (PA) describes what those using an effective process do (practices) and why they do those things (goals). </li></ul>
  3. 3. PA Components <ul><li>Required. </li></ul><ul><li>Expected. </li></ul><ul><li>Informative. </li></ul>
  4. 4. CMMI Model components
  5. 5. Required Components <ul><li>Required components describe what an organization must achieve to satisfy a process area. </li></ul><ul><li>The required components in CMMI are the specific and generic goals. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Expected Components <ul><li>Expected components describe what an organization may implement to achieve a required component. </li></ul><ul><li>Expected components include the specific and generic practices. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Informative Components <ul><li>Informative components provide details that help organizations get started in thinking about how to approach the required and expected components . </li></ul><ul><li>Subpractices, typical work products, amplifications, generic practice elaborations, goal and practice titles, goal and practice notes, and references are examples of informative model components. </li></ul>
  8. 8. CMMI Model components
  9. 9. Model components Generic Practice Elaborations Generic Goals Typical Work Products Specific Goal and Practice Summaries Generic Practices Specific Goals Subpractices Related Process Areas Specific Practices Introductory Notes Subpractices Purpose Statements Specific Practices Process Areas
  10. 10. Process Areas <ul><li>A process area is a cluster of related practices in an area that, when implemented collectively, satisfy a set of goals considered important for making improvement in that area. </li></ul><ul><li>There are 22 process areas </li></ul>
  11. 11. Process Areas (cont.) <ul><li>Causal Analysis and Resolution (CAR) </li></ul><ul><li>Configuration Management (CM) </li></ul><ul><li>Decision Analysis and Resolution (DAR) </li></ul><ul><li>Integrated Project Management +IPPD (IPM+IPPD) </li></ul><ul><li>Measurement and Analysis (MA) </li></ul><ul><li>Organizational Innovation and Deployment (OID) </li></ul><ul><li>Organizational Process Definition +IPPD (OPD+IPPD)6 </li></ul><ul><li>Organizational Process Focus (OPF) </li></ul><ul><li>Organizational Process Performance (OPP) </li></ul><ul><li>Organizational Training (OT) </li></ul><ul><li>Product Integration (PI) </li></ul><ul><li>…… .. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Process Areas (cont.) <ul><li>Project Monitoring and Control (PMC) </li></ul><ul><li>Project Planning (PP) </li></ul><ul><li>Process and Product Quality Assurance (PPQA) </li></ul><ul><li>Quantitative Project Management (QPM) </li></ul><ul><li>Requirements Development (RD) </li></ul><ul><li>Requirements Management (REQM) </li></ul><ul><li>Risk Management (RSKM) </li></ul><ul><li>Supplier Agreement Management (SAM) </li></ul><ul><li>Technical Solution (TS) </li></ul><ul><li>Validation (VAL) </li></ul><ul><li>Verification (VER) </li></ul>
  13. 13. Purpose Statements
  14. 14. Purpose Statements <ul><li>The purpose statement describes the purpose of the process area and is an informative component. </li></ul>
  15. 15. Introductory Notes
  16. 16. Introductory Notes <ul><li>The introductory notes section of the process area describes the major concepts covered in the process area and is an informative component. </li></ul>
  17. 17. Related Process Areas
  18. 18. Related Process Areas <ul><li>The related process areas section lists references to related process areas and reflects the high-level relationships among the process areas. The related process area section is an informative component. </li></ul>
  19. 19. Specific Goals
  20. 20. Specific Goals <ul><li>A specific goal describes the unique characteristics that must be present to satisfy the process area. </li></ul><ul><li>A specific goal is a required model component and is used in appraisals to help determine whether a process area is satisfied. </li></ul>
  21. 21. Generic Goals
  22. 22. Generic Goals <ul><li>Generic goals are called “generic” because the same goal statement applies to multiple process areas. </li></ul><ul><li>A generic goal describes the characteristics that must be present to institutionalize the processes that implement a process area. </li></ul><ul><li>A generic goal is a required model component and is used in appraisals to determine whether a process area is satisfied </li></ul>
  23. 23. Specific Goal and Practice Summaries <ul><li>The specific goal and practice summary provides a high-level summary of the specific goals , which are required components, and the specific practices, which are expected components. </li></ul><ul><li>The specific goal and practice summary is an informative component. </li></ul>
  24. 24. Specific Practices
  25. 25. Specific Practices <ul><li>A specific practice is the description of an activity that is considered important in achieving the associated specific goal. </li></ul><ul><li>The specific practices describe the activities that are expected to result in achievement of the specific goals of a process area. </li></ul><ul><li>A specific practice is an expected model component. </li></ul>
  26. 26. Subpractices
  27. 27. Subpractices <ul><li>A subpractice is a detailed description that provides guidance for interpreting and implementing a specific or generic practice. </li></ul><ul><li>Subpractices are actually an informative component meant only to provide ideas that may be useful for process improvement. </li></ul>
  28. 28. Generic Practices
  29. 29. Generic Practices <ul><li>Generic practices are called “generic” because the same practice applies to multiple process areas. </li></ul><ul><li>A generic practice is the description of an activity that is considered important in achieving the associated generic goal. </li></ul><ul><li>A generic practice is an expected model component. </li></ul>
  30. 30. Generic Practice Elaborations
  31. 31. Generic Practice Elaborations <ul><li>A generic practice elaboration appears after a generic practice in a process area to provide guidance on how the generic practice should be applied uniquely to the process area. </li></ul><ul><li>A generic practice elaboration is an informative model component. </li></ul>
  32. 32. Typical Work Products
  33. 33. Typical Work Products <ul><li>The typical work products section lists sample output from a specific practice. </li></ul><ul><li>These examples are called typical work products because there are often other work products that are just as effective but are not listed. </li></ul><ul><li>A typical work product is an informative model component. </li></ul>
  34. 34. Supporting Informative Components <ul><li>In many places, further information is needed to describe a concept. This informative material is provided in the form of the following components: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Notes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Examples </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Amplifications </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>References </li></ul></ul>
  35. 35. Notes <ul><li>A note is text that can accompany nearly any other model component. </li></ul><ul><li>It may provide detail, background, or rationale. </li></ul><ul><li>A note is an informative model component. </li></ul>
  36. 36. Examples <ul><li>An example is a component comprising text and often a list of items , usually in a box, that can accompany nearly any other component and provides one or more examples to clarify a concept or described activity. </li></ul><ul><li>An example is an informative model component. </li></ul>
  37. 37. Amplifications <ul><li>An amplification is a note or example that is relevant to a particular discipline . (hardware engineering, systems engineering, and software engineering) </li></ul><ul><li>An amplification is an informative model component. </li></ul>
  38. 38. References <ul><li>A reference is a pointer to additional or more detailed information in related process areas and can accompany nearly any other model component. </li></ul><ul><li>A reference is an informative model component. </li></ul>
  39. 39. Numbering Scheme <ul><li>Specific and generic goals are numbered sequentially. </li></ul><ul><li>Each specific goal begins with the prefix SG (e.g., SG 1). </li></ul><ul><li>Each generic goal begins with the prefix GG (e.g., GG 2). </li></ul>
  40. 40. Numbering Scheme <ul><li>Each specific practice begins with the prefix SP, followed by a number in the form x.y </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(e.g., SP 1.1). </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The x is the same number as the goal to which the specific practice maps. </li></ul><ul><li>The y is the sequence number of the specific practice under the specific goal. </li></ul>

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