Close Reading Starters
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Close Reading Starters

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    Close Reading Starters Close Reading Starters Presentation Transcript

    •  
      • High Dive by James Kirkup
      •  
      • Walk to the brink, turn and carefully
      • (firm toes gripping this last hold on life)
      • hang heels in pace. Face a blank wall.
      •  
      • Raise arms slowly sideways, shoulder-high,
      • silent passion, dream - deep concentration
      • foretelling every second of the coming flight.
      •  
      • Then with a sudden upward beat of palms,
      • of arms like wings, gathering more than thought
      • launch backwards into take-off, into one ball
      •  
      • roll for a quadruple reverse somersault
      • that at the last split second flicks
      • open like a switchblade –
      •  
      • feet pointed as in prayer, neat-folded hands
      • stab the heavens like a dagger,
      • plunge deep into the pool’s azure flesh - without a splash.
      •  
      •  
      Questions 1.Quote two words from the poem that compare the character to a bird. 2.In your own words, write down how many reverse somersaults the character makes. 3.Give two examples of simile from this poem. 4.What is another word that means the same as brink (line 4)? 5.Why doesn’t the character make a splash? 6.What are the thousand upturned faces (lines 2-3) looking at? 7. I s this poem written in the past, the present or the future?
    • Answers
      • 1. Quote two words from the poem that compare the character to a bird.
      •  
      • … like wings
      •  
      • 2. In your own words, write down how many reverse somersaults the character makes.
      •  
      • Four   
      •  
      • 3. Give two examples of simile from this poem.
      •  
      • Any TWO of:
      • … arms like wings
      • … flicks open like a switchblade
      • … stab the heavens like a dagger
      •  
      •  
      • 4. What is another word that means the same as brink (line 4)?
      •  
      • edge/lip/verge/threshold/rim
      •  
      • 5. Why doesn’t the character make a splash?
      •  
      • Because they have their hands/arms above there head and enter ‘like a dagger’ so they ‘slide/slip’ into the water.
      •  
      •  
      • 6. What are the thousand upturned faces (lines 2-3) looking at?
      •  
      • The diver on the diveboard.
      •  
      •  
      • 7. Is this poem written in the past, the present or the future? What is the effect of this?
      •  
      • Present: makes the audience feel like they are there.
      • FROGS by Norman MacCraig
      • Frogs sit more solid
      • Than anything sits. In mid-leap they are
      • Parachutists falling
      • In a free fall. They die on roads
      • With arms across their chests
      • Heads high.
      •  
      • I love frogs that sit
      • Like Buddha. That fall without
      • Parachutes. That die,
      • like Italian tenors.
      •  
      • Above all, I like them because,
      • Pursued in water, they never
      • Panic so much that they fail
      • To make stylish triangles
      • With their ballet dancer’s
      • Legs.
      •  
      •  
      1. Locate one example of each of the poetic devices listed below.   a. metaphor: b. alliteration: c. simile: d. personification:
    • Answers
      • 1. Locate one example of each of the poetic devices listed below.
      •  
      • a. metaphor: Parachutists falling …
      • … ballet dancers legs …
      •  
      • b. alliteration: … sit more solid than anything sits.
      • … falling in a free fall.
      • … arms across …
      • Heads high.
      • Above all …
      • Pursued in water, they never panic
      • c. simile: … sit like Buddha.
      • … die like Italian tenors.
      •  
      • d. personification: … arms across their chests …
      • … stylish …
      • … dancing …
      • Town Ghost
      •  
      • After the rain
      • came the town ghost
      • eyes like street lamps
      • yellow sulphurous
      • fists big boulders
      • coat black in the wind
      • strode past the wharves
      • round into Cable Street
      • shoved aside specters
      • warehouse porters
      • flower auctioneers
      • aching with injury
      • silently bawling
      • when I came up
      • spat on the asphalt
      • Look lady just don’t
      • You interfere.
      •  
      • by Lauris Edmond
      Questions   1. Identify and underline one example of each of the following: a. a simile b. a metaphor c. alliteration   2. Explain why the last two lines are written in italics.   3. Describe the feeling of the poem and quote one word to support this.
    • Answers
      • 1. Identify and underline one example of each of the following:
      • Simile eyes like street lamps (lines 3 and 4)
      • Metaphor yellow sulphurous fists big boulders (lines 4 and 5)
      • Alliteration street … sulphurous (lines 2 and 3)
      • Big boulders coat black (lines 5 and 6)
      • Wind … wharves (lines 6 and 7)
      • Shoved aside specters (line 9)
      •  
      • 2. Explain why the last two lines are written in italics.
      •  
      • Because it is someone speaking while the rest of the poem has been a description.
      • Because it is the voice of the town ghost.
      •  
      •  
      •  
      •  
      • 3. Describe the feeling of the poem and quote one word to support this.
      •  
      • Angry: fists/black/strode/shoved aside/Look lady …
      • Upset: aching/bawling
      •  
    • 1.‘Repose’ means a. clouds b. going backwards c. resting 2.‘As thick as rain’ is an example of a. metaphor b. simile c. alliteration 3.The sun’s ‘golden fingers’ is an example of a. metaphor b. alliteration c. personification 4.‘Spider-clad’ means a. the spiders have dresses on b. there are lots of cobwebs c. there are no spiders 5.The ‘hayloft’ is a. where you keep hay b. where you keep ladders c. decorated with ladders
      • Summer Sun by Robert Louis Stevenson
      •  
      • Great is the sun and wide he goes
      • Through empty heaven without repose;
      • And in the blue and glowing days
      • As thick as rain he showers his rays.
      • Though closer still the blinds we pull
      • To keep the shady parlour cool,
      • Yet he will find a chink or two
      • To slip his golden finger through
      • The dusty attic spider-clad
      • He, through the keyhole, maketh glad;
      • And through the broken edge of tiles
      • Into the laddered hayloft smiles
      • Meantime his golden face around
      • He bares to all the golden ground,
      • And sheds a warm and glittering look
      • Among the ivy’s inmost nook.
      • Above the hills, along the blue,
      • Round the bright air with footing true
      • To please the child, to paint the rose
      • The gardener of the World, he goes.
      •  
    • Answers
      • 1. ‘Repose’ (line 2) means
      • a. clouds
      • b. going backwards
      • c. resting
      • 2. ‘As thick as rain’ (line 4) is an example of
      • a. metaphor
      • b. simile
      • c. alliteration
      • 3. The sun’s ‘golden fingers’ (line 8) is an example of
      • a. metaphor
      • b. alliteration
      • c. personification
      • 4. ‘Spider-clad’ (line 9) means
      • a. the spiders have dresses on
      • b. there are lots of cobwebs
      • c. there are no spiders
      •  
      • 5. The ‘hayloft’ (line 12) is
      • a. where you keep hay
      • b. where you keep ladders
      • c. decorated with ladders
      •  
      •  
      • Questions
      • Identify the main actors in the film and explain why you know this.
      • Identify the dominant image and explain why it is important.
      • Describe how the rule of thirds has been used.
      • Explain how the colours used create a mood.
      • Explain why the word ‘twilight’ is placed behind the hills.
    • Answers
      • The main actors are Kristen Stewart and Robert Pattinson, I know this because their names are written at the top of the poster.
      • The dominant image is of Kristen Stewart, this is important because it shows that she is the main character in the film and that the plot will revolve around her.
      • The rule of thirds has been used to divide the poster into 3 horizontal sections which help the viewer’s eyes to focus on 3 different aspects. The top section has the heads of the main characters and their names so that we know who the important characters are and what their names are. The middle section shows the moon and the title of the film, this gives the viewer the title of the film and the moon helps to reflect the title of the film. The bottom section shows information to the viewer.
      • The colours are brown, black, and yellow. The brown and black help to create an earthy and mysterious mood and the yellow symbolises hope.
      • The word ‘twilight’ is placed behind the hills to look like it is disappearing like the sun does at twilight – the end of the day and the beginning of night.
      • Dear Mr. Fraser,
      • As an avid skater on both blades and wheels, I can't imagine a better job than sharing my enthusiasm with your customers. When I saw your advert in the New Zealand Herald for a junior sales person, I immediately put together the attached C.V to send you. Please consider me for the position.
      • I am available for an interview any day during the holidays next week. Please let me know when you are available to meet with me.
      • Thank you!
      • Andrew Hohepa
      • Questions
      • Identify the job that Andrew Hohepa is applying for.
      • Identify what Andrew enjoys doing.
      • Explain what ‘avid’ means.
      • Is this piece of writing written in 1 st , 2 nd or 3 rd person? Explain why.
      • When is Andrew available for an interview?
    • Answers
      • Junior sales person.
      • Ice skating and roller skating/blading.
      • Keen, enthusiastic, eager, passionate.
      • Ist person because the personal pronoun ‘I’ is used.
      • During the holidays.
    • Some Days
      • 1. The words ‘is a huge
      • concrete sandwich’ is
      • an example of what
      • poetic technique?
      • 2. In stanza two the
      • poet says that on some
      • days the poet is not
      • happy about school.
      • Which words tell you
      • this?
      • 3. What impression of
      • the school is given by
      • the words ‘The school
      • is a rocket’?
      • 4. The poem is called
      • School Days because
      •   a) his attitude changes on different days
      • b) he feels better if the teachers are kind
      • c) he daydreams about rockets
      Some days this school is a huge concrete sandwich squeezing me out like jam. It weighs so much breathing hurts, my legs freeze my body is heavy. On days like that I carry whole buildings high on my back. Other days the school is a rocket thrusting right into the sun. It’s yellow and green freshly painted, the cabin windows gleam with laughter On days like that whole buildings support me, my ladder is pushing over their rooftops. Amongst the clouds I’d need a computer to count all the bubbles bursting aloud in my head.
    • Answers
      • 1. The words ‘is a huge concrete sandwich’ is an example of what poetic technique?
      • Metaphor
      •  
      • 2. In stanza two the poet says that on some days the poet is not happy about school. Which words tell you this?
      • It weighs so much
      • Hurts
      • Heavy
      •  
      • 3. What impression of the school is given by the words ‘The school is a rocket’?
      •  
      • It is exciting/dynamic/challenging.
      • The day moves fast.
      •  
      • 4. The poem is called School Days because
      •  
      • a. his attitude changes on different days
      • b. he feels better if the teachers are kind
      • c. he daydreams about rockets
      • d. he is getting a new computer
      • Portrait of a Machine by Louis Untermeyer
      • What nudity as beautiful as this
      • Obedient monster purring at its toil;
      • Those naked iron muscles dripping oil,
      • And the sure-fingered rods that never miss?
      • This long and shining flank of metal is
      • Magic that greasy labour cannot spoil:
      • While this vast engine that could rend the soil
      • Conceals its fury with a gentle hiss.
      •  
      • It does not vent its loathing, it does not turn
      • Upon its makers with destroying hate.
      • It bears a deeper malice; lives to earn
      • Its master’s bread and laughs to see this great
      • Lord of the earth, who rules but cannot learn,
      • Become the slave of what his slaves create.
      •  
      •  
      • Questions
      •  
      • What words in the first five lines suggest that the machine is living?
      •   Name two qualities of the machine which the poet seems to praise in the first eight lines.
      • What words suggest that the machine is powerful?
      • What is the machine’s attitude to its master?
      •  
      •  
    • Answers
      • 1. What words in the first five lines suggest that the machine is living?
      • Purring
      • toil
      • obedient
      • sure fingered
      • naked/nudity
      • muscles
      • 2. Name two qualities of the machine which the poet seems to praise in the first eight lines.
      • Any TWO of:
      • Beauty
      • Obedience
      • Controlled strength
      • Skill
      •  
      • 3. What words in the first eight lines suggest that the machine is powerful?
      •   Monster
      • Muscles
      • Vast engine
      •  
      • 4. What is the machine’s attitude to its master?
      • Contempt
      • Scornful
      •  
      •  
      •  
      • Bird in the Classroom
      • The students drowsed and drowned
      • In the teacher’s ponderous monotone
      • Limp bodies looping in the wordy heat,
      • Melted and run together, desks and flesh as one, Swooning and swimming in a sea of drone.
      • Each one asleep, swayed and vaguely drifted With lidding eyes and lolling, weighted heads, And then, on a sudden, a bird’s cool voice
      • Punched out song. Crisp and spare
      • On the startled air, Beak-beamed
      • Or idly tossed, Each note gleamed
      • Like a bead of frost.
      •  
      • Ears cocked, before the comment ran
      • Fading and chuckling where a wattle stirred, The students wondered how they could have heard Such dreary monotones from man,
      • Such wisdom from a bird.
      • by Colin Theile
      •  
      • Questions
      • 1. What is the ‘teacher’s ponderous monotone’? What do the students think of it?
      • Identify two language techniques in the last line of the first paragraph.
      • 3. What two words indicate a change of direction in the poem? What is the change?
      • 4. Who has got their ears cocked and why?
      • 5. What are two effects of the bird’s voice?
    • Answers
      • 1. What is the ‘teacher’s ponderous monotone’? What do the students think of it?
      •   The flat, boring voice of the teacher.
      • The slow, lifeless voice of the teacher in front of the class.
      • The ‘ponderous monotone’ is the teachers voice. It is dull and flat.
      •   They are bored and feel like going to sleep.
      • They are hot and are feel like they are drowning in the heat.
      • They feel like they are drowning in the boring voice.
      •  
      • 2. Identify two language techniques in the last line of the first paragraph.
      • Alliteration AND metaphor 
      •  
      • 3. What two words indicate a change of direction in the poem? What is the change?
      • Words: And then, Change: The bird started singing.
      •  
      • 4. Who has got their ears cocked and why?
      •  
      • Who: The students Why: Because the sound broke the monotony of the teacher’s voice.
      • Because they were surprised to hear the voice.
      •  
      •  
      • 5. What are two effects of the bird’s voice?
      •  
      • It ‘sprang the heat like drops of ice’ which means it seemed to melt the heat away and make the students have more life.
      • It made the students wonder how a little bird could have made them think/catch their attention but a man could be so boring and monotonous.
      •  
    • Questions: 1. In pairs, identify the colours used and explain what the purpose of each one is. 2. Explain the following terms in relation to the poster: Audience - who is the audience? Purpose - what is the purpose of the poster?
    • Answers
      • The colours used are dark blue, red, gold and white. Dark blue symbolises seriousness, trust, responsibility and strength. It is used to show that the main characters have these attributes. Red symbolises action, danger and energy and is used to show that the Iron Man has these characteristics. Gold symbolises wealth and royalty and is used on the Iron Man to imply these characteristics. White is used as a contrast to highlight the action in the film.
      • The audience is young people who enjoy action hero films.
      • The purpose of the poster is to attract the target audience by showing them the actors involved, some of the action that is likely to happen, and also the details they need to know about who was involved in the production of the film. Details are also given to find out more information
      • KILLING MY SISTER’S FISH
      • I picked up the bottle with its gladiator shoulders –
      • inside its shirred, greyish plastic
      • ammonia, more muscular than water, pungent –
      • I poured one dollop, gleaming genie,
      • into the bowl with my sister’s goldfish
      • just because they were alive, and she liked them.
      • … I saw the bowl, and the ammonia curled
      • for a moment in the air like a spirit. Then I crawled up under the floor-joists, into the tangent
      • where the soil curved up, and I lay there
      • at the ends of the earth, as if without
      • regret, as if something set in motion
      • long before I had been conceived
      • had been accomplished.
      • Sharon Olds
      •  
      •  
      •  
      1. Identify one example of a metaphor. 2. Identify one example of onomatopoeia. 3. Write one example of a first person pronoun. 4. What tense is the verb “picked”? 5. Write the subject of the sentence: “I picked up the bottle with its gladiator shoulders...” 6. Write one example of a compound word. 7. Why does the poet describe the bottle as having “gladiator shoulders”?
    • Answers
      • I picked up the bottle with its gladiator shoulders –
      • Dollop
      • I
      • Past
      • Bottle
      • Goldfish
      • To describe how strong and powerful ammonia is and to help us picture the shape of the bottle.
      • The Reading Killer by Roald Dahl
      •  
      • The most important thing we’ve learned
      • So far as children are concerned,
      • Is never, Never NEVER let
      • Them near your television set
      • Or better still, just don’t install
      • The idiotic thing at all.
      • In almost every house we’ve been,
      • We’ve watched them gaping at the screen.
      • They loll and slop and lounge about,
      • And stare until their eyes pop out
      •  
      • They sit and stare and stare and sit
      • Until they’re hypnotized by it.
      • Until they are absolutely drunk
      • With all that shocking ghastly junk.
      • Oh yes, we know it keeps them still
      • They don’t climb out the window sill,
      •   They never fight or kick or punch…
      •  
      •  
      •  
      • QUESTIONS
      • Find one example of rhyme in the poem.
      • Find two examples of repetition.
      • The final line contains an example of a metaphor or onomatopoeia.
      • List 2 pronouns from the poem.
    • Answers
      • The end of each pair of lines rhymes.
      • Never, never, never. Stare and sit and sit and stare.
      • Onomatopoeia – punch.
      • We’ve and they.
      • Sands by Laura Ranger
      •  
      • My skin is as smooth
      • As polished wood.
      • When my mother strokes me
      • She sands me
      • With her hands.
      •  
      • My skin is as smooth
      • As a piece of driftwood
      • On Otaki beach.
      • Waves smashing.
      • And sand makes it smooth
      • As seagull feathers.
      •  
      •  
      •  
      •  
      •  
      • Questions
      • Write down one simile from the poem.
      • What sound technique is used in the last three lines of the poem?
      • The feeling in this poem is one of
      • sadness
      • excitement
      • anger
      • contentment
      • 4. Explain the two meanings of the title, ‘Sands’.
      • 5. Write down one metaphor for the poem.
    • Answers
      • 1. Write down one simile from the above poem.  
      • Any ONE of:
      • My skin is as smooth/As polished wood.
      • My skin is as smooth /As a piece of driftwood
      • makes it smooth/As seagull feathers
      •  
      • 2. What sound technique is used in the last three lines of the poem?
      •  
      • Alliteration OR onomatopoeia.
      •  
      • 3. The feeling in this poem is one of
      • contentment
      •  
      • 4. Explain the two meanings of the title, ‘Sands’.
      •  
      • The sand on the beach and the mothers hands stroking her as if she is sanding wood.
      •  
      • 5. Write down one metaphor for the above poem.
      •  
      • When my mother strokes me she sands me with her hands.
      • THEY HAVE CUT DOWN THE PINES by Mary Lisle
      • They have cut down the pines where they stood;
      • The wind will miss them - the rain,
      • When its silver blind is down.
      • They have stripped the bark from the wood -
      • The needly boughs, and the brown
      • Knobbly nuts trodden into the ground.
      • The kind, the friendly trees,
      • Where all day small winds sound,
      • And all day long the sun
      • Plays hide and seek with shadows
      • Till the multiplying shadows turn to one
      • And night is here.
      •  
      • Wan in the sunlight as ghosts
      • The naked trunks lie.
      • A bird nested there - it will seek
      • In vain : they have cut down the pines.
      • Questions
      •  
      • Why do you think the poet repeats the words ‘they have cut down the pines’?
      • What picture of the rain do the words “its silver blind is down’ give you?
      • ‘ The kind, the friendly trees ...’ What poetic device has been used here?
      • What is the simile used in the second stanza (verse)?
      • Why are the trunks described as naked?
      •  
      •  
    • Answers
      • 1. Why do you think the poet repeats the words ‘they have cut down the pines’?
      •  
      • To emphasis how senseless/sad/destructive the act is.
      • 2. What picture of the rain do the words “its silver blind is down’ give you?
      •  
      • That the rain is cutting itself off from the destructive act.
      • That the rain is crying
      • That the rain doesn’t want to see/acknowledge what is happening.
      •  
      • 3. ‘The kind, the friendly trees ...’ What poetic device has been used here?
      •  
      • Any ONE of:
      • personification
      • metaphor
      •  
      • 4. What is the simile used in the second stanza (verse)?
      •  
      • ‘ Wan in the sunlight as ghosts.’
      •  
      • 5. Why are the trunks described as naked?
      •  
      • Because they have had the branches cut off them. There are no leaves/boughs left of them.
      •  
      •  
      •  
      •  
      •  
        • 1. Identify a rhetorical question.
      • . Explain why a person with a soccer ball is in this advert.
      • . Identify the logo in this image.
      • . Explain the significance of the use of red and blue. What does each colour symbolise?
      • . Identify an example of colloquial language.
    • Answers
      • Wanna play?
      • A person with a soccer ball is in this advert so that sport and activity will be associated with this car. The advert suggests that this car is perfect for people with an active lifestyle.
      • Swift
      • Red is significant because it symbolises action, passion and energy. Blue symbolises trust, integrity and reliability. These colours suggests that the car has these attributes and that if you buy it you will too.
      • Wanna play?
      • Big Star Machine by Superchick
      • Could someone help me comprehend
      • How my wanting to have friends
      • is now this monster that I feed
      • It's popularity I need
      • When people think that I'm the deal
      • It helps me feel like I am real  
      • but I think I lost the me looking for the star machine
      • I don't want any part of it. everything is...
      • Chorus
      • Here today, gone tomorrow
      • Big star machine
      • Ricky Martin or Menudo
      • Big star machine
      • VH1 where they are followed
      • Big star machine
      •  
      •  
      •  
        • 1. Lines 4 and 5 contain the words real and deal . What poetic technique is used: alliteration , assonance or repetition ?
        • 2. What narrative style is used in this song – first, second or third person?
        • 3. Explain what the ‘Big star machine’ is.
        • 4. Identify an example of repetition and explain why it is effective in this song.
        • 5. Judge what would happen to the singer if she gave in to the effects of the ‘Big star machine’.
      •  
      •  
    • Answers
      • Assonance.
      • First person.
      • The process that bands go through to become famous – touring, merchandising, interviews, profile exposure.
      • Big star machine is repeated and this is effective because it emphasises the message of the song which is that process of becoming popular as a band is taking over.
      • Own answers to the effect of fame being more important than friends and family; losing who they really are as people; being ‘slaves’ to the system which has made them popular.