Artist Manifesto - Andy Warhol

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Artist Manifesto - Andy Warhol

  1. 1. Christine Atienza — Art 312: Twentieth Century Art — Fall 2007 — November 20, 2007 — Course Paper: Artist Manifesto
  2. 2. Atienza 2 Paper Experiment Written in first person to come from the direct viewpoint of the artist, as if Andy Warhol wrote the manifesto himself. Written in a format that parallels the mechanization of his work ethic. A simple, straight-forward declaration of artistic intent, ideals, and thoughts. Words about art for the masses that can easily be read by the masses. A sort of dialogue. Nothing too articulate, nothing too fancy. Something the common people can relate to. These are his observations, these are his itentions. This is Andy Warhol.
  3. 3. Atienza 3 Let’s face it… times have changed. People are beginning to become more and more fascinated with celebrities and normal, everyday life. It seems that the mindset has changed. Not just with art, but with life in general. It seems as if they are less interested with formality and structure. A major S H I F T . Women nowadays are way more liberal than in the past. Just look at their clothing and their lifestyles. They have become sex symbols. There is just more F R E E D O M visible. Anywhere and everywhere. I love that. I love the freedoms. I love the lack of restrictions. I want people to see that. I want to A D V E R T I S E that. In the past, there has been such a formal approach to art. More for the wealthy. More for the minority. For those that have either the time to spend to create art or the money to employ someone to do so. Oil paints, structured poses, idyllic landscapes… these are all things I want to put an end to. I want these to become a thing of the past. Not everyone can get a hold of expensive oil paints or hire a model or sit in front a vast landscape. These subjects don’t represent the T R U T H . This isn’t life as it is seen. It’s all a pose, a façade, and I don’t like that. Gone are the agricultural days of the past. We have evolved into an I N D U S T R I A L I Z E D culture. Machines, technology, it’s all so beautiful. We live in cities now. The majority middle-class shouldn’t feel like they‘re under the grip of the bourgeoisie. That is not the purpose of art. I feel that it is something E V E R Y O N E should be able to enjoy. There are two subjects that I am interested in when it comes to art, the ordinary and the idolized. To me, ordinary is something that the C O M M O N people can access. We have become a C O M M E R C I A L culture, with the world revolving around us. Things that are popular revolve around us. That is what should be art. (Wikipedia: Pop Art) F A M E , an incredibly interesting concept that people are drawn to. It’s a glamorous life. I admit it, I love it. The high life. I’m so drawn to it. Like it’s a drug. The jewels, the riches, the fans, the popularity. Marilyn Monroe. Elvis Presley. Sex
  4. 4. Atienza 4 symbols. Newspapers, magazines, headlines, television, concerts, shows, appearances, openings. They are everywhere. I can’t get enough of it. The world can’t get enough of it. And yet, I still feel that this V I S I B I L I T Y should be heightened/amplified even more. It needs to be embraced. On the opposite end, there is the “ordinary“ which I feel has the potential to be great. Just O R D I N A R Y people have the potential of becoming F A M O U S . No strain or force to be glamourous though. No pressure. Also, another concept I love. I feel that mass culture is beginning to take the world by storm. There are common things that are beginning to pop up everywhere. I C O N S . I love it. I want it plastered E V E R Y W H E R E . More, more, more. I want to recreate that. Maybe I’m the only one who wants to do this. That’s what it seems like at least. That’s fine, but I can’t do it with traditional “fine art“ methods. That would take too long. There’s no way I could reproduce the high-speed modern lifestyle with those methods. I need to tap into the new emerging technologies. I need something more efficient. I need something to mirror my subjects, products of the mass market. I will create a production line. I see my art as a “factory“ of sorts (Wikipedia: The Factory). Maybe this is R E V O L U T I O N A R Y , maybe not. I don’t think so. I don’t intend it to be a big deal. Not at all. It should be an even less important deal actually, especially since I aim to simplify things. Maybe it will be a precursor. Maybe. I drew from the past, maybe this will define the future. Maybe not. What exactly is my aim. What is my art like? It’s a lot of things. It’s a compilation. It’s a F U S I O N : Like cubism, but not. I adore the reduction of forms, but it’s a a bit too simplified. I want people to have some sense of what it is I am recreating.
  5. 5. Atienza 5 Like abstract expressionism, but not. I adore the color field aspects and gesture aspects though. A bit too much on the extreme ends of the scale, however. Like realism, but not. Perhaps with the ability to recognize forms and subjects. But that is it. Not too exact. Not too detailed. This shouldn’t be done in this time. It just doesn’t fit. Like minimalism, but not. I’m not creating an exact representation of a subject nor am I creating an extreme simplification of form. I am a simple person. I have a simple set of rules. I live in a world with common people. I live in a common world. REPETITION. SIMPLICITY. REPETITION. SIMPLICITY. REPETITION. SIMPLICITY. REPETITION. SIMPLICITY. I am Andy Warhol.
  6. 6. Atienza 6 Reference Images Andy Warhol, Red Elvis, 1962, acrylic and silkscreen on linen Andy Warhol, Elvis I and II, 1964, silkscreen on acrylic on canvas Andy Warhol, Elvis I and II, 1964, silkscreen on aluminum paint on canvas Andy Warhol, Single Elvis, 1964, silkscreen on canvas Andy Warhol, Triple Elvis, 1964, silkscreen on canvas Andy Warhol, Marilyn Diptych, 1962, acrylic, silkscreen on canvas Andy Warhol, Marilyn Monroe, 1962, acrylic, silkscreen on canvas Andy Warhol, The Two Marilyns, 1962, silkscreen on canvas Andy Warhol, Gold Marilyn Monroe, 1962, synthetic polymer, silkscreen, and oil on canvas Andy Warhol, Marilyn, 1964, silkscreen on canvas Andy Warhol, Reversal Series: Marilyn, 1979-1986, silkscreen on canvas Andy Warhol, Liz, 1965, silkscreen on canvas Andy Warhol, Large Campbell’s Soup Can, 1962, pencil on paper Andy Warhol, Campbell’s Soup Can I, 1968, acrylic and liquitex, silkscreen on canvas Andy Warhol, One Dollar Bill with Washington Portrait, 1962, pencil on paper Andy Warhol, Two Dollar Bills (front and rear), 1962, silkscreen on canvas Andy Warhol, Peach Halves, 1962, oil on canvas Andy Warhol, Close Cover before Striking (Pepsi Cola), 1962, acrylic on canvas, sandpaper Andy Warhol, 210 Coca-Cola Bottles, 1962, silkscreen on canvas Andy Warhol, Campbell’s Soup, 1962, oil on canvas Andy Warhol, Campbell’s Soup I, 1968, silkscreen prints Andy Warhol, Brillo Box, 1964, silkscreen on wood Andy Warhol, Brillo Box, 1964, silkscreen on wood Andy Warhol, Del Monte Box, 1964, silkscreen on wood Andy Warhol, Heinz Tomato Ketchup Box, 1964, silkscreen on wood Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, 1967, silkscreen on canvas Andy Warhol, Flowers, 1964, synthetic polymer, silkscreen on canvas Andy Warhol, Portrait of Leo Castelli, 1973, acrylic and silkscreen on canvas Andy Warhol, 129 DIE IN JET (Plane Crash), 1962, acrylic on canvas
  7. 7. Atienza 7 Andy Warhol, Red Race Riot, 1963, acrylic and silkscreen on canvas Andy Warhol, White Car Crash 19 Times, 1963, synthetic polymer, silkscreen on canvas Andy Warhol, Orange Car Crash 10 Times, 1963, acrylic and liquitex on canvas Andy Warhol, Orange Disaster #5, 1963, acrylic and silkscreen on canvas Andy Warhol, Green Car Crash (Green Burning Car I), 1963, acrylic and liquitex, silkscreen on canvas Andy Warhol, Big Electric Chair, 1967, acrylic and silkscreen on canvas Andy Warhol, Electric Chair, 1967, acrylic and silkscreen on canvas Andy Warhol, Double Silver Diaster, 1963, acrylic and liquitex in silkscreen on canvas Andy Warhol, Most Wanted Man No. 11 (John Joseph H., side), 1963, acrylic and liquitex, silkscreen on canvas Andy Warhol, Most Wanted Man No. 11 (John Joseph H., front), 1963, acrylic and liquitex, silkscreen on canvas Andy Warhol, Jackie Triptych, 1964, silkscreen on canvas Andy Warhol, Four Jackies, 1964, silkscreen on canvas Andy Warhol, Jackie III, 1966, silkscreen on paper Andy Warhol, Atomic Bomb, 1965, acrylic and liquitex, silkscreen on canvas Andy Warhol, Mao, 1972, acrylic, silkscreen and oil on canvas Andy Warhol, Flowers, 1970, silkscreen prints Andy Warhol, Cow Wallpaper, 1966, silkscreen on paper Andy Warhol, Mao Tse Tung, 1972, silkscreen and oil on canvas Andy Warhol, Mao Tse Tung, 1973, acrylic and silkscreen on canvas Andy Warhol, Diane von Furstenberg, 1974, acrylic and silkscreen on canvas Andy Warhol, Mick Jagger, 1975, silkscreen prints Andy Warhol, Self-Portrait, 1978, acrylic and silkscreen on canvas Andy Warhol, Black on Bloack Retrospective Reversal Series, 1979, acrylic and silver print on canvas Andy Warhol, Sill Life, 1976, acrylic and silkscreen on canvas Andy Warhol, Myths: Mickey Mouse, 1981, acrylic on canvas Andy Warhol, Gun, 1982, silkscreen on canvas Andy Warhol, U.S. Dollar Sign, 1982, silkscreen on canvas Andy Warhol, Campbell’s Noodle Soup, 1986, silkscreen on canvas Andy Warhol, Campbell’s Onion Mushroom, 1986, silkscreen on canvas Andy Warhol, Last Supper, 1986, acrylic and liquitex, silkscreen on canvas Andy Warhol, Last Self-Portrait, 1986, acrylic, silkscreen on canvas
  8. 8. Atienza 8 Bibliography Adan, Elizabeth. “Abstract Expressionism and Related Work, Continued.” Course Lecture, Art 312. Department of Art and Design, Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, October 30, 2007. Adan, Elizabeth. “American 20th Century Art and Abstract-Expressionism.” Course Lecture, Art 312. Department of Art and Design, Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, October 25, 2007. Adan, Elizabeth. “Pop Art, Happenings, and Related Developments.” Course Lecture, Art 312. Department of Art and Design, Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, November 6, 2007. Arnason, H.H. History of Modern Art: Painting Sculpture Architecture Photography. New Jersey: Prentice Hall, Inc., 2003. O’Mahony, Mike. American Art. China: Foundry Creative Media Company Limited, 2006. Hackett, Pat. The Andy Warhol Diaries. New York: Warner Books, 1989. Honnef, Klaus. Andy Warhol. Germany: Taschen, 2005. Ratcliff, Carter. Andy Warhol. New York: Abbeville Press, 1983. Wikipedia, “Andy Warhol – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia,” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andy_Warhol. Accessed October 12, 2007. Wikipedia, “Pop Art – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia,” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pop_art. Accessed October 12, 2007. Wikipedia, “The Factory – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia,” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Factory. Accessed October 12, 2007.

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