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Jigsaw research1

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  • 1. Development Developed in 1971 by Professor Elliot Aronson and his class of graduate students. Developed to combat racial tensions in recently desegregated schools It works by encouraging teamwork and collaboration among students, each student becomes an integral part of the lesson. Students must work together as a team to accomplish a common goal. Most importantly a student cannot succeed without the help of their group members and classmates.
  • 2. How it Works The teacher presents a topic to the class The classroom is then divided into small groups of 5 to 6 students per group Each student is responsible for researching a different part of the topic
  • 3. ExampleThomas JeffersonIrida will research Jefferson’s early lifeChristie will research Jefferson as Governor of VirginiaJim Will research Jefferson’s PresidencyMike will research Jeffersons legacy
  • 4.  To create cooperation among the whole class, each student will meet with their counterpart from the other groups in the class; this group is called the “Expert Group” In expert groups students can compare information and rehearse their presentations After meeting in expert groups, the students return to their original groups and present their part of the project (Jim will teach his group members about Jefferson’s presidency)
  • 5. Variations Instead of assigning each student with a part to complete individually; each group will be responsible for researching a component of a subject matter The group will then present their part of the project to the rest of the class.
  • 6. Jigsaw Pros: Efficient way to learn material Students have an active role and are directly engaged with the material. Students must gain a deeper understanding of the material in order to teach it.
  • 7. More Jigsaw Pros: Each student makes an important contribution to the group. Encourages discussion, problem solving, and learning. Encourages cooperation.
  • 8. Jigsaw benefits as documented by Aronson &Patnoe (1997): Improved attitudes toward school. Increased self-esteem. Improved academic achievement. Improved perception of support from peers. Lower absenteeism
  • 9. Cons:  Does not work well for topics in which students are expected to know all components equally well.  Students accustomed to competing may take some time to adjust to this technique.  Lower-achieving students may fail to adequately convey the information to the home group.
  • 10. More Cons: In expert groups, certain students may try to dominate. Without a group task which incorporates all of the material, there is little incentive to learn from peer teachers. To prevent students from coasting, assign individual work that incorporates all aspects of the jigsaw topic.
  • 11. Uses for the Jigsaw Method There are several different uses for the Jigsaw method. It allows students to help teach themselves and teach their fellow students. Jigsaw helps students gain a better understanding of material.
  • 12. Uses in Literature Groups of students can each given a short story and each group is given a different character in the story to analyze.  Example: One group examines the protagonist and another the antagonist. Debates and Role playing activities are also a beneficial use of jigsaw.  Each group gets up and portrays their given character.
  • 13. Uses in Science Jigsaw is an effective method to use for teaching science. Field trips are a great way to use Jigsaw.  Example: Students can be broken up into groups and each group will be given a different type of rock to examine.  Each group will then describe their rock and try to figure out what time.
  • 14. Uses in Social Studies Jigsaw is effective in the History classroom.  Example: Each group will be assigned a different aspect of World War II.  One group gets the European front, another gets the Pacific front and a third gets the war on the home front.  The students than can create an overall class discussion and educate the other groups on their area through discussion.

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