Uploaded on

Some economic data that I have collected

Some economic data that I have collected

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
189
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. ECONOMIC UPDATEVOLATILITY & UNCERTAINTY 1
  • 2. Draft, Subject to Equity Markets: Volatility amid uncertainty ECONOMIC UPDATE Revision1,800 World Equity Index (MWOD) S&P 5001,6001,4001,2001,000 800 600 Equity markets are swinging day‐to‐day in line with the economic outlook of the moment as  markets try to price in what they know Markets rallied in Q1 following the avoidance of Greek default and expectations for further  Fed action, but Europe concerns are resurfacing Sources: MSCI and Standard and Poors.  Data as of August 16, 2012.  2
  • 3. Executive sentiment on the global economy is also mixed…but  ECONOMIC UPDATEtrending negatively  1/3 of executives feel we will  be in roughly the same place  economically as we are today  Nearly 50% of executives  believe we will be in a worse  positionSource: McKinsey & Co., Economic Conditions Snapshot, June 2012  3
  • 4. U.S. Economists are similarly uncertain…  ECONOMIC UPDATE Economist’s responses to the question: “How do you assess the overall condition of  the U.S. economy right now”:Source: Kaufman Economic Outlook: First Quarter 2012 4
  • 5. This uncertainty is set against the backdrop of the slowest  ECONOMIC UPDATEeconomic recovery in U.S. history Note: the annual GDP growth for the four years following each recession Great Depression 1980s Current Recovery14% 13.1%12% 10.9%10% 8.9%8% 7.2%6% 5.1% 4.5% 4.1%4% 3.5% 2.4% 2.0% 2.3% 1.8%2%0% 1934 1935 1936 1937 1983 1984 1985 1986 2010 2011 2012E 2013E 1947 – 2007, average annual growth was 3.4% 1977 – 2007, average annual growth was 3.0% Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis, Wall Street Journal: Edward P. Lazear 5
  • 6. Worldwide debt load is contributing to long‐term uncertainty ECONOMIC UPDATE Government Debt 180% % of GDP, 2012 Projection 160% 140% 153% 120% 123% 100% 113% 112% 107% 80% 89% 88% 60% 79% 79% 68% 65% 40% 20% 22% 8% 0% Source: IMF  U.S. debt is at the highest level since WWII  U.S. debt excludes the unfunded liabilities of Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid  which adds a further $66 trillion at the same present value basis  Including these liabilities, the debt totals 530% of GDP  6
  • 7. Mounting U.S. Public Debt ECONOMIC UPDATE U.S. Public Debt Outstanding $ Trillions $18 $16 $14 $12 Dec ‘01 – Dec ‘08 CAGR = 8.8%  $10 $8 Dec ‘08 – Jun ‘12 CAGR = 11.7%  $6 $4 $2 $0 Dec‐01 Jun‐02 Dec‐02 Jun‐03 Dec‐03 Jun‐04 Dec‐04 Jun‐05 Dec‐05 Jun‐06 Dec‐06 Jun‐07 Dec‐07 Jun‐08 Dec‐08 Jun‐09 Dec‐09 Jun‐10 Dec‐10 Jun‐11 Dec‐11 Jun‐12 Source: Treasury Direct 7
  • 8. U.S. debt is at the highest point since WWII ECONOMIC UPDATE Source: Treasury Direct  This excludes the unfunded liabilities of Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid which adds  a further $66 trillion at the same present value basis Including these liabilities, the debt totals 530% of GDP  Source: PIMCO 8
  • 9. While debt mounts, the U.S. is also experiencing a recent  ECONOMIC UPDATEslowdown in GDP growth U.S. Real GDP 2007 ‐ Q2 2012, $ Trillions$14 Avg. Quarterly Growth$14 = 0.62%$13$13 Avg. Quarterly Growth = 0.47%$13$13$13$12$12 Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis In July, the IMF revised expected U.S. GDP growth down to just 2.0% annual growth, a  decline of 0.1% and the second downgrade this year FOMC revised 2012 estimates down in July to a range of 1.9% to 2.4% Q2 annualized GDP growth totaled just 1.5%  9
  • 10. The U.S. economy is fueled by consumption – jobs and real  ECONOMIC UPDATEincome growth are needed to resume GDP growth U.S. GDP Components: Q112$16 ($ Trillions) Other Financial Services 11% 7% Durable goods 14%$14 Government  Food services Expenditures  6%$12 and Investment Recreation services Nondurable goods Private  4% 22% Domestic $10 Investment Transportation  Health care services 16% Housing and  $8 3% utilities 17% $6 Personal  Consumption $4  71% of U.S. GDP is consumption $2  Housing and utilities are the largest  component of consumption spending,  $0 representing 12% of total GDP Nex Exports ‐$2 Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis 10
  • 11. U.S. unemployment is persistently high and recovering slowly ECONOMIC UPDATE U.S. Unemployment Rate 18% Oct ‘09: 17.2% 16% 15.0% 14% Under‐employment 12% Oct ‘10: 10.0% 10% 8.3% 8% Unemployment 6% 4% Dec‐04 May‐05 Dec‐09 May‐10 Jan‐02 Jun‐02 Apr‐03 Oct‐05 Mar‐06 Aug‐06 Jan‐07 Jun‐07 Apr‐08 Oct‐10 Mar‐11 Aug‐11 Jan‐12 Jun‐12 Nov‐02 Sep‐03 Feb‐04 Jul‐04 Nov‐07 Sep‐08 Feb‐09 Jul‐09 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics As consumer spending comprises 71% of U.S. GDP, job growth is fundamental to economic  recovery Fed Chairman Bernanke foresees “frustratingly slow” job recovery 11
  • 12. The U.S. is running a big jobs deficit ECONOMIC UPDATE Total Job Gain/Loss (Thousands) 600 400 7.6M jobs lost from 2008 ‐ 2010 200 0 ‐200 2.7M jobs added ‐400 ‐600 ‐800 ‐1000 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics  From Q1’11 – Q1’12 an average of 166k jobs were being added each month  Q2’12 averaged just 73k jobs added per month, less than the 130k average added in Q2’11  At 75k per month it will take 5 ½ years to overcome the losses since 2008  Even at 200k per month we are looking at a two year recovery 12
  • 13. Corporate Profits and Layoffs are highly correlated ECONOMIC UPDATE Corporate Profits and Layoff Claimants  1,800 1000 Layoff Claimants (thousands) 900 Corporate Profits ($ Billions)  1,600  1,400 800  1,200 700 600  1,000 500  800 400  600 300  400 Corporate Profits After Taxes 200  200 Layoff Claimaints 100  ‐ 0 Sources: Bureau of Economic Analysis Increasing profits have resulted in fewer layoff claims 13
  • 14. Corporate Profits weakened in Q1 and downgrades dominated  ECONOMIC UPDATEearnings guidance in Q2 S&P 500 Index vs. Corporate Profits After  Taxes ($ Billions)  1,800  1,600 Corporate Profits  1,400  1,200 S&P 500  1,000  800  600  400  200  ‐ Q102 Q302 Q103 Q303 Q104 Q304 Q105 Q305 Q106 Q306 Q107 Q307 Q108 Q308 Q109 Q309 Q110 Q310 Q111 Q311 Q112 Sources: Bureau of Economic Analysis, Standard and Poors Profits of U.S. companies declined during Q1’12 after reaching all‐time highs in Q4’11 The number of S&P companies issuing profit warnings was four times that of upside  revisions in Q2 Further profit weakness could lead to slower job recovery and increasing layoffs 14
  • 15. Median Net Worth and Real Income levels have taken a BIG hit  ECONOMIC UPDATEin the last decade Real Median Household Income ($ Thousands) $54 $53 $53 $52 $52 $51 $51 $50 $50 $49 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Median net worth has declined 39% since 2007, or at a level last seen in 1992 Loss of home equity is the largest contributing factor to Net Worth declines as median  home equity fell by 42%  Real median incomes are now 7% lower than they were one decade agoSources: Federal Reserve, U.S. Census Bureau 15
  • 16. As household income declines, consumer spending follows ECONOMIC UPDATE Real Median Household Income and Consumer Spending Consumer Spending, % YoY Real Median Household Income, $ Thousands $54 8% $53 6% $53 $52 4% $52 2% $51 $51 0% $50 ‐2% $50 $49 ‐4% 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Sources: Census Bureau, Bureau of Labor Statistics Consumer spending declined considerably beginning in 2008 from the highs experienced in  the middle of the decade Retail sales have declined for three consecutive months – the first time that has happened  since 2010 16
  • 17. And then there is the rapidly approaching Fiscal Cliff ECONOMIC UPDATE % GDP Growth 3% 2% 1% 2.3% CBO estimates that falling off the  0% Fiscal Cliff could equate to a 3.5% ‐1% ‐1.2% contraction of GDP Fall back into recession‐2%‐3%‐4% 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012E 2013E 2013E What is it? • Expiring tax cuts and automatic spending cuts that would reduce the deficit by ~$600B, thus slowing GDP growth • Reaching the debt ceiling yet again (last time meant a downgrade to U.S. credit rating) Why does it matter? • The CBO estimates that the expiring tax cuts and spending cuts would cut GDP by 3.5 percentage points How does one avoid falling off the cliff? • Stop tax cuts from expiring, extend spending • BUT political capital is at stake and this is an election yearSources: IMF, RBS, Congressional Budget Office, Bureau of Economic Analysis 17
  • 18. The Fiscal Cliff threatens to stall growth ECONOMIC UPDATESource: Bloomberg, Gallup, Labor Department Both consumer confidence and jobs growth stalled during the last debate over increasing  the debt ceiling The consensus is that Washington will not act until after the election and could create  further uncertainty and market volatility 18
  • 19. Draft, Subject to Recent U.S. economic indicators are not promising ECONOMIC UPDATE Revision Growth slowed in two consecutive quarters GDP Fed and IMF revised GDP estimates downward in July Unemployment Jobs growth is decelerating: Rate of job growth in Q2  averaged just 73k per month, down from 225k in Q1 Corporate Profits Four times as many S&P companies downgraded their ROY  profit estimates as raised them during Q2 Consumer Confidence June saw the first decline in 9 months but July confidence  increased slightly Housing Starts declined in July but permits increased Housing Foreclosure starts up in July – third straight month Manufacturing Manufacturing declined for the first time in 3 years Retail sales declined in Q2 – the largest quarterly decline  Retail Sales since 2009 19
  • 20. Despite a rebound in 2010, European growth has faltered ECONOMIC UPDATE Europe GDP Growth % YoY 8% 6% 4% 2% 0% 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 ‐2% Euro Area Germany ‐4% Italy Spain Greece U.K. ‐6% ‐8% Source: IMF After a rebound in 2010, Greece, Italy, and Spain are acting to dampen recovery 2012 GDP is expected to contract by 0.3% 20
  • 21. European borrowing rates are diverging as investors question  Draft, Subject to  ECONOMIC UPDATEwhether peripheral countries can honor their obligationsRevision European Debt – 10 Year Rate Portugal Spain Italy UK France Germany Source: Capital IQ, August 14, 2012 Recent widening in rate markets indicate that Spain and Italy are renewed worries Rates in Germany and France driven to new lows as investors flee to perceived safe havens  21
  • 22. European equity markets have similarly diverged as investors  ECONOMIC UPDATEseek safe‐havens European Equity Markets – 3 Yr. Return Germany DAX STOXX Europe 600 Spain MSCI Source: Capital IQ, July 23, 2012 European markets are down 11% from  their April 2011 highs; Germany not immune as DAX  down 16% in the same period July saw the largest decline in the Stoxx Europe 600 index since April 2010 on fears of Spain  needing a bailout and that Greece might default 22
  • 23. European unemployment is now 11.1% ECONOMIC UPDATE Current European Unemployment Youth Unemployment Germany 6% Germany 9% Italy 10% Euro area 21% France 10% France 23% Euro area 11% Italy 29% Ireland 15% Ireland 29% Portugal 15% Portugal 30% Greece Greece 44% 23% Spain 46% Spain 25% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% Source: Eurostat Unemployment in Europe is currently 11.1% and is expected to rise in Q3 to 11.2%;  Spain  unemployment is nearly 25% Youth unemployment (under 25s) approaching 50% in Greece and Spain 23
  • 24. Europe: A sobering summary ECONOMIC UPDATE Est. 2012 GDP  Est. 2013 GDP Unemployment Growth Growth Germany 5.4% +1.0% +1.4% France 10.1% +0.3% +0.8% U.K. 8.0% +0.2% +1.4% Spain 24.8% (1.5%) (0.6%) Italy 10.8% (1.9%) (0.3%) Portugal 15.4% (3.3%) +0.3% Greece 23.1% (4.7%) 0.0%Sources: GDP: IMF; Unemployment: Eurostat 24
  • 25. While the West struggles to grow, the BRICs have provided a  ECONOMIC UPDATEdecade of solid economic growth Avg. Annual  BRIC GDP Growth Growth 2000‐2010 20% % YoY China 10.3% India 7.3% 15% Russia 5.4% Brazil 3.7% China 10% Brazil 5% India 0% Russia ‐5% ‐10% 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Source: IMFChina’s GDP grew in excess of 10% annually in the last decadeChina is already the second largest economy in the world and projected to be larger than the  U.S. before 2020Growth in the developing world is projected to moderate but still grow well in excess of the  developed economies 25
  • 26. Pocket of Growth: BRICs are projected to continue their growth  ECONOMIC UPDATEbut at a slowing rate BRIC GDP Growth 20% % YoY Avg. Annual Growth 2000‐2007 2008‐2010 2011‐2017 China 10.5% 9.8% 8.6% 15% India 7.1% 7.8% 7.3% Russia 7.2% 0.6% 4.0% Brazil 3.5% 4.1% 3.7% 10% 5% 0% Brazil China ‐5% India Russia ‐10% 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Source: IMF  China’s large export economy largely depends on the consuming nations of the West to  fuel continued growth—investment in infrastructure  and manufacturing  The IMF reduced their growth forecasts in July for China and the other BRIC countries 26
  • 27. The fundamentals are working in favor of developing countries  ECONOMIC UPDATEhave more economic influence Avg. GDP Growth 2012 ‐ 20179%8% 8.5%7% 7.3%6%5%4% 3.9% 3.9%3% 2.9%2%1% 1.2%0% China India Russia Brazil U.S. Euro ZoneSource: IMF China is projected to become the largest economy in  the world by 2020 Europe becoming less of an influence Source: Euromonitor 27
  • 28. Economic Takeaways ECONOMIC UPDATE GDP growth is slowing; ‘12 & ’13 forecasts being revised downward The approaching Fiscal Cliff could slow growth further Job and real income growth are key to recovery Conditions in Europe are unstable and performance is diverging Developing nations still offer long‐term opportunity 28
  • 29. Considerations ECONOMIC UPDATE The near‐term outlook should invoke a healthy dose  of cynicism in all of us • Reviewing assumptions for ROY is prudent We need to be contemplating a number of scenarios  • Growth is by no means certain in the near‐ to medium‐term Europe is the greatest near‐term worry and is likely to  be challenging for years to come • Particular attention should be given to European growth plans and assumptions need to be  tested Continue to look for growth where the dynamics are  still favorable • BRICs • Other emerging economies 29