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  • 1. Citing a Play (as in A Doll House ) 
  • 2. Underline or italicize titles of plays (or any other long piece of literature for that matter).
    • A Doll House
    • or
    • A Doll House
  • 3. Always Identify Who Wrote the Text
    • Henrik Ibsen, the author of A Doll House …
  • 4. ICCEE
    • I ntroduce the quotation
    • C ite the quotation
    • C lose the quotation
    • E xplain the context
    • E xpand your analysis
  • 5. What was that again?
    • I ntroduce (Always introduce the passage by identifying the narrator or the character speaking.)
    • Nora explains,
    • Nora retorts,
    • The narrator writes, (Well, there is no narrator in A Doll House , but you could say this for a text like Siddhartha .)
  • 6.
    • C ite the text by using quotation marks (Always put quotation marks in front of and behind anything you take from the text.)
    • Nora says, “I’ve been…”
    • Torvald says, “You mustn’t worry about anything, Nora…”
  • 7.
    • C lose your citation of the text by putting parenthesis ( ) around the page number where you found the passage. Place the period on the outside of the parenthesis.
    • Nora says, “This is the first time that we two – you and I, man and wife-have had a serious talk together” (225).
  • 8. E xplain the context (what was going on during the selected passage) in one or two sentences. Nora’s begging is a desperate attempt to prevent Torvald from checking the mail before the costume party.
  • 9. More on that Explaining thing…
    • You may explain the context before or after you cite the quotation.
    • Remember to keep the context brief. Otherwise, you are in grave danger of lapsing into plot summary. Anyone can retell the story, but you are smarter than that. Just grab your reader’s hand and show him exactly what scene you are focusing on in your essay.
  • 10. E xpand on your citation (This is your analysis, your thinking, the “So what?” that can’t be found in the text. This is where you tell your reader how the passage you are citing proves your claim, your topic sentence, or your thesis statement.)
    • The following sample is discussing the significance of the mailbox.
    • Nora’s desperation when Torvald heads toward the mailbox highlights the significance of the mailbox: Torvald’s control over Nora. Because Torvald is the only one with the key to the mailbox, Nora is locked away from the outside world and all it has to offer, a world that women aren’t allowed to enter. Nora knows that once Torvald unlocks the mailbox and learns about Nora’s deception, he will be figuratively opening up a new and frightening world for Nora, a world where no man will control her thoughts and her development as a human being.
  • 11. Sample ICCEE Paragraph
    • The motif of the mailbox in Ibsen’s play A Doll House symbolizes the power and control Torvald has over Nora. When Torvald is about to head to the mailbox before the costume party, Nora pleads, “No, no! Don’t do that, Torvald!” (17). Nora’s desperation manifests when Torvald almost checks the mail thus highlighting the power of this motif: Torvald’s control over Nora. Because Torvald is the only one with the key to the mailbox, Nora is locked away from the outside world and all it has to offer, a world that women aren’t allowed to enter. Nora knows that once Torvald unlocks the mailbox and learns about Nora’s deception, he will be figuratively opening up a new and frightening world for Nora, a world where no man will control her thoughts and her development as a human being, a world where Nora will no longer be anyone’s doll-wife.