Thinking inside the box workshop with Haleh Moravej
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Thinking inside the box workshop with Haleh Moravej

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CELT Learning and Teaching Conference 4 July 2014

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  • Creative learning and teaching: <br /> Why is this so important? (on sticky notes) <br />
  • to be printed <br /> <br /> Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking <br />
  • Creative learning and teaching: <br /> Why is this so important? (on sticky notes) <br />

Thinking inside the box workshop with Haleh Moravej Thinking inside the box workshop with Haleh Moravej Presentation Transcript

  • Chrissi Nerantzi Academic Developer Manchester Metropolitan University @chrissinerantzi Haleh Moravej Senior Lecturer in Nutrition Science Manchester Metropolitan University @halehmoravej CELTAnnualLearning&TeachingConference,MMU,4July2014
  • By the end of this session, colleagues will be able to: • Discuss the concept of thinking inside-the-box as an enabler to innovate • Share and experience collaborative problem- solving and ideas generation linked to a specific constraining learning and teaching scenario • Identify opportunities for innovative thinking and action within constraints linked to own practice to transform the student experience Workshopintendedlearningoutcomes
  • Reminder “Problems are things or states that someone thinks are worthy of attention or investigation. They might be visualised from two very different perspectives. The first sees a problem as an issue that needs to be resolved or rectified, the second that there is an opportunity for something different.” (Jackson, 1996, 3)
  • Curriculum … is a creative act but it usually focuses on… •norm •core knowledge of discipline •assessment •orientation internally and externally •informal adjustments ongoing •crammed? Creative Curriculum … is a creative act that focuses on… •space •flexibility •originality •personalisation •collaboration
  • little-c, big-C (Mihalyi Csikszentmihalyi, 1997) big C – extraordinary creativity, transformation of a domain, person well known in his field – breaking the norm! When we think of creativity we usually think of big C people little c – everyday creativity, problem-solving at personal level, person not known to many others
  • In flow (Mihalyi Csikszentmihalyi) http://indiedevstories.files.wordpress.com/2011/03/flow-channel1.png
  • http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_5q3g5rw4GBI/TFA1MnCDkZI/AAAAAAAAAAM/2IHEbv_YUHk/s1600/whitebox.jpg INSIDE: Reflect on the limitations you experience linked to a specific learning & teaching situation. – individual task
  • #thinkbox #thinkboxOUTSIDE: Discuss with others and capture some ideas on the outside of your box that would help you resolve your problem. KEEP ONE SIDE BLANK!!!
  • On blank side: Ideas to follow up, things to try!
  • Join the Greenhouse ;) monthly gatherings around the university to share creative and innovative practice, experiment with learning & teaching ideas cross-disciplinary fertilisation explore opportunities for wider engagement and dissemination infect others https://www.flickr.com/photos/21614692@N02/sets/72157642314666495/page2/ http://www.celt.mmu.ac.uk/flex/greenhouse.php
  • Creativity • Preparation • immersion in the material • Incubation • matures during incubation • Illumination • full consciousness, testing in the real world, refined, examined • Verification • made whole, completed earliest description of creative process Wallas G (1926) The art of thought, New York: Harcourt Gelb (1996) •preparation •generation •incubation •evaluation •implementation
  • “People tend to be more satisfied if they are able to be creative; and that individually and collectively we need to be creative to continually adapt and invent in an ever-changing world” (Jackson, 1996, 1)
  • source: http://izquotes.com/quotes-pictures/quote-a-new-idea-is-first-condemned-as-ridiculous-and-then-dismissed-as-trivial-until-finally-it- william-james-345047.jpg
  • References Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1997) Creativity: Flow and the Psychology of Discovery and Invention, Harper Perennial Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1990) Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience, Harper Perennial Dineen, R. (1996) Views from the chalk face. Lecturers’ and students’ perspectives on the development of creativity in art and design, in: Jackson, N., Oliver, M., Shaw, M. and Wisdom, J. (1996) Developing Creativity in Higher Education. An imaginative curriculum, Oxon: Routledge, pp. 109-117 Jackson, N. (1996) Imagining a different world, in: Jackson, N., Oliver, M., Shaw, M. and Wisdom, J. (1996) Developing Creativity in Higher Education, pp. 1-9 Torrance E P (1974) Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking, Lexington, MA: Personnel Press
  • Chrissi Nerantzi Academic Developer Manchester Metropolitan University @chrissinerantzi Haleh Moravej Senior Lecturer in Nutrition Science Manchester Metropolitan University @halehmoravej CELTAnnualLearning&TeachingConference,MMU,4July2014
  • Torrance,1974)
  • Oh, no! It can’t be done. I can’t do it. There is nothing I can do. But I am not creative. That is childish. What will people think? Unaccepted! Play it safe! Blockage Attitude Curiosity Challenge Belief that mistakes are welcome Ability to see the need for improvement Belief that problems can be solved Ability to suspend judgement and criticism Seeing the good in the bad Problems lead to improvements Problem can also be a solution
  • Reminder to self • Pay attention to your ideas • Keep an ideas (e-)booklet! • Start mind mapping • Put ideas into practice • Use available technology • Change surroundings • Challenge assumptions • Create connections, associations • Develop creative habits of mind
  • Creativity Evolution new ideas from existing ideas Synthesis combination of existing ideas Revolution brand new ideas Re-application existing ideas in new light Changing direction new path when old doesn’t work Types?
  • Tasks 1. Asking questions (3 min): Write all questions you can think of, based on the drawing/scene. 2. Product improvement (3 min): List ways to change the toy/game so that children will have more fun playing with it. 3. Unusual uses (3 min): List interesting and unusual uses of a cardboard box. 4. Elaboration (3 min): How many different objects/pictures can you make from the shapes? Title them. Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (1974) (Scoring for : fluency, flexibility, originality, elaboration) Directions: Do not begin until you are told to do so. •Try to think of things that no one else will think of. •Try to think of as many ideas as possible. •Add details to your ideas to make them complete. •If you finish before time is up, you may continue to add details or sit quietly. •Please do not go to the next activity until told to do so.
  • Scoring components: •Fluency – the sheer number of ideas •Originality – the statistical infrequency of response •Flexibility - the degree of difference in the responses, i.e. whether the responses come from a single domain or multiple domains, and the variety of categories of relevant responses. •Elaboration - the amount of detail in the response Guilford’s Alternative Uses Task (1967) List as many possible uses for a common household item (such as s brick, a paperclip, a newspaper)