Warning!Modelling effective mobile learning is infectious. Invited presentation for the UCISA Good Practice event (Jan 14)
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Warning!Modelling effective mobile learning is infectious. Invited presentation for the UCISA Good Practice event (Jan 14)

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Warning!Modelling effective mobile learning is infectious. Invited presentation for the UCISA Good Practice event (Jan 14) Warning!Modelling effective mobile learning is infectious. Invited presentation for the UCISA Good Practice event (Jan 14) Presentation Transcript

  • Good Practice Event Effective use of mobile technologies to enhance learning, teaching and assessment, 23 January 2014, Imperial College London Warning! Modelling effective mobile learning is infectious, an example from Higher Education Chrissi Nerantzi, Academic Developer, Manchester Metropolitan University Juliette Wilson, Graduate Teaching Student, University of Salford Nadine Munro, Graduate Teaching Student, University of Salford Gemma Lace-Costigan, Lecturer, University of Salford Neil Currie, Lecturer, University of Salford
  • first things first! If you have a smart phone or tablet with you, please download the free Socrative app (student version) now! Available for Apple and Android devices ;) Student version!!!
  • ILOs By the end of this presentation, delegates will have had the opportunity to: • Explore the benefits and challenges of mobile learning • Discuss the mobile learning approach used within a teacher development programme in HE • Identify opportunities to embed new mobile learning features into own practice
  • contextualising
  • Universities are spaces to.... • sustain conversations • shape the future of human life • stimulate innovation • shape new structures of and for learning • shape new pedagogies from ECEL2011 keynote by Prof. Anne Boddington, Dean of the Faculty of Arts, University of Brighton innovation freedom the participatory web opening-up
  • change agents Neame (2011) Academic Developers work with people, communities, networks Gibbs (2013) Academic Development to lead innovation and influence change Roche (2010) Academic Developers are Browne Report (2010) in HE Teaching qualification for all staff teaching UK Quality Code (2012) and European Commission (2013) Initial and ongoing Development of Teachers essential Gibbs (2010, 2012) ; Parsons et al (2012) Impact of teaching qualifications on practice Teacher Development programmes to use open and joined up approaches that foster collaborative learning Ryan & Tilbury (2013) Flexible pedagogies to be modelled in Academic Development European Commission (2013) provision 2014: Still the case? Donnelly (2010) technologies are under-used in Academic Development
  • “Technology doesn’t enhance learning in the same way cutlery doesn’t enhance the food we eat.” Prof. Glynis Cousin “Good use of technology is when you don’t notice it” FDOL132 participant
  • Explore the benefits and challenges of mobile learning
  • Let’s try this together! Access your (brand new) socrative app and type in room: chrissinerantzi Now add your thoughts around the benefits and/or challenges of mobile learning
  • Discuss the mobile learning approach used within a teacher development programme in HE
  • where we should measure impact seed-> tree>apples>apple trees core sep11: 32 participants/3448 students 108 students/per participant plus impact on colleagues!!!
  • Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP) • • • • • • • • the programme blended core and optional modules multi-disciplinary Teaching qualification in HE accreditation HEA, NMC greenhouse for active experimentation BYOD
  • Stories in a story
  • access on the go: LTHE site http://learningandteachinghe.wordpress.com/
  • Discussing and supporting: Google + community https://plus.google.com/communities/112186086573392653278
  • Capturing learning: PGCAP portfolios
  • Sharing and connecting: tweet-tweet https://twitter.com/pgcap
  • Visual learning: YouTube http://www.youtube.com/user/pgcapsalford/videos
  • learning through games
  • learning students’ names
  • • • new to downloading apps Socrative app > the ‘quiz’ term was problematic Game worked better, increased engagement also used to collect student feedback on teaching • • Juliette @juliettephd • • • • • experienced with digital technologies media-rich learning using WordPress on the go ‘always on’ > support network (commenting and feedback) community formation Collaborative content creation Neil @asbo_allstar • • • • • • • Twitter to connect with each other, information exchange speedy connection via smart devices valued connections with the wider community and more experienced colleagues organising Twitterchats using hashtags with own students, student-led!!! Students were apprehensive about using Twitter for their learning YouTube and video creation to catch up Nadine stated: “Social media fostered inclusivity” Nadine @neddy4291 Gemma @gemmalace • • • • had a Twitter account before joining Twitter > communication with students students relactant to respond/share introduced Facebook group > observed more exchange 4 stories
  • Juliette’s story @juliettephd • • • • new to downloading apps Socrative app > the ‘quiz’ term was problematic Game worked better, increased engagement also used to collect student feedback on teaching
  • Neil’s story @asbo_allstar • • • • • experienced with digital technologies media-rich learning using WordPress on the go ‘always on’ > support network (commenting and feedback) community formation Collaborative content creation
  • Nadine’s story @neddy4291 • • • • • Twitter to connect with each other, information exchange speedy connection via smart devices valued connections with the wider community and more experienced colleagues organising Twitterchats using hashtags with own students, student-led!!! Students were apprehensive about using Twitter for their learning • • YouTube and video creation to catch up Nadine stated: “Social media fostered inclusivity”
  • Gemma’s story @gemmalace • • • • had a Twitter account before joining Twitter > communication with students students reluctant to respond/share introduced Facebook group > observed more exchange
  • evaluation – asynchronous focus group sharing stories (via Google doc) – portfolio-based reflections (Wordpress) – observational data (blended classroom)
  • I was astounded by the breadth of knowledge made available to me via Twitter and I found the networks I made invaluable in aiding my own learning with respect to the PGCAP, but also I found it an excellent source of motivation and inspiration with respect to influencing my own teaching practice. Following “game week” each learner was filmed selling their ideas and their peers were able to access the clips and vote for a winning idea. I was not able to participate in person and so the use of Youtube meant I was still able to contribute my ideas and compete in the activity. I think the motivation to still participate came from the ease at which inclusivity can be fostered through social media and particularly where mobile devices are utilised. The ability to engage with my peer group while not being physically present gave me a greater sense of involvement in the process. Two issues quickly became clear. Firstly, not everyone had a smart device or people had difficulty with the technology. To overcome this issue I ensured that the Socrative activities were suited to pair or group work, and an unexpected outcome of this was that it fostered more collaborative student engagement; it got students working together. Secondly, the framing of the activity was very important for example, when I initially introduced the activity as a ‘quiz’ it put many students off attending. The benefit of having an ‘always on’ connection that a smart device presents, directly linked to their Wordpress blogs gives instant notifications as users comment on content. The ability to be alerted immediately not only encourages the revisiting of previously written articles to aid personal reflection, but also encourages the students to reciprocate and provide feedback to their peers, building a peer support network. Voices
  • I was astounded by the breadth of knowledge made available to me via Twitter and I found the networks I made invaluable in aiding my own learning with respect to the PGCAP, but also I found it an excellent source of motivation and inspiration with respect to influencing my own teaching practice. Voices
  • Following “game week” each learner was filmed selling their ideas and their peers were able to access the clips and vote for a winning idea. I was not able to participate in person and so the use of Youtube meant I was still able to contribute my ideas and compete in the activity. I think the motivation to still participate came from the ease at which inclusivity can be fostered through social media and particularly where mobile devices are utilised. The ability to engage with my peer group while not being physically present gave me a greater sense of involvement in the process. Voices
  • Two issues quickly became clear. Firstly, not everyone had a smart device or people had difficulty with the technology. To overcome this issue I ensured that the Socrative activities were suited to pair or group work, and an unexpected outcome of this was that it fostered more collaborative student engagement; it got students working together. Secondly, the framing of the activity was very important for example, when I initially introduced the activity as a ‘quiz’ it put many students off attending. Voices
  • The benefit of having an ‘always on’ connection that a smart device presents, directly linked to their Wordpress blogs gives instant notifications as users comment on content. The ability to be alerted immediately not only encourages the revisiting of previously written articles to aid personal reflection, but also encourages the students to reciprocate and provide feedback to their peers, building a peer support network. Voices
  • Benefits • • • • • • • • Integrated approach increased confidence progressively Increased connectivity and connectedness Helped the formation of a learning community Students’ opened up more, shared more Peer-to-peer support, learning and collaboration increased Increased curiosity to explore and actively experiment Resourceful use of existing technologies Teaching practices started changing
  • Challenges • • • • • Using own devices for Learning and Teaching new concept Technological barriers Support issues Always ‘switched on’ - mismatch of expectations Social media addiction?
  • So did modelling infect?
  • Identify opportunities to embed new mobile learning features into own practice
  • “We need to stop seeing the curriculum as a predictable, ordered and manageable space, but instead review it as an important site of transformation characterised by risk and Prof. Maggi Savin-Baden, Prof of Higher Education Research, uncertainty” Coventry University, 2011 ECEL2011 contribution
  • #BYOD4L open course starts on the 10 February 14! http://byod4learning.wordpress.com/
  • References Anderson, T. and Elloumi, F. (2004) ‘Introduction’, in: Anderson, T. and Elloumi (eds.) Theory and Practice of Online Learning. Canada: Athabasca University, pp. xii-xxiv. Browne Report (2010) Securing a sustainable future for higher education, Department for Employment and Learning, available at http://www.delni.gov.uk/index/publications/pubs-higher-education/browne-report-student-fees.htm [accessed 1 November 2013] Donnelly, R. (2010). Harmonizing technology with interaction in blended problem-based learning. Computers & Education, 54(2), pp. 350-359. European Commission (2013) High Level Group on the Modernisation of Higher Education. Report to the European Commission on Improving the quality of teaching and learning in Europe’s higher education institutions, European Union, available at http://ec.europa.eu/education/highereducation/doc/modernisation_en.pdf [accessed 21 November 2013] Gibbs, G. (2013) Reflections on the changing nature of educational development. International Journal for Academic Development, V. 18, Number 1, March 2013, pp. 4-14. Gibbs, G. (2012) Implications of ‘Dimensions of quality’ in a market environment, York: The Higher Education Academy, available at http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/assets/documents/evidence_informed_practice/HEA_Dimensions_of_Quality_2.pdf Gibbs, G. (2010) Dimensions of quality, York: The Higher Education Academy, available at http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/assets/documents/evidence_informed_practice/Dimensions_of_Quality.pdf [accessed 8 November 2013] Goldstein, S. R. (1976) The asserted constitutional right of public school teachers to determine what they teach, University of Pennsylvania Law Review, 124, 1293-357. Metzger, W. (1987) ‘Profession and constitution: two definitions of academic freefom in America’, Texas Law Review, 1265-322. Neame, C. (2011) Exploring Models of Development of Professional Practice in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: What Can We Learn from Biology and Marketing? Educate~ Vol. 11, No. 1, 2011, pp. 9-19. Nerantzi, C, Wilson, J, Munro, N, Lace-Costigan, G and Currie N (2014) Warning! Modelling effective mobile learning is infectious, an example from Higher Education, UCISA. Roche, V. (2003) Being an agent of change, in: Kahn, P. and Baume, D. (eds.) A guide to Staff & Educational Development, Oxon: Routledge, pp. 171-191. Ryan, A. & Tilbury, D. (2013) Flexible Pedagogies, new pedagogical ideas, York: HEA, available at ttp://www.heacademy.ac.uk/news/detail/2013/new_pedagogical_ideas [accessed 21 November 2013] The UK Quality Code for Higher Eduction (2012) Glouchester: Quality Assurance Agency, available at http://www.qaa.ac.uk/Publications/InformationAndGuidance/Pages/quality-code-brief-guide.aspx [accessed 5 December 2013] Wiley, D. and Hilton, J. (2009) Openness, Dynamic Specialization, and the Disaggregated Future of Higher Education, in: International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, Volume 10, Number 5, 2009, pp. 1-16., available at http://www.irrodl.org/index.php/irrodl/article/view/768 [accessed 25 February 2013]
  • Warning! Modelling effective mobile learning is infectious, an example from Higher Education by Chrissi Nerantzi, Juliette Wilson, Nadine Munro, Gemma Lace-Costigan & Neil Currie will be included in the Best Practice Guide in the use of mobile technology to enhance learning, teaching and assessment 2014
  • Get in touch with us Warning! Modelling effective mobile learning is infectious, an example from Higher Education Chrissi Nerantzi, Academic Developer, Manchester Metropolitan University, @chrissinerantzi Juliette Wilson, Graduate Teaching Student, University of Salford, @juliettephd Nadine Munro, Graduate Teaching Student, University of Salford, @neddy4291 Gemma Lace-Costigan, Lecturer, University of Salford, @gemmalace Neil Currie, Lecturer, University of Salford, @asbo_allstar