Page 1 of 19
STOIC and CHAMPS Training
for Communities in Schools After school Centers on Education in Denton ISD
Presente...
Page 2 of 19
In my CHAMPS, I referenced VOICE Level 2.
 0 – no talking, no sound
 1 – whisper (no vocal chords when you ...
Page 3 of 19
CDirective
IOTS
noun
1. Tending t o remain unemot ional, especially
showing admirable pat ience and endurance...
Page 4 of 19
Structuring the environment for success
you want to have the students “default” to doing the right thing.
sch...
Page 5 of 19
Teaching, observing, interacting . . .
Correcting
Page 6 of 19
Q: Who said?
“The children of today now love luxury. They have bad manners. They
show disrespect to adults, a...
Page 7 of 19
Conditions Set the
Stage for
(Antecedents) An Individual’s
Behavior
(The Behavior)
Pleasant
Outcomes which
in...
Page 8 of 19
What is most valuable to you?
Increase value
• Build positive relationships
with students by increasing
nonco...
Page 9 of 19
 Guidelines
o Broad, noble ideas
o Attitudes and traits that will help students succeed
o Schoolwide
 Rules...
Page 10 of 19
Organizing all classroom settings for
success.
– Physical arrangements
– Scheduling issues
– Organizational ...
Page 11 of 19
TS
Teach
Page 12 of 19
Teach your expectations
Observe/Monitor
Provide Feedback
Repeat! Again and again.
What about those who come ...
Page 13 of 19
OTS
Observe
Lifeguards are constantly visually scanning, listening, and circulating.
Page 14 of 19
Interact
IOTS
Strategies to increase noncontingent attention:
• Greet students.
• Show an Interest in studen...
Page 15 of 19
We often think of feedback as either positive…
… or negative.
But really it’s more like a pottery wheel.
Page 16 of 19
Accurate
Specific and descriptive
Contingent
Age-appropriate
Given immediately
Given in a manner
that fits y...
Page 17 of 19
What should be the biggest reinforcer in the room? Attention. The leader.
The leader’s attention. Conductor
...
Page 18 of 19
Correct
CDirective
IOTS
You need to know: It is not the severity that makes a consequence
powerful; it is th...
Page 19 of 19
TOUGH kids behavior chains:
 Learn to identify the behavior links
 Don’t hold back or wait
 Use your prep...
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STOIC and CHAMPS for 21st Century CLC ACE Participant Handouts

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STOIC and CHAMPS for 21st Century CLC ACE Participant Handouts

  1. 1. Page 1 of 19 STOIC and CHAMPS Training for Communities in Schools After school Centers on Education in Denton ISD Presented by Rene Shelton and Chris Shade There are two “things” we want you to get from this session… Thing 1 is a basic understanding of Thing 2 and Thing 2 is a management plan for activities and transitions after school. Conversation: Limit your comments to those near you. Voice Level up to 2. Put your phones on silent or vibrate. If you must answer, please move your conversation outside of this room. Help: Raise your hand and call out if you have questions or a comment. Activity: Introduction to CHAMPS; GOAL: An after school plan Movement: Take care of your needs. Participation: Engaged in learning and applying the things we talk about nodding your head once in awhile, taking notes is good; better – completing the Management Plan sections as we go through them. Signal: To bring you back to “Big Group.” Success: We’ll review these at the end to see how we did. To help us be productive, we will follow these CHAMP expectations. Conversation: Limit your comments to those near you. Voice Level up to 2. Put your phones on silent or vibrate. If you must answer, please move your conversation outside of this room. Help: Raise your hand and call out if you have questions or a comment. Activity: Introduction to CHAMPS; GOAL: An after school plan Movement: Take care of your needs. Participation: Engaged in learning and applying the things we talk about nodding your head once in a while, taking notes is good; better – completing the Management Plan sections as we go through them. Signal: To bring you back to “Big Group.” Success: We’ll review these at the end to see how we did.
  2. 2. Page 2 of 19 In my CHAMPS, I referenced VOICE Level 2.  0 – no talking, no sound  1 – whisper (no vocal chords when you use Voice Level 1  2 – Quiet Conversation (vocal chords in use; only those right around you can hear you)  3 – Presentational Voice – all in the room can hear  4 – Outside – All in the building can hear – This is for outside. Only exception MIGHT be PE and only with Coaches permission  Yelling – Voice Level 4 AND words  Screaming – Voice Level 4 WITHOUT words o In emergency – Yell (use your words), don’t just scream During our CHAMPS, I introduced you to the attention signal that is taught in the CHAMPS book. It has all the components of a good attention signal –  portable  visual  auditory  a ripple effect. It also has a time expectation. Several of the elementary campuses have developed attention signals that are related to their mascots. Since I don’t know them all I can’t teach them to you. You may still here the “Give me 5” or other attention signals – all are acceptable, as long as they have been taught to the students, demonstrated, practiced, and there is feedback about whether the students met the expectation or not. Why is a common signal important throughout the building?  any adult can use  important during safety issues or to control the noise of a large group
  3. 3. Page 3 of 19 CDirective IOTS noun 1. Tending t o remain unemot ional, especially showing admirable pat ience and endurance in t heface of adversit y. sto·ic ˈstō-ik/ noun 1. Tending to remain unemotional, especially showing admirable patience and endurance in the face of adversity. The STOIC “magic” question…What are the variables I can manipulate to get the behavior I want?
  4. 4. Page 4 of 19 Structuring the environment for success you want to have the students “default” to doing the right thing. schedules, seating arrangements, traffic flow, what you have on the walls and boards, routines for beginning the class and ending the class, procedures for turning in homework or assignments, how you will get their attention Teaching expectations about how to be successful within the structure. I do We do You do. If students know what you expect, they don’t have to “discover” it. Observing – monitoring. Interaction – building relationships. Correcting – consistency is the key (Random reinforcement schedule is the most powerful – you never know when you will “win”); business like, watching your tone and facial expressions. More disappointed than angry. Privately. How can I help you?
  5. 5. Page 5 of 19 Teaching, observing, interacting . . . Correcting
  6. 6. Page 6 of 19 Q: Who said? “The children of today now love luxury. They have bad manners. They show disrespect to adults, and love to talk rather than work or exercise. They contradict their parents, chatter in front of company, gobble down their food at the table, and intimidate their teachers.” A: Socrates Let’s imagine… Most human behavior is learned • It can be unlearned…and shaped People are constantly engaged in learning • Every experience influences what follows BEHAVIOR OCCURS FOR A REASON!
  7. 7. Page 7 of 19 Conditions Set the Stage for (Antecedents) An Individual’s Behavior (The Behavior) Pleasant Outcomes which increase likelihood of the behavior in the future Unpleasant Outcomes which reduce likelihood of the behavior in the future ABCs Antecedent – what happens right before the behavior Behavior Consequences – what happens right after the behavior $100 for anyone who can recite the first 100 digits of Pi – right now – from memory. Two Factors That Affect Motivation Value The degree to which one values the rewards that accompany succeeding at that task Expectancy The degree to which an individual expects to be successful at the task V X E = M
  8. 8. Page 8 of 19 What is most valuable to you? Increase value • Build positive relationships with students by increasing noncontingent attention. • Provide positive feedback to students • Providing Intermittent celebrations • Strive to provide a high ratio of positive interactions Increase value  Build positive relationships with students by increasing noncontingent attention.  Provide positive feedback to students  Providing Intermittent celebrations  Strive to provide a high ratio of positive interactions Structure S
  9. 9. Page 9 of 19  Guidelines o Broad, noble ideas o Attitudes and traits that will help students succeed o Schoolwide  Rules o Observable, measurable, well-defined o Unchanging o Do, rather than Don’t o Simply stated o About 5 o POSTED! Tough Kids and Rules  Behavioral Excesses: o Non compliance o Aggression (starting with verbal)  Behavioral Deficits: o Self-Management Skills o Social Skills o Academic Skills Let’s put it on Paper • Guidelines for Success • Rules – Remember the guidelines about rules • Attention Signal – Your campus may have one – You might have an additional one for your room
  10. 10. Page 10 of 19 Organizing all classroom settings for success. – Physical arrangements – Scheduling issues – Organizational patterns – Routines and procedures – Expectations for students • Activities – whole group instruction – independent seat work – cooperative groups – taking tests • Transitions – from one activity to another – from one place to another Physical environment— easy access within 3-4 steps, arrangement of desks, reference materials, etc. Scheduling — how much time per activity, when do we do things. Organizational Patterns — how you handle tardies, late work, tracking grades, etc. Routines, procedures —opening routines, ending routines, managing student work, etc. Expectations for students - —what behavior should look like and sound during key classroom activities and transitions. Create CHAMPS activity plans for at least
  11. 11. Page 11 of 19 TS Teach
  12. 12. Page 12 of 19 Teach your expectations Observe/Monitor Provide Feedback Repeat! Again and again. What about those who come into the program later?  Teach the student individually  Use a buddy system  Reteach the entire class  Make a "Welcome to Our Class" video  Establish a schoolwide Newcomers Club What about time lapse? Emphasize for the first three weeks of the program and/or until 85% get it. Reemphasize before and after [long] holidays.
  13. 13. Page 13 of 19 OTS Observe Lifeguards are constantly visually scanning, listening, and circulating.
  14. 14. Page 14 of 19 Interact IOTS Strategies to increase noncontingent attention: • Greet students. • Show an Interest in student’s work. • Invite students to ask for assistance. • Have a conversation with a student or a group of students. • Make a special effort to greet or talk to students you’ve recently interacted with in regards to a misbehavior.
  15. 15. Page 15 of 19 We often think of feedback as either positive… … or negative. But really it’s more like a pottery wheel.
  16. 16. Page 16 of 19 Accurate Specific and descriptive Contingent Age-appropriate Given immediately Given in a manner that fits your style Feedback is  Accurate  Specific and description  Contingent  Age-appropriate  Given immediately  Given in a manner that fits your style The behavior you reinforce with attention is the behavior that you will begin to see more often. HOW TO Avoid The Criticism Trap: Have MORE interactions with students when they are BEHAVING RESPONSIBLY than when they are misbehaving. Suggestions – Remind yourself you own 3+ to that student Provide feedback at specific times At the end of the day, note who had a rough day, put a note on your plan book for the next day to pump up the positive Engage in lots of appropriate non-contingent interaction
  17. 17. Page 17 of 19 What should be the biggest reinforcer in the room? Attention. The leader. The leader’s attention. Conductor Like the bank, you’ve got to put in more deposits than withdrawals. The Evidence of its Power! Students tend to WORK MORE DILIGENTLY when they receive higher rates of positive feedback than when they do not.
  18. 18. Page 18 of 19 Correct CDirective IOTS You need to know: It is not the severity that makes a consequence powerful; it is the certainty. Consequences don’t have to be big to be powerful – you just have to be consistent in your application of them. Think about this . . . If you go too big with your consequences, you have nothing else bigger to use if you need it. And if you go too big, your student have nothing to lose by acting like complete fools. Don’t paint yourselves into a corner.
  19. 19. Page 19 of 19 TOUGH kids behavior chains:  Learn to identify the behavior links  Don’t hold back or wait  Use your preplanned consequences  Don’t make deals, negotiate with or attempt to placate as these can make the behavior worse Questions For questions, contact Rene Shelton, Denton ISD Elementary Counselor Coordinator at rshelton@dentonisd.org or (940) 369-0595 or Chris Shade, Director of School Improvement and Support at cshade@dentonisd.org or (940) 369-0676.

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