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    Real children. real parents. real places. real parent involvement. handout Real children. real parents. real places. real parent involvement. handout Document Transcript

    • Page 1 of 17Real Parents. Real Kids. Real Places. Real Parent Involvement. Handout2013 Spring ACET Conference Presentation on May 9 at 2 PM by Chris Shade, Mike Mattingly, and Emily RodenThe Denton community came together in force to form a preschool coalitionmade up of agencies (Denton ISD, United Way, City of Denton, the localuniversities (UNT, TWU), churches, volunteers, etc.) to reach children ofpoverty before they entered school by engaging parents through an online andsmartphone based parent engagement resource that teaches and modelssimple, easy to implement parent-child engagement activities using realparents, real kids, in real places, in real engagement. Harnessing the fact thatover 90% of parents of 0-6 year old children across economic levels are onlineat least once a day in Texas (ResearchNow, 2012), hear out how thecommunity came together to form the partnership and how Ready Rosie isalready reached hundreds of families door-to-door through citywide volunteerefforts and events.In the past decade, and especially in the past few years, a disparatecongregation of economist, educators, psychologists, and neuroscientists havebegun to produce evidence that calls into question many of the assumptionsbehind the cognitive hypothesis (the belief that success today dependsprimarily on cognitive skills – the kind of intelligence that gets measure on IQtests, including the abilities to recognize letters and words, to calculate, todetect patterns – and the best way to develop these skills is to practice themas much as possible, beginning as early as possible). What matters most in achild’s development, they say, is not how much information we can stuff intoher brain in the first few years. What matters, instead, is whether we are ableto help her develop a very different set of qualities, a list that includespersistence, self-control, curiosity, conscientiousness, grit, and self-confidence.Economists refer to these as noncognitive skills, psychologists call thempersonality traits, and the rest of us think of them as character.From How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power ofCharacter by Paul Tough (Sep 4, 2012)
    • Page 2 of 17Until recently, though, there has never been a serious attempt to use the toolsof science to peel back the mysteries of childhood, to trace, throughexperiment and analysis, how the experiences of our early years connect tooutcomes in adulthood. That is changing, with the efforts of this newgeneration of researchers. The premise behind the work is simple, if radical:We haven’t managed to solve these problems because we’ve been looking forsolutions in the wrong places. If we want to improve the odds for children ingeneral, and for poor children in particular, we need to approach childhoodanew, to start over with some fundamental questions about how parentsaffect their children; how human skills develop; how character is formed.From How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power ofCharacter by Paul Tough (Sep 4, 2012)Much of the new information about childhood and poverty uncovered bypsychologists and neuroscientist can be daunting to anyone trying to improveoutcomes for disadvantaged children. We now know that early stress andadversity can literally get under a child’s skin, where it can cause damage thatlasts a lifetime. But there is also some positive news in this research. It turnsout that there is a particularly effective antidote to the ill effects of earlystress, and it comes not from pharmaceutical companies or early-childhoodeducators but from parents. Parents and other caregivers who are able to formclose, nurturing relationships with their children can foster resilience in themthat protects them from many of the worst effects of a harsh earlyenvironment. This message can sound a both warm and fuzzy, but it is rootedin cold, hard science. The effect of good parenting is not just emotional orpsychological, the neuroscientists say; it is biochemical.From How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power ofCharacter by Paul Tough (Sep 4, 2012)From How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character by Paul ToughMuch of the new information about childhood and poverty uncovered bypsychologists and neuroscientist can be daunting to anyone trying to improveoutcomes for disadvantaged children. We now know that early stress andadversity can literally get under a child’s skin, where it can cause damage thatlasts a lifetime. But there is also some positive news in this research. It turnsout that there is a particularly effective antidote to the ill effects of earlystress, and it comes not from pharmaceutical companies or early-childhoodeducators but from parents. Parents and other caregivers who are able to formclose, nurturing relationships with their children can foster resilience in themthat protects them from many of the worst effects of a harsh earlyenvironment. This message can sound a both warm and fuzzy, but it is rootedin cold, hard science. The effect of good parenting is not just emotional orpsychological, the neuroscientists say; it is biochemical.From How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power ofCharacter by Paul Tough (Sep 4, 2012)
    • Page 3 of 17Much of the new information about childhood and poverty uncovered bypsychologists and neuroscientist can be daunting to anyone trying to improveoutcomes for disadvantaged children. We now know that early stress andadversity can literally get under a child’s skin, where it can cause damage thatlasts a lifetime. But there is also some positive news in this research. It turnsout that there is a particularly effective antidote to the ill effects of earlystress, and it comes not from pharmaceutical companies or early-childhoodeducators but from parents. Parents and other caregivers who are able to formclose, nurturing relationships with their children can foster resilience in themthat protects them from many of the worst effects of a harsh earlyenvironment. This message can sound a both warm and fuzzy, but it is rootedin cold, hard science. The effect of good parenting is not just emotional orpsychological, the neuroscientists say; it is biochemical.From How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power ofCharacter by Paul Tough (Sep 4, 2012)Gary Evans, [a] Cornell scientist, found the higher the environmental –riskscore, the higher the allostatic- load score—unless a child’s mother wasparticularly responsive to her child. If that was the case, the effect of all ofthose environmental stressors, from overcrowding to poverty to familyturmoil, was almost entirely eliminated. If your mom was particularly sensitiveto your emotional state during a game of Jenga, in other words, all the badstuff you faced in life had little to no effect on your allostatic load. (Note:Environmental risks include family turmoil and chaos and crowding, etc. Thesehave a big effect on children’s cortisol levels. Allostatic load is the gradualprocess of the body’s stress-management systems breaking down under strain[of stress].) When we consider the impact of parenting on children, we tend tothink that the dramatic effects are going to appear at one end or the other ofthe parenting-quality spectrum. A child who is physically abused is going tofare far worse, we assume, than a child who is simply ignored or discouraged.And the child of a supermom who gets lots of extra tutoring and one-on-onesupport is going to do way better than an average well-loved child. But whatBlair’s and Evan’s research suggests is that regular good parenting – beinghelpful and attentive during a game of Jenga – can make a profound difference
    • Page 4 of 17for a child’s future prospects.From How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power ofCharacter by Paul Tough (Sep 4, 2012)From Teaching with Poverty in Mind: What Being Poor Does to Kids Brains and What SchoolsCan Do about It by Eric JensenEmotional needs include attunement (parents reactiveness to their childrensemotions); attachment (safe, trustworthy relationships which builds faith inothers); and emotional punctuation (to help the brain identify what’s correct,positive and worth saving).From Teaching with Poverty in Mind: What Being Poor Does to Kids Brainsand What Schools Can Do about It by Eric Jensen (Nov 19, 2009)Kids from poverty get less attunement time. Attunement is the establishmentof a positive, reciprocal, relationship with the primary caregiver. This qualitytime provides the basis for learning the non hardwired socially appropriateemotions.From Teaching with Poverty in Mind: What Being Poor Does to Kids Brainsand What Schools Can Do about It by Eric Jensen (Nov 19, 2009)
    • Page 5 of 17Emotional needs include attunement (parents reactiveness to their childrensemotions); attachment (safe, trustworthy relationships which builds faith inothers); and emotional punctuation (to help the brain identify what’s correct,positive and worth saving).From Teaching with Poverty in Mind: What Being Poor Does to Kids Brainsand What Schools Can Do about It by Eric Jensen (Nov 19, 2009)Recent evidence (Harris, 2006) suggests that the complex web of socialrelationships students experience—with peers, adults in the school, and familymembers—exerts a much greater influence on their behavior than researcherspreviously assumed. This process starts with students’ core relationships withparents or primary caregivers in their lives, which form a personality that iseither secure and attached or insecure and unattached. Securely attachedchildren typically behave better in school (Blair et al., 2008)From Teaching with Poverty in Mind: What Being Poor Does to Kids Brainsand What Schools Can Do about It by Eric Jensen (Nov 19, 2009)Beginning at birth, the attachment formed between parent and child predictsthe quality of future relationships with teachers and peers (Szweczyk-Sokolowski, Bost, & Wainwright, 2005) and plays a leading role in thedevelopment of such social functions as curiosity, arousal, emotionalregulation, independence, and social competence (Sroufe, 2005).From Teaching with Poverty in Mind: What Being Poor Does to Kids Brainsand What Schools Can Do about It by Eric Jensen (Nov 19, 2009)
    • Page 6 of 17From Teaching with Poverty in Mind: What Being Poor Does to Kids Brainsand What Schools Can Do about It by Eric Jensen (Nov 19, 2009)To grow up emotionally healthy, children need• A strong, reliable primary caregiver who provides consistent andunconditional love, guidance, and support.• Safe, predictable, stable environments.• Ten to 20 hours each week of harmonious, reciprocal interactions. Thisprocess, known as attunement…helps them develop a wider range ofhealthy emotions including gratitude, forgiveness, and empathy.• Enrichment through personalized, increasingly complex activities.From Teaching with Poverty in Mind: What Being Poor Does to Kids Brainsand What Schools Can Do about It by Eric Jensen (Nov 19, 2009)Deficits in these areas inhibit the production of new brain cells, alter the pathof maturation, and rework the healthy neural circuitry in children’s brains,thereby undermining emotional and social development and predisposingthem to emotional dysfunction.From Teaching with Poverty in Mind: What Being Poor Does to Kids Brainsand What Schools Can Do about It by Eric Jensen (Nov 19, 2009)
    • Page 7 of 17Kids “download” the negatives of chaos, disharmony, poor relationships, foullanguage, poor manners, and weak vocabulary just as quickly and just asautomatically as they would any positive or enrichment input.From ages 0-5, the world is downloaded into the brain. Highly immaturefrontal lobes are unable to delete or reframe any negative input.From Teaching with Poverty in Mind: What Being Poor Does to Kids Brainsand What Schools Can Do about It by Eric Jensen (Nov 19, 2009)Those first few years are critically important in the development of a child’sbrain. But the most significant skills he is acquiring during those years aren’tones that can be taught with flashcards. The most profound discovery this newgeneration of neuroscientists has made is the powerful connection betweenthe infant brain chemistry and adult psychology. Lying deep beneath thosenoble, complex human qualities we call character, these scientists have found,is the mundane, mechanical interaction of specific chemicals in the brains andbodies of developing infants. These scientists have demonstrated that themost reliable way to produce an adult who is brave and curious and kind andprudent is to ensure that when he is an infant, his hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis functions well. And how do you do that? It’s not magic. First, asmuch as possible, you protect him from serious trauma and chronic stress;then, even more important, you provide him with a secure, nurturingrelationship with at least one parent and ideally two. That’s not the wholesecret, but it is a big, big part of it.From Teaching with Poverty in Mind: What Being Poor Does to Kids Brainsand What Schools Can Do about It by Eric Jensen (Nov 19, 2009)
    • Page 8 of 17“We live in a culture of scarcity in a “never ___ enough” world.From Daring Greatly: How the Courage to Be Vulnerable Transforms the WayWe Live, Love, Parent, and Lead by Brené Brown (Sep 11, 2012)Scarcity thrives in a culture where everyone is hyperaware of lack.” But asauthor Brené Brown continues in her book, Daring Greatly, “Who we are andhow we engage with the world are much stronger predictors of how ourchildren will do than what we know about parenting.” Brown does not claim tobe a parenting expert; in fact, she doubts there are any. But she offers wisdomin encouraging parents to “parent from a place of “enough” rather thanscarcity.”Scarcity thrives in a culture where everyone is hyperaware of lack.” But asauthor Brené Brown continues in her book, Daring Greatly, “Who we are andhow we engage with the world are much stronger predictors of how ourchildren will do than what we know about parenting.” Brown does not claim tobe a parenting expert; in fact, she doubts there are any. But she offers wisdomin encouraging parents to “parent from a place of “enough” rather thanscarcity.”
    • Page 9 of 17Simply stated, “You.are.enough.”From The Social Animal: The Hidden Sources of Love, Character, andAchievement by David Brooks (Jan 3, 2012)That seems less complicated. Sometimes, as parents we just need an idea. Aprompt. And that’s what I really like about Ready Rosie. Each day, parentsreceive a two minute video of activities using simple household objects such asrocks and coins. In other videos, it has activities with food such as countingsugar packets or gummy bears. Others take place reading in the floor at thelocal used bookstore or searching for sounds at the store. And it’s real parentsteaching real children in real places like a restaurant, the city bus, the grocerystore, the doctor’s office, the playground, etc. Places where authentic learningoccurs. Since there’s not a parenting how-to manual, sometimes it’s nice justto see how others are doing it.
    • Page 10 of 17That seems less complicated. Sometimes, as parents we just need an idea. Aprompt. And that’s what I really like about Ready Rosie. Each day, parentsreceive a two minute video of activities using simple household objects such asrocks and coins. In other videos, it has activities with food such as countingsugar packets or gummy bears. Others take place reading in the floor at thelocal used bookstore or searching for sounds at the store. And it’s real parentsteaching real children in real places like a restaurant, the city bus, the grocerystore, the doctor’s office, the playground, etc. Places where authentic learningoccurs. Since there’s not a parenting how-to manual, sometimes it’s nice justto see how others are doing it.This is in part why Ready Rosie was created. Founder, educator, and parentEmily Roden said in an article in the Denton Record Chronicle that shestruggled to come up with ideas for teaching her two children and thought aquick video everyday would be an easy way to solve the dilemma. And it is notoverly complex. Videos are sent by email to a smartphone, home computer, orthe public library computer. The video activities come in both English andSpanish. For those interested, each segment also includes an “expert” videoexplaining the “why” behind the activitywww.readyrosie.com
    • Page 11 of 1729250121
    • Page 12 of 17To ensure that our children are prepared for school, Denton IndependentSchool District, United Way of Denton County, and the City of Denton havecreated a “Pre-K Coalition”. Our first effort is the implementation of ReadyRosie, which is an innovative, online school readiness resource that sends adaily email to parents, caregivers, and teachers with a short video of aninteractive activity that can be done with young children to encourage learningfoundational skills. These skills include problem solving and math, foundationsof literacy, essential life skills, and vocabulary. The program is designed toteach adults how to affectively engage their children in learning in everyenvironment.The first phase of this effort was to connect with families near the fiveelementary schools with the highest percentages of poverty.The United Way of Denton County Community Needs Assessment indicatedthat one in three students in the Denton County community are at-risk ofdropping out of school. Additionally, there are 8,217 Denton County childrenliving in poverty, with 37% of these children under the age of five. Researchshows that when these children enter school, they are behind in basic butcritical skills, such as reading, math and vocabulary. Access to quality pre-school education has been proven to have long term effects on studentsincluding increased graduation rates, and decreases in behavior problems,crime, and delinquency.The goals of the coalitions community partners are to increase kindergartenreadiness, provide equal access to parent resources, and to promote lifelonglearning and success.Members of the coalition include:Denton ISDUnited WayCity of Denton (including the mayor and city council members)ParentsDenton Public LibraryUniversity of North TexasDenton ISD Parks and Recreation
    • Page 13 of 17Denton County HousingCity of Denton Community Development CenterUNT Global Leadership ClassDAAEYC/UNTThe Big Event - UNTUpward Bound at UNTWorkforce SolutionThe Village ChurchServe DentonCook Children’s HospitalCommunities in SchoolsFirst United Methodist ChurchFirst Baptist ChurchInterfaith MinistriesChildren’s Advocacy CenterDenton County HousingSoutheast Denton NewsW.I.C.TargetNorth Central Texas CollegeCourt Appointed Special AdvocatesFirst State BankVarious child care centersEtc.School Zone Teams are made up of community volunteers led by United Way.Over 100 volunteers from community organizations are participating.Denton ISD Team strategizes to enroll current young students. Eightdepartments have joined together in this effort.
    • Page 14 of 17Maps of the school boundaries, apartment complexes, and agencies wereprovided so volunteers could target the neighborhoods identified by the fiveelementary schools that the Pre-K Coalition selected. As an example, LeeElementary Schools Spanish-speaking parents, supported by the organizationConcilio, hit the streets in their neighborhood to spread the word about ReadyRosie.Events such as the “Fun Day” held at Rivera ES and sponsored by communityagencies and volunteers from UNT were a hit!
    • Page 15 of 17Posters were hung in each campus that receives Title I and thetwo district schools for young children as well as across the city.Students wore “stickers” home to alert parents of theopportunity to enroll.Ready Rosie is featured on the front page of the Denton ISD website atwww.dentonisd.org.
    • Page 16 of 17cshade@dentonisd.org  www.dentonisd.org/federalprogramsmmattingly@dentonisd.org  www.dentonisd.org/eroden@readyrosie.com  www.readyrosie.comCONTACT INFOChris Shade, Director of School Improvement and SupportDenton ISD PDC 1212 Bolivar Street Denton, TX 76226 (940) 369-0676cshade@dentonisd.org www.dentonisd.org/federalprogramsMike Mattingly, Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum and InstructionDenton ISD PDC 1212 Bolivar Street Denton, TX 76226 (940) 369-0699mmattingly@dentonisd.org www.dentonisd.org/Emily Roden, Ready Rosieeroden@readyrosie.com www.readyrosie.comReady Rosie is a program paid by Denton ISD through its Title I,Part A funds for parents of current and potential Denton ISDstudents at no charge. The program is designed to serve studentsfrom birth to age six. Funding meets the requirement to addressthe needs of preschool children through section II.D. of the Title I,Part A “Assurances Relating to the Title I Program Plan” guidanceand the needs of parental involvement through section VI.A. ofthe Title I, Part A “Assurances Relating to Parental Involvement”guidance.II. Assurances Relating to the Title I Program PlanThe LEA assures the following:D. The LEA will coordinate and integrate Title I, Part A, serviceswith other educational services at the LEA or individual campuslevel, such as Even Start, Head Start, Reading First, Early ReadingFirst, and other preschool programs, including plans for thetransition of participants in such programs to local elementaryschool programs and services for children with limited Englishproficiency; children with disabilities; migratory children;neglected or delinquent youth; Indian children served under ofTitle VII, Part A; homeless children; and immigrant children inorder to increase program effectiveness, eliminate duplication,and reduce fragmentation of the instructional program. [P.L. 107–110, Section 1112(b)(1)(E)]”
    • Page 17 of 17VI. Assurances Relating to Parental Involvement.The LEA assures the following:A. If the LEA’s Title I, Part A, entitlement is more than $500,000,the LEA shall reserve at least 1% of its Title I, Part A, entitlementfor parental involvement activities, including promoting familyliteracy and parenting skills.J. To ensure effective involvement of parents and to support apartnership among the campus involved, parents, and thecommunity to improve student academic achievement, eachcampus and the LEA will do the following:ii. Provide materials and training, such as literacy training andusing technology, to help parents work with their children toimprove their achievement, as appropriate, to foster parentalinvolvementiv. to the extent feasible and appropriate, coordinate andintegrate parent involvement programs and activities with HeadStart, Reading First, Early Reading First, Even Start, the HomeInstruction Programs for Preschool Youngsters, the Parents asTeachers Program, and public preschool and other programs, andconduct other activities, such as parent resource centers, thatencourage and support parents in more fully participating in theeducation of their children