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Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
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Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
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Dining With Diversity Statistics
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Dining With Diversity Statistics
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Dining With Diversity Statistics
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Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
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Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
Dining With Diversity Statistics
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Dining With Diversity Statistics

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This presentation includes statistical …

This presentation includes statistical
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considering people with disabilities
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  • 1. <ul><li>Workforce Diversity Edmonton </li></ul><ul><li>thanks you for attending the </li></ul><ul><li>2009 Dining with Diversity event. </li></ul><ul><li>This presentation includes statistical </li></ul><ul><li>information on the importance of </li></ul><ul><li>considering people with disabilities </li></ul><ul><li>in your business decisions. </li></ul><ul><li>Enjoy. </li></ul>
  • 2. “ People with disabilities want to work for you, and they want to buy your products. With skilled and loyal employees at a premium and traditional market growth slowing, can you afford to ignore or stereotype them?” Quoted in Bill Wilkerson, Business Case for Accessibility , November 2001 Fortune Magazine
  • 3. Percentage of Canadians with Disabilities who are Employed: 51% Percentage of Canadians without Disabilities who are Employed: 75% Statistics Canada 2006 PALS Survey Analytical Paper, July 2008
  • 4. Attitudes and cultural biases within organizations continue to be a barrier against the hiring of persons with disabilities. CCRW Diversity Planning for Inclusive Employment Survey, September 2005
  • 5. People with hearing limitations report the lowest unemployment rate and highest labour force participation rate of all Canadians with Disabilities. Statistics Canada 2006 PALS Survey Analytical Paper, July 2008
  • 6. People with memory and psychological limitations report the highest unemployment rate and lowest labour force participation rate of all Canadians with Disabilities. Statistics Canada 2006 PALS Survey Analytical Paper, July 2008
  • 7. There is a low awareness of and expectation that government or community groups can provide effective support to help organizations deal with sensitivity to issues related to working with persons with disabilities. CCRW Diversity Planning for Inclusive Employment Survey, September 2005
  • 8. “ Canada's maximum disability benefit was lower than any other public disability insurance program in the industrialized world.” Sherri Torjman, The Canada Pension Plan Disability Benefit , 2002
  • 9. The most important single accommodation many organizations need to make concerns attitudes and assumptions. AccessWORKS, “Employment Accomodations for People with Mental Health Challenges”
  • 10. As many as one in four Canadians with disabilities still report that they personally faced discrimination in getting a good education. Alex Stephens, “ Work-related Learning & Labour Market Inclusion”, Abilities Magazine , Winter 2007
  • 11. Crippen by Dave Lupton
  • 12. People with depression will try hardest to mask their illness in the workplace. Fear of being reprimanded, dismissed or stigmatized for feeling &quot;down&quot;, and feelings of shame will prevent someone from seeking help. Canadian Mental Health Association
  • 13. Among unemployed persons with disabilities, 56% say they require some type of work aid or job modification, with job redesign (42%) and modified work hours (35%) being the most commonly cited . Canadian Council on Social Development’s Disability Information Sheet, Number 18, 2005
  • 14. People with mental illness usually have average or above average intelligence. Their abilities vary just as they do for any member of the general population. Mental illness should not be confused with intellectual or cognitive disabilities. Canadian Mental Health Association
  • 15. D epression and ischemic heart disease are on track to become the leading causes of work years lost in the global economy by 2020 through human disability and premature death. Bill Wilkerson, Global Business and Economic Round Table on Addiction and Mental Health
  • 16. Workers without disabilities are more likely than those with disabilities to be able to work from home. (23.6%, compared to 15.9%) Canadian Council on Social Development’s Disability Information Sheet, Number 18, 2005
  • 17. The Management Practices Most Likely to Precipitate or Aggravate Mental Ill Health in the Workforce 1. The imposition of unreasonable demands on subordinates. Bill Wilkerson, Global Business and Economic Round Table on Addiction and Mental Health
  • 18. The Management Practices Most Likely to Precipitate or Aggravate Mental Ill Health in the Workforce 2. Withholding information that is materially important to them to carry out their jobs. Bill Wilkerson, Global Business and Economic Round Table on Addiction and Mental Health
  • 19. The Management Practices Most Likely to Precipitate or Aggravate Mental Ill Health in the Workforce 3. Refusing to give employees reasonable discretion over the day-to-day means and methods of their own work. Bill Wilkerson, Global Business and Economic Round Table on Addiction and Mental Health
  • 20. The Management Practices Most Likely to Precipitate or Aggravate Mental Ill Health in the Workforce 4. Failing to credit or acknowledge the contributions and achievements of employees. Bill Wilkerson, Global Business and Economic Round Table on Addiction and Mental Health
  • 21. Crippen by Dave Lupton
  • 22. “ The present system of disability income is more accurately described as a ‘patchwork’ of uncoordinated programs.” Sherri Torjman, The Canada Pension Plan Disability Benefit , 2002
  • 23. Among people in their early to late 20s who go onto long term disability, 60 % to 70 % never come back to work. Bill Wilkerson, Global Business and Economic Round Table on Addiction and Mental Health
  • 24. The costs of mental illness in the Canadian labour force exceed $33 billion a year in lost production alone. Bill Wilkerson, Global Business and Economic Round Table on Addiction and Mental Health
  • 25. 82% of adults with disabilities have more than one type of disability. In fact, 36% have four or more types. Canadian Council on Social Development’s Disability Information Sheet, Number 19, 2005
  • 26. Among employed persons with disabilities, the greatest rate of unmet need for modified work structures is accessible transportation – 26% of those who require it, don't have it . Canadian Council on Social Development’s Disability Information Sheet, Number 18, 2005
  • 27. The average age of onset in Canada for : Anxiety disorders – age 12 Substance abuse – age 18 Depression – age 23 Bill Wilkerson, Global Business and Economic Round Table on Addiction and Mental Health
  • 28. Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters recently announced its Business Takes Action initiative: challenging Ontario businesses to make people with disabilities 10% of all new hires by 2020. Alex Stephens, “ Work-related Learning & Labour Market Inclusion”, Abilities Magazine , Winter 2007
  • 29. More employed persons with disabilities (30%) require work aids or job modifications, such as modified hours or job redesign, than require structural modifications (15%). Canadian Council on Social Development’s Disability Information Sheet, Number 18, 2005
  • 30. Workers with disabilities are overrepresented in the lowest wage quartile. Canadian Council on Social Development’s Disability Information Sheet, Number 16, 2005
  • 31. Crippen by Dave Lupton
  • 32. Workers without disabilities are more likely to report having flexible work hours than workers with disabilities. (35.5% compared to 29.5%) Canadian Council on Social Development’s Disability Information Sheet, Number 18, 2005
  • 33. People with disabilities most in need of assistive technology – that is, those with the most severe disabilities – are the least likely to have their needs met. Canadian Council on Social Development’s Disability Information Sheet, Number 17, 2005
  • 34. Workers with disabilities are less likely than those without disabilities to have had training of any type. Canadian Council on Social Development’s Disability Information Sheet, Number 16, 2005
  • 35. Workers with disabilities are less likely than those without disabilities to have received a promotion in the previous year. Canadian Council on Social Development’s Disability Information Sheet, Number 16, 2005
  • 36. Workers with disabilities are less likely to supervise others on the job, despite tending to have more work experience. Canadian Council on Social Development’s Disability Information Sheet, Number 16, 2005
  • 37. Persons with disabilities are more likely than those without disabilities to go without food because of a lack of money or eat less than required due to lack of money. Canadian Council on Social Development’s Disability Information Sheet, Number 10, 2003
  • 38. Persons with disabilities are more likely than persons without disabilities to have a regular medical doctor. Canadian Council on Social Development’s Disability Information Sheet, Number 13, 2004
  • 39. Persons with disabilities are about 1.5 times more likely to consult an alternative health care provider than are persons without disabilities. Canadian Council on Social Development’s Disability Information Sheet, Number 13, 2004
  • 40. According to a CNIB study, only 25 per cent of working-age people with vision loss are employed. CNIB, Fast Facts
  • 41. Crippen by Dave Lupton
  • 42. The average return for businesses providing job accommodations was $28.69 for every $1 spent on accommodation. US Job Accommodation Network Data from October 1994 and September 1995. As quoted in CCDS’s Disability Information Sheet, Number 18, 2005
  • 43. Almost half of all adults with vision loss report gross annual incomes of $20,000 or less, regardless of marital or family status. CNIB, Fact Sheet: The Personal and Social Impact of Vision Loss
  • 44. Of the businesses seeking advice on workplace accommodation, the solution for 19% had no cost attached; for another 50%, the cost of accommodation was between $1 and $500. US Job Accommodation Network Data from October 1994 and September 1995. As quoted in CCDS’s Disability Information Sheet, Number 18, 2005
  • 45. Of the businesses seeking advice on workplace accommodation, only 3% reported a cost of more than $5,000. US Job Accommodation Network Data from October 1994 and September 1995. As quoted in CCDS’s Disability Information Sheet, Number 18, 2005
  • 46. 27% of working-age adults with vision loss report that employers do not see their potential, and another 26% indicated that employers are unwilling to hire someone with vision loss. CNIB, Fact Sheet: The Personal and Social Impact of Vision Loss
  • 47. In 2001, just over one million Canadians aged 12 and older were living with diabetes. By 2005, the number had climbed to 1.3 million – an increase of almost 25% in just four years. Canadian Council on Social Development, A Profile of Health in Canada
  • 48. Learning disabilities are not related to intelligence: in fact, many affected individuals have IQ's well above average and often in the superior range. Carol A. McMullen for The Learning Disabilities Association of Canada, When Bright Employees Don’t Measure Up , 2001
  • 49. 70% of Canadians wouldn’t be able to continue working at their present job if they were to lose their vision. CNIB, Fact Sheet: The Personal and Social Impact of Vision Loss
  • 50. In 2002, Alberta had the highest rate of depression in Canada. Canadian Council on Social Development, A Profile of Health in Canada
  • 51. Crippen by Dave Lupton
  • 52. Most people with a disability want to work full time. Canadian Abilities Foundation, Neglected or Hidden: Connecting Employers with People with Disabilities in Canada , May 2004
  • 53. More than 30 years of internal surveys conducted by DuPont consistently show that people with disabilities: <ul><li>Did their jobs well </li></ul><ul><li>Had excellence attendance records </li></ul><ul><li>Were diligent in observing safety standards </li></ul><ul><li>Helped maintain the firm’s competitive position </li></ul>Bill Wilkerson, Business Case for Accessibility , November 2001
  • 54. 61% of respondents indicated that an annual salary of $30,000 or less would be sufficient to entice them in to the workforce. Canadian Abilities Foundation, Neglected or Hidden: Connecting Employers with People with Disabilities in Canada , May 2004
  • 55. 96% of workers seek the advice of those with a different background when solving complex business problems. Leger Marketing survey, quoted in the Edmonton Journal , April 5, 2008
  • 56. “ In the past five years, we’ve definitely seen a much broader awareness of the importance of diversity in the workplace. It’s not just a numbers game and a legislative requirement. It’s about diversity of thought and how that adds to the bottom line.” Quoted in the Edmonton Journal , April 5, 2008 Michael Bach, KPMG
  • 57. More than three million Canadians are unable to read print because of a disability. Less than 5% of published material in Canada is available in multiple formats. CNIB, Fact Sheet: The Personal and Social Impact of Vision Loss
  • 58. Approximately 10 to 15% of the population have some type of learning disability that causes serious problems in school achievement or on the job. Carol A. McMullen for The Learning Disabilities Association of Canada, When Bright Employees Don’t Measure Up , 2001
  • 59. More than 75% of Canadians feel that Canada’s cultural diversity provides a “distinct advantage” in fostering innovation. Leger Marketing survey, quoted in the Edmonton Journal , April 5, 2008
  • 60. “ A diverse workforce is a more engaged one and that ultimately leads to profitability.” Quoted in the Edmonton Journal , April 5, 2008 Michael Bach, KPMG
  • 61. Crippen by Dave Lupton
  • 62. Between 2001 and 2011, the number of working-age Canadians with some form of disability will increase by 1.4 million. Bill Wilkerson, Business Case for Accessibility , November 2001
  • 63. People with disabilities influence the spending decisions of an estimated 12 million to 15 million other Canadians. Bill Wilkerson, Business Case for Accessibility , November 2001
  • 64. HSBC estimates that, worldwide, people over 55 years of age hold around $63 trillion, or about 70% of the planet's wealth. Employer’s Forum on Disability, Realizing Potential
  • 65. Alison M. Konrad, Kaye Leslie & Don Peuramaki , Full Accessibility by 2025, Ivey Business Journal, September/October 2007
  • 66. People with disabilities are a group that has been neglected by the consumer market, although its purchasing power – and the secondary market that it influences – is large and growing. Bill Wilkerson, Business Case for Accessibility , November 2001
  • 67. Persons with disabilities are responsible for an estimated $25 billion in annual consumer buying power in Canada alone. Bill Wilkerson, Business Case for Accessibility , November 2001
  • 68. 77% of Canadian workers feel that diversity in culture and background contributes to innovation and creates a stronger business landscape. Leger Marketing survey, quoted in the Edmonton Journal , April 5, 2008
  • 69. “ The larger picture is that it’s simply good for business in terms of recruitment to be reflective of your community and sensitive to the needs of specific communities.” Quoted in the Edmonton Journal , April 5, 2008 Richard Yerema, Mediacorp
  • 70. Our workforce is aging. As Baby Boomers move through their fifties and begin to retire, the number of young people and immigrants entering the workforce will be insufficient to meet demand. Bill Wilkerson, Business Case for Accessibility , November 2001
  • 71. Crippen by Dave Lupton
  • 72. Persons with disabilities – representing about one-sixth of all Canadians – have an unheralded but established track record of being reliable, productive employees. Bill Wilkerson, Business Case for Accessibility , November 2001
  • 73. The experiences of large corporations such as DuPont and the Royal Bank of Canada show that when business recruits persons with disabilities: <ul><li>The pool of potential employees becomes larger </li></ul><ul><li>Staff retention rates increase </li></ul><ul><li>Absenteeism decreases </li></ul>Bill Wilkerson, Business Case for Accessibility , November 2001
  • 74. Employers who recognize the potential of underutilized talent sources will be at an advantage in the race for talent. Bill Wilkerson, Business Case for Accessibility , November 2001
  • 75. Stereotypes, generalizations and labels are seductively easy to use, but they obscure the singular blend of talents, skills and personality traits of each individual. Bill Wilkerson, Business Case for Accessibility , November 2001
  • 76. The World Health Organization now sees the issue of disability as “a socially created problem” and the full integration of these individuals into society as “an attitudinal or ideological” issue. Bill Wilkerson, Business Case for Accessibility , November 2001
  • 77. A learning disability does not interfere with intellectual ability, but rather the way information is processed. The Learning Disabilities Association of Canada, Myths and Truths , 2005
  • 78. Persons with learning disabilities must overcome discrimination in the promotion process. Often their skills are overlooked and they are considered inadequate rather than as talented, capable persons who may need accommodations to compensate for specific weaknesses. The Learning Disabilities Association of Canada, Myths and Truths , 2005
  • 79. One in six Canadians is likely to seek help for a mental health problem in their lifetime. Canadian Mental Health Association
  • 80. The degree of social inclusion and participation that people with so-called disabilities can achieve is a large factor in determining how disability affects daily life. Bill Wilkerson, Business Case for Accessibility , November 2001
  • 81. dizABLED by John & Claire Lytle
  • 82. 70% of Canadians would not give their eyesight up for anything: not to win the lottery, not to be Prime Minister, not even for a lifetime of great sex. CNIB, Fact Sheet: The Personal and Social Impact of Vision Loss
  • 83. It’s estimated that, globally, there are 600 million people with disabilities. Bill Wilkerson, Business Case for Accessibility , November 2001
  • 84. Learning disabilities are lifelong. They don't go away nor can they be cured, but people can and do learn to effectively cope with them. The Learning Disabilities Association of Canada, Myths and Truths , 2005
  • 85. An Angus Reid poll of Canadian CEOs indicated that 61% found it difficult to find workers with the necessary skills. They said attracting and retaining employees is the top priority for business today. Bill Wilkerson, Business Case for Accessibility , November 2001
  • 86. One 2000 survey of 1,600 employees by Watson Wyatt Canadian Research and Information Centre found that commitment of Canadian employees to their employers has dropped to the lowest level in a decade. Bill Wilkerson, Business Case for Accessibility , November 2001
  • 87. Another survey by the same firm found that because of this lack of commitment, absenteeism and employee disability management costs have risen from 5.6% of payroll costs in 1997 to 7.1% in 2000. Bill Wilkerson, Business Case for Accessibility , November 2001
  • 88. Most persons with disabilities don’t consider themselves permanently unemployable. They perceive themselves as independent and want to make the reality of their lives consistent with that vision and sense of identity. Bill Wilkerson, Business Case for Accessibility , November 2001
  • 89. DuPont’s 1990 survey confirmed that workers with disabilities rated average or above… In safety: 97% In attendance: 86% In performance of job duties: 90% Bill Wilkerson, Business Case for Accessibility , November 2001
  • 90. Pizza Hut found that employees with disabilities had a retention rate 22% higher than their able bodied counterparts. Bill Wilkerson, Business Case for Accessibility , November 2001
  • 91. dizABLED by John & Claire Lytle
  • 92. One in six Canadians has a disability. Bill Wilkerson, Business Case for Accessibility , November 2001
  • 93. An April 2000 analysis by the Royal Bank of Canada notes that corporations risk tarnishing their reputations if they’re known to have underestimated the needs and interests of people with mental or physical disabilities. Bill Wilkerson, Business Case for Accessibility , November 2001
  • 94. Both the typewriter and the telephone were based on efforts to overcome limitations for people with disabilities. Bill Wilkerson, Business Case for Accessibility , November 2001
  • 95. Pizza Hut found that because one in 10 of its customers had a family member with a disability, the act of employing more disabled workers improved sales and customer loyalty. Bill Wilkerson, Business Case for Accessibility , November 2001
  • 96. At 1.1 billion potential consumers, disability represents the world’s largest emerging market. It is a market that cuts across any boundary one can dream up, and how your firm addresses this opportunity marks the difference between exceptional growth and business as usual. Integrated Process Solutions LLC, http://www.returnondisability.com
  • 97. The American National Captioning Institute research indicated that 57% of people with a hearing-impairment said they were more likely to buy a product advertised in a captioned commercial. Bill Wilkerson, Business Case for Accessibility , November 2001
  • 98. In a July 2001 article, architect Pamela Cluff observed that seniors and people with disabilities — two increasingly overlapping groups — taken together, “will represent between 20 to 25% of the recreation, retail, entertainment, workplace and housing marketplaces in the next 10 years and beyond.” Bill Wilkerson, Business Case for Accessibility , November 2001
  • 99. There are over 50 million North Americans with classifiable disabilities and about 12 million of them travel. Bill Wilkerson, Business Case for Accessibility , November 2001
  • 100. Right now, the CSA is in the midst of developing new standards for services with respect to people with disabilities. Bill Wilkerson, Business Case for Accessibility , November 2001
  • 101. Crippen by Dave Lupton
  • 102. Architect Pamela Cluff notes that universal design will only add about 5% to the construction budget and much, much less if accessible design is included as part of the plans and overall design of any new construction project. Bill Wilkerson, Business Case for Accessibility , November 2001
  • 103. Price of retrofitting a commercial or retail space will be only about: <ul><li>$800 - $1,000 per linear foot to construct ramps </li></ul><ul><li>$3,500 - $4,000 each for automatic door openers </li></ul><ul><li>$7,000 - $8,000 for an accessible unisex public washroom </li></ul><ul><li>$6,000 - $7,000 to provide wiring and hearing-assisted devices for the average conference room </li></ul>Bill Wilkerson, Business Case for Accessibility , November 2001
  • 104. A common example of an accommodation that demonstrates little respect for the dignity of a person is a wheelchair entrance over a loading dock or through a service area or garbage room. Alison M. Konrad, Kaye Leslie & Don Peuramaki , Full Accessibility by 2025, Ivey Business Journal, September/October 2007
  • 105. Businesses that place a priority on inclusion and accessibility within their workplaces, public relations initiatives and overall corporate culture will have a distinct advantage and competitive edge over businesses which lag behind. Alison M. Konrad, Kaye Leslie & Don Peuramaki , Full Accessibility by 2025, Ivey Business Journal, September/October 2007
  • 106. Mobil Corporation’s equation: &quot;diverse workforce = good reputation = shareholder returns&quot; Dr. Jeffrey Gandz , A Business Case for Diversity, HRDC Canada, 2001
  • 107. Job candidates and employees are not required to disclose disability status to employers or prospective employers . Alison M. Konrad, Kaye Leslie & Don Peuramaki , Full Accessibility by 2025, Ivey Business Journal, September/October 2007
  • 108. Minnesota Diversified Industries, a $6.3 million enterprise in St. Paul, employs over 500 people, more than half of whom have &quot;developmental&quot; disabilities, for duties considered to be detail-oriented, repetitive work. Dr. Jeffrey Gandz , A Business Case for Diversity, HRDC Canada, 2001
  • 109. To encourage employees to disclose their disabilities, employers can express their willingness to provide reasonable accommodation for workers with disabilities and create a history of treating workers with disabilities in a respectful and confidential manner. Alison M. Konrad, Kaye Leslie & Don Peuramaki , Full Accessibility by 2025, Ivey Business Journal, September/October 2007
  • 110. A commonly told story in seminars about accommodating disabilities describes the experience of a disability activist, who is a lawyer and blind. One day in court in the middle of a case, chaos broke out. When the lawyer asked his assistant what had happened, he was informed that the power had gone out and there were no lights. Court was adjourned until the following day. As he remarked to a colleague “You sighted people ask for so much! You want every room in every building wired for lighting and you just can’t function without it. Do you know how much that costs?” Alison M. Konrad, Kaye Leslie & Don Peuramaki , Full Accessibility by 2025, Ivey Business Journal, September/October 2007
  • 111. dizABLED by John & Claire Lytle
  • 112. Frito-Lay Inc.’s Dennis Zeleny says a diversity of backgrounds yields a diversity of ideas, which is key to creating the best marketing strategies. &quot;Smart, good consumer-packaged goods companies in particular, if they're going to continue to be successful, are involved and supportive (of diversity) because its the right business thing to do.&quot; Dr. Jeffrey Gandz , A Business Case for Diversity, HRDC Canada, 2001
  • 113. Data from Simmons Market Research Bureau indicates, of people with disabilities… <ul><li>48% are principal shoppers for their household </li></ul><ul><li>46% are married </li></ul><ul><li>77% have no children – increasing their disposable income </li></ul><ul><li>58% own their own homes </li></ul>Bill Wilkerson, Business Case for Accessibility , November 2001
  • 114. “ You learn to talk by talking. You learn to read by reading. You learn to write by writing. You learn to include by including.” Gary Bunch Strategies for Educators to Create Inclusive and Accessible Community Schools, Together We Rock
  • 115. For decades, persons with disabilities have been identified by their disability first, and as persons, second. Often, persons with disabilities are viewed as being afflicted with, or being victims of, a disability. Removing Bias in Language: American Press Association Style, quoted in Suggested Guidelines for Language to Promote Positive Images of People with Disabilities, Together We Rock
  • 116. People with disabilities are often viewed as tragic figures whom society should pity. Disability does not mean a poor quality of life. It is often the negative attitudes of society and the lack of accessibility within the community that are the real tragedy. Common Myths and Misconceptions about People with Disabilities, Together We Rock
  • 117. George Covington, a writer who is blind, has said, “We’re seen as inspirational, and inspiration sells like hotcakes. My disability isn’t a burden: having to be so damned inspirational is.” Common Myths and Misconceptions about People with Disabilities, Together We Rock
  • 118. Companies that had hired more people with disabilities during the preceding five years told the CCDS, they had: <ul><li>Overcome negative stereotypes about people with disabilities </li></ul><ul><li>Understood the idea of a diverse workplace </li></ul><ul><li>Partnered with associations supporting people with disabilities and used them as a source of recruitment </li></ul><ul><li>Advertised on specific web sites targeted to people with disabilities </li></ul><ul><li>Worked with Workers’ Compensation Boards through vocational rehabilitation programs </li></ul><ul><li>Made their entryways more accessible </li></ul>Bill Wilkerson, Business Case for Accessibility , November 2001
  • 119. Researchers at Dawson College and MacKay Centre in Montreal remind us: “Mechanics who are blind, nurses who are wheelchair users, teachers who are hard of hearing, painters without arms, and chemists with shaky limbs- it’s all been done!” Common Myths and Misconceptions about People with Disabilities, Together We Rock
  • 120. <ul><li>For more information </li></ul><ul><li>on Workforce Diversity Edmonton, </li></ul><ul><li>contact Dennis Gane, </li></ul><ul><li>Diversity Business Development Specialist </li></ul><ul><li>at (780) 409-2628 or via email </li></ul><ul><li>at dgane@edmontonchamber.com </li></ul>

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