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Institute of Design: Teaming Workshop By Chris Bernard

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This are slides for a Teaming Presentation and One Day workshop that I've taught at the Institute of Design on three occasions. I've included the slides in .PPT format which you may reference with …

This are slides for a Teaming Presentation and One Day workshop that I've taught at the Institute of Design on three occasions. I've included the slides in .PPT format which you may reference with proper accreditation. Note I've pulled some content and provided links to it to respect copyrights. Want me to conduct this workshop for you? Hire me! Email bernard@id.iit.edu for more information.

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  • The goal of this workshop is teach all ID students, faculty, staff and adjuncts how to team and collaborate more effectively. This is the third time we’ve taught this workshop and after we are done a little under a half of our community will have been exposed to it. Your job is to be evangelists for what we collectively learn in this workshop so that your other ID peers can be effective collaborators and synthesizers too.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Chris Bernard ID teaming workshop Look for me on Twitter, FaceBook and LinkedIn This presentation is for educations purposes only. Photos from istockphoto.com unless otherwise noted.
    • 2. What’s going to happen today?
    • 3. We’ll learn about collaborating effectively
    • 4. Making hard things easier
    • 5. Picking the right approaches
    • 6. Understanding how we’re different
    • 7. Learn how to not ignore dysfunction
    • 8. Push our teams in the right direction
    • 9. What to do when we get stuck
    • 10. Details
      • Introductions (Discussion) 60 minutes 08:30am to 09:30am
      • Teaming Frameworks (Lecture) 30 minutes 09:30am to 10:00am Break 15 minutes 10:00am to 10:15am Understanding each other (Lecture) 30 minutes 10:15am to 10:45am
      • Feedback (Lecture) 15 minutes 10:45am to 11:00am
      • Exercises (Team-based) 60 minutes 11:00am to 12:00pm Lunch 60 minutes 12:00am to 01:00pm Understanding our team (Lecture) 15 minutes 01:00pm to 01:15pm Exercises (Team-based) 90 minutes 01:15pm to 02:45pm Break 15 minutes 02:45pm to 03:00pm Exercise summary (Discussion) 60 minutes 03:00pm to 04:00pm Getting unstuck (Lecture) 45 minutes 04:00pm to 04:45pm Break 15 minutes 04:45pm to 05:00pm Wrap up (Discussion) 30 minutes 05:00pm to 05:30pm Offsite (Optional) 05:30pm to…
    • 11. Who am I?
      • An ID alumni, MDM 2006
      • Designer
      • Consultant
      • Equal mix of work at small companies and the enterprise
    • 12. What do people think of designers?
    • 13. Designer Tracker Project
      • Methodology: 10k designers, 15 countries
      • Goal: surface key “essence” of the designer audience
      • Results have guided v1 of product offerings
      95% black is favorite color (except Japan, where charcoal black is top) 55% wear turtlenecks 5+ days a month (81% of those are black) Ponytails are disproportionately common (32% of men 86% of women)
    • 14. Leadership Stewardship Resource Management Marketing Technology Design = = = = = = CEO COO CFO CMO CTO ?
    • 15. Identifying Opportunities GOOD BAD GOOD Vision + Invention =
    • 16. Design icons are different for all of us Source: Microsoft
    • 17. Meet the designer Source: Microsoft
    • 18. What do our peers think ? Clement Mok “ There has clearly been a steady decline in the design profession for over 30 years, and the source of that decline is the profession’s intractable stasis . We are unchanged professionals in a changing professional climate, clutching at old idols, while failing to create new offerings, failing to reinvent and reinvigorate the practice when needed, failing to inculcate a professional culture that is accessible and fair.” Source: Communication Arts
    • 19.
      • Nobody knows how much to spend
      • It’s the process and not the pocketbook
      • Collaboration is the key
      What does business think ? Source: Strategy+Business
    • 20. What do we think?
      • Which of the following have been characteristics of good team experiences at ID?
      Source: Dave McGaw, ID
    • 21.
      • Team members have a mix of levels of experience
      • Team members have a mix of skills
      • At least one person has project management skills
      • People take turns leading the project
      • Team makes clear assignments at each meeting for who does the work
      • Team has regular weekly meetings scheduled
      • Teams use tools like blogs…etc., to collaborate and share files remotely
      • Teams meet socially at least once during the project
      • Teams members evaluate each other periodically during the project
      What do we think? Source: Dave McGaw, ID
    • 22. What do we think?
      • Which of the following have been characteristics of bad team experiences at ID?
      Source: Dave McGaw, ID
    • 23. What do we think?
      • Team members have the same skills
      • The same person is the leader for most of the project
      • The project operates by consensus —no single leader at any time
      • Teams improvising solutions just before presenting
      Source: Dave McGaw, ID
    • 24. What do we want?
      • I expect good teamwork skills to be an important part of my design career
      • I have good teamwork skills right now
      • I would benefit from improving my teamwork skills
      Source: Dave McGaw, ID
    • 25. Agenda
      • We have a full day
      • We have three 15 minute breaks
      • We have 60 minutes for lunch
    • 26. Code of conduct
      • Engage , turn off the cell-phone, use the laptop for notes only
      • One voice at a time
      • Respect your fellow participants
      • Meet your fellow participants
    • 27. Things I’ve learned
      • The best insights in this class come at the seams
        • During team exercises
        • During team feedback
        • During the breaks and ad hoc conversations over lunch, after class and online
    • 28. Details
      • Introductions (Discussion) 60 minutes 08:30am to 09:30am
      • Teaming Frameworks (Lecture) 30 minutes 09:30am to 10:00am Break 15 minutes 10:00am to 10:15am Understanding each other (Lecture) 30 minutes 10:15am to 10:45am
      • Feedback (Lecture) 15 minutes 10:45am to 11:00am
      • Exercises (Team-based) 60 minutes 11:00am to 12:00pm Lunch 60 minutes 12:00am to 01:00pm Understanding our team (Lecture) 15 minutes 01:00pm to 01:15pm Exercises (Team-based) 90 minutes 01:15pm to 02:45pm Break 15 minutes 02:45pm to 03:00pm Exercise summary (Discussion) 60 minutes 03:00pm to 04:00pm Getting unstuck (Lecture) 45 minutes 04:00pm to 04:45pm Break 15 minutes 04:45pm to 05:00pm Wrap up (Discussion) 30 minutes 05:00pm to 05:30pm Offsite (Optional) 05:30pm to…
    • 29. A framework for teams 30 Minutes
    • 30.  
    • 31.
      • Are you really a team?
      • Are you ready for heavy lifting?
      Two things to ask yourself when thinking about teaming… Source: Wisdom of Teams
    • 32. What we want to learn
      • How to determine if a team is the right choice
      • How to chose the right kind of team
      • Understanding what is required to enable the success of the team
      Source: Wisdom of Teams
    • 33. At the Institute of Design we care about…
    • 34. High Performance Teams
    • 35. But, be careful
    • 36.  
    • 37. Sometimes you don’t need a high performance team to get the job done
    • 38. Effective Groups
    • 39.
      • An effective group doesn’t require the discipline and rigor of a performance unit.
      • When the characteristics of a performance unit are applied to a group it can frustrate and overburden users.
      • Typical effective groups merely requires an…
      • understandable charter
      • good communication
      • defined member roles
      • time-efficient processes
      • reasonable accountability
      Effective groups versus high performance teams Source: Wisdom of Teams
    • 40. Single-leader Units
    • 41. Single-leader units versus high performance teams
      • Single-leader units function differently than a performing team in that the traditional management style of leadership is imposed with a designate that…
      • makes the key decisions
      • delegates and monitors individual assignments and accountability
      • chooses how and when to modify specific approaches.
      • The benefit of this approach is that it is more agile and familiar to most individuals than the techniques required to be a performing team.
      Source: Wisdom of Teams
    • 42. High Performance Teams
    • 43. Six things to know about teams
    • 44.
      • In The Wisdom of Teams Katzenbach and Smith identified six basics criteria that were required for effective performing teams.
      Characteristics of high performance teams Source: Wisdom of Teams
    • 45. Small numbers
    • 46. Small numbers
      • Large numbers of people have trouble interacting constructively as a group.
      • Performing teams typically function best when there are a small number of people working together with four to six people often being a good target.
      • Single leader and effective groups also benefit from smallness but the less resource intensive nature of process required for this types of teams typically means they can be a little larger, in the range of twelve to twenty-five people.
      Source: Wisdom of Teams
    • 47. Complementary skills
    • 48. Complementary skills
      • In the enterprise high performance companies build teams based on complementary skills—this of course requires an understanding of what skills people have.
      • It’s further complicated in a learning institution around not only understanding what skills people have but also what skills they would like to develop.
      • Insights into technical and functional expertise, problem solving and decision making skills and interpersonal skills are all factors that go into the creation of effective teams.
      Source: Wisdom of Teams
    • 49. Common purpose
    • 50. Common purpose
      • A team’s eventual performance is directly correlated to its purpose . If team members have a different purpose or that the purpose of the team is unknown, it’s difficult for teams to perform effectively.
      Source: Wisdom of Teams
    • 51. Common goals Common goals
    • 52. Common set of specific performance goals
      • Specific performance goals are also essential for most teams to function effectively and they need to be defined for or developed by the team.
      Source: Wisdom of Teams
    • 53. Common working approach
    • 54. Commonly agreed upon working approach
      • Teams that can’t standardize on the same working environments and tools often do not function well. Incompatible software and collaboration tools can cripple teams and cause massive hits to productivity and effectiveness.
      Source: Wisdom of Teams
    • 55. Mutual accountability
    • 56. Mutual accountability
      • Teams need to hold themselves accountable and be evaluated as a team .
      • Organizations that expect team performance but only reward individual contribution in absence of accountability to a team are often ineffective. If we don’t incent the performance we want, we wont get the performance we want.
      Source: Wisdom of Teams
    • 57. ID Teaming Workshop Source: Wisdom of Teams
    • 58. Take a Break 15 minutes
    • 59. Details
      • Introductions (Discussion) 60 minutes 08:30am to 09:30am
      • Teaming Frameworks (Lecture) 30 minutes 09:30am to 10:00am Break 15 minutes 10:00am to 10:15am Understanding each other (Lecture) 30 minutes 10:15am to 10:45am
      • Feedback (Lecture) 15 minutes 10:45am to 11:00am
      • Exercises (Team-based) 60 minutes 11:00am to 12:00pm Lunch 60 minutes 12:00am to 01:00pm Understanding our team (Lecture) 15 minutes 01:00pm to 01:15pm Exercises (Team-based) 90 minutes 01:15pm to 02:45pm Break 15 minutes 02:45pm to 03:00pm Exercise summary (Discussion) 60 minutes 03:00pm to 04:00pm Getting unstuck (Lecture) 45 minutes 04:00pm to 04:45pm Break 15 minutes 04:45pm to 05:00pm Wrap up (Discussion) 30 minutes 05:00pm to 05:30pm Offsite (Optional) 05:30pm to…
    • 60. Understanding each other 30 Minutes
    • 61. We’re different
    • 62. Individual differences
      • What makes it hard to work with other folks?
      • How does this manifest itself at ID?
      • Do we have similarities, what are they?
      • How can we learn more about similarities and differences before we start teaming?
    • 63. What is a Meyers Briggs Type Indicator?
      • The Meyers Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) is a personality profiling tool that has over 50 years of data behind it.
      • There are no right or wrong answers and the findings are not absolute, it’s not fate and it’s not destiny.
      • It’s simply a tool to help facilitate your understanding of your own patterns of behavior and have a common language and set of tools to understand others.
      Source: Description for Self-Discovery
    • 64. Personality has several aspects
      • The contextual self
      • The developed self
      • The true self
      • Understanding personality… …patterns, processes, structure, purpose
      Source: Description for Self-Discovery
    • 65.
      • If you prefer to direct your energy to deal with people, things, situations, or "the outer world", then your preference is for Extraversion . This is denoted by the letter "E".
      • If you prefer to direct your energy to deal with ideas, information, explanations or beliefs, or "the inner world", then your preference is for Introversion . This is denoted by the letter "I".
      Where, primarily, do you prefer to direct your energy? Source: Team Technology
    • 66. Where, primarily, do you prefer to direct your energy?
      • Extraversion (E)
      • Sociability
      • Interaction
      • External
      • Breadth
      • Outside thrust
      • Relationships
      • Action
      • External events
      • Do-think-do
      • 75%
      • Introversion (I)
      • Solitary
      • Concentration
      • Internal
      • Depth
      • Inside pull
      • Deep friendship
      • Reflection
      • Internal reations
      • Think-do-think
      • 25%
      Source: IBM
    • 67.
      • If you prefer to deal with facts, what you know, to have clarity, or to describe what you see, then your preference is for Sensing . This is denoted by the letter "S".
      • If you prefer to deal with ideas, look into the unknown, to generate new possibilities or to anticipate what isn't obvious, then your preference is for Intuition . This is denoted by the letter "N" (the letter I has already been used for Introversion).
      How do you prefer to process information? Source: Team Technology
    • 68.
      • Sensing (S)
      • The five senses
      • What is real
      • Practical
      • Facts
      • Present orientation
      • Sensible
      • Perspiration
      • Down-to-earth
      • 75%
      • Intuition (N)
      • Hunches
      • What could be
      • Theoretical
      • Insights
      • Possibilities
      • Imaginative
      • Inspiration
      • Head-in-clouds
      • 25%
      How do you prefer to process information? Source: IBM
    • 69. How do you prefer to make decisions?
      • If you prefer to decide on the basis of objective logic, using an analytic and detached approach, then your preference is for Thinking . This is denoted by the letter "T".
      • If you prefer to decide using values and/or personal beliefs, on the basis of what you believe is important or what you or others care about, then your preference is for Feeling . This is denoted by the letter "F".
      Source: Team Technology
    • 70.
      • Thinking (T)
      • Head
      • Logical system
      • Objective
      • Critique
      • Reason
      • Firm but fair
      • Impersonal
      • Firmness
      • 50%
      • Feeling (F)
      • Heart
      • Value system
      • Subjective
      • Compliment
      • Empathy
      • Compassionate
      • Personal
      • Persuasion
      • 50%
      How do you prefer to make decisions? Source: IBM
    • 71. How do you prefer to organize your life?
      • If you prefer your life to be planned, stable and organized then your preference is for Judging (not to be confused with 'Judgmental', which is quite different). This is denoted by the letter "J".
      • If you prefer to go with the flow, to maintain flexibility and respond to things as they arise, then your preference is for Perception . This is denoted by the letter "P".
      Source: Team Technology
    • 72.
      • Judging (J)
      • Planning
      • Control
      • Settled
      • Run one’s life
      • Set goals
      • Decisive
      • Organized
      • Structured
      • 50%
      • Perceiving (P)
      • Spontaneous
      • Adapt
      • Tentative
      • Let life happen
      • Get information
      • Open
      • Flexible
      • Unstructured
      • 50%
      How do you prefer to organize your life? Source: IBM
    • 73. Things to keep in mind
      • The MBTI doesn’t measure ability, skills, or potential.
      • The MBTI merely gives you (and others) insights into dominant preferences that you may exhibit in different environments.
      Source: Description for Self-Discovery
    • 74. Teams don’t function well without feedback
    • 75. Giving feedback 15 Minutes
    • 76. Three concepts around feedback
      • How to listen
      • How to give
      • How to receive
    • 77. How can we listen more effectively?
      • We can…
      • Establish rapport
      • Suspend judgment
      • Demonstrate interest
      • Encourage the person to talk
      • Maintain appropriate silence
      • Clarify understanding
      • Respond to the message
      Source: IBM
    • 78. How should we give feedback?
      • Use a positive approach
      • Be specific
      • Give feedback on things that a person can change
      • Check for understanding
      • Discuss what you way or heard
      Source: IBM
    • 79. How should we receive feedback?
      • Relax
      • Listen carefully, avoid interrupting
      • Ask questions for clarity
      • Acknowledge valid points
      • Take time to sort out what you heard
      Source: IBM
    • 80. A word about coaching
      • Sharing experience, giving feedback, and enabling people can be augmented with coaching.
      • Coaching is like fishing and therapy all wrapped up into one
      • Good coaches help people understand how to solve their own problems
      Source: IBM
    • 81. A coaching model
    • 82. Let’s try it
    • 83. Team Exercises 60 Minutes
    • 84. Conclusions
      • What have we learned so far?
    • 85. Details
      • Introductions (Discussion) 60 minutes 08:30am to 09:30am
      • Teaming Frameworks (Lecture) 30 minutes 09:30am to 10:00am Break 15 minutes 10:00am to 10:15am Understanding each other (Lecture) 30 minutes 10:15am to 10:45am
      • Feedback (Lecture) 15 minutes 10:45am to 11:00am
      • Exercises (Team-based) 60 minutes 11:00am to 12:00pm Lunch 60 minutes 12:00am to 01:00pm Understanding our team (Lecture) 15 minutes 01:00pm to 01:15pm Exercises (Team-based) 90 minutes 01:15pm to 02:45pm Break 15 minutes 02:45pm to 03:00pm Exercise summary (Discussion) 60 minutes 03:00pm to 04:00pm Getting unstuck (Lecture) 45 minutes 04:00pm to 04:45pm Break 15 minutes 04:45pm to 05:00pm Wrap up (Discussion) 30 minutes 05:00pm to 05:30pm Offsite (Optional) 05:30pm to…
    • 86. Eat Lunch
      • 45 minutes
    • 87. Details
      • Introductions (Discussion) 60 minutes 08:30am to 09:30am
      • Teaming Frameworks (Lecture) 30 minutes 09:30am to 10:00am Break 15 minutes 10:00am to 10:15am Understanding each other (Lecture) 30 minutes 10:15am to 10:45am
      • Feedback (Lecture) 15 minutes 10:45am to 11:00am
      • Exercises (Team-based) 60 minutes 11:00am to 12:00pm Lunch 60 minutes 12:00am to 01:00pm Understanding our team (Lecture) 15 minutes 01:00pm to 01:15pm Exercises (Team-based) 90 minutes 01:15pm to 02:45pm Break 15 minutes 02:45pm to 03:00pm Exercise summary (Discussion) 60 minutes 03:00pm to 04:00pm Getting unstuck (Lecture) 45 minutes 04:00pm to 04:45pm Break 15 minutes 04:45pm to 05:00pm Wrap up (Discussion) 30 minutes 05:00pm to 05:30pm Offsite (Optional) 05:30pm to…
    • 88. Understanding our teams
    • 89. Introduction 15 minutes
    • 90.
      • The Basadur Creative Problem Solving Profile (CPSP) Inventory measures an individual's unique blend of preferences for four stages of what is defined as the creative process. One's largest quadrant on the graph represents one's preferred or dominant style, while the sizes of the other quadrants represent supporting orientations in turn. The resulting unique blend of styles is one's profile.
      What is the Creative Problem Solving Profile (CPSP)? Source: Min Basadur and GK Van Patter (www.nextd.org)
    • 91. What is the Creative Problem Solving Profile (CPSP)? Source: Min Basadur and GK Van Patter (www.nextd.org)
    • 92.
      • Each unique style reflects individual preferences for ways of gaining and using knowledge. Some people prefer to understand things more by experiencing while others prefer to use abstract thinking and analysis to understand. Also, some prefer to use understanding for generating options while others prefer to use understanding to evaluate options.
      • The Basadur CPS Profile is not a personality test.
      • It measures states , not traits .
      What is the Creative Problem Solving Profile (CPSP)? Source: Min Basadur and GK Van Patter (www.nextd.org)
    • 93.
      • The creative problem solving profile is constructed on two of these dimensions.
      • First, by two opposite ways of gaining knowledge:
      • (1) By direct experience and
      • (2) By abstract, analytical, logical thinking.
      • Second, by two opposite ways of using knowledge:
      • (1) By ideation (making new possibilities, breaking connections, diverging)
      • (2) By evaluation (testing and verifying new possibilities, making connections, converging).
      The CPSP looks at how people get knowledge and how they use it Source: Min Basadur and GK Van Patter (www.nextd.org)
    • 94.
      • The CPSP is a way of diagnosing and explaining the different creative
      • problem solving inclinations and skills one person has relative to another so
      • that the two can understand how to team together for synergy and increased
      • creativity, combining their strengths.
      The CPSP looks at how people get knowledge and how they use it Source: Min Basadur and GK Van Patter (www.nextd.org)
    • 95. Let’s try it 90 minutes
    • 96. Details
      • Introductions (Discussion) 60 minutes 08:30am to 09:30am
      • Teaming Frameworks (Lecture) 30 minutes 09:30am to 10:00am Break 15 minutes 10:00am to 10:15am Understanding each other (Lecture) 30 minutes 10:15am to 10:45am
      • Feedback (Lecture) 15 minutes 10:45am to 11:00am
      • Exercises (Team-based) 60 minutes 11:00am to 12:00pm Lunch 60 minutes 12:00am to 01:00pm Understanding our team (Lecture) 15 minutes 01:00pm to 01:15pm Exercises (Team-based) 90 minutes 01:15pm to 02:45pm Break 15 minutes 02:45pm to 03:00pm Exercise summary (Discussion) 60 minutes 03:00pm to 04:00pm Getting unstuck (Lecture) 45 minutes 04:00pm to 04:45pm Break 15 minutes 04:45pm to 05:00pm Wrap up (Discussion) 30 minutes 05:00pm to 05:30pm Offsite (Optional) 05:30pm to…
    • 97. Take a Break 15 minutes
    • 98. Details
      • Introductions (Discussion) 60 minutes 08:30am to 09:30am
      • Teaming Frameworks (Lecture) 30 minutes 09:30am to 10:00am Break 15 minutes 10:00am to 10:15am Understanding each other (Lecture) 30 minutes 10:15am to 10:45am
      • Feedback (Lecture) 15 minutes 10:45am to 11:00am
      • Exercises (Team-based) 60 minutes 11:00am to 12:00pm Lunch 60 minutes 12:00am to 01:00pm Understanding our team (Lecture) 15 minutes 01:00pm to 01:15pm Exercises (Team-based) 90 minutes 01:15pm to 02:45pm Break 15 minutes 02:45pm to 03:00pm Exercise summary (Discussion) 60 minutes 03:00pm to 04:00pm Getting unstuck (Lecture) 45 minutes 04:00pm to 04:45pm Break 15 minutes 04:45pm to 05:00pm Wrap up (Discussion) 30 minutes 05:00pm to 05:30pm Offsite (Optional) 05:30pm to…
    • 99. Summary on the CPSP 45 minutes
    • 100. Some stuff is missing…
      • This next section contains copyrighted content that I’ve pulled from this presentation because I’m not permitted to show it out of a classroom setting.
      • However you can get the gist of everything I’m saying by going to NextD.org where they’ve thoughtfully posted all this content. Check it out for yourselves and make the investment of profiling yourself and your teams. It’s the best tool I’ve found for creative teams.
    • 101. Generator Description
      • The Generator’s two dominant creative problem solving inclinations are (1) learning by
      • direct experience, that is, sensing the world around by touch, smell, taste, hearing and
      • seeing; absorbing knowledge by getting involved personally and experiencing and
      • gathering information, and (2) ideation, that is, imagining possibilities, seeing relevance
      • in everything, seeing different points of view; dreaming about what might be; wondering
      • why things seem to be what they are; speculating about the future. The combination of
      • these two inclinations indicate a preference for problem sensing and fact finding kinds of
      • activities in the creative process. The Generator is an initiator, a proliferator of
      • opportunities, problems, facts and feelings - very sensitive to the world around, absorbing
      • diverse information and possibilities that might have relevance to the organization or to
      • oneself. The Generator is very comfortable with high ambiguity and proliferation of
      • much information and potential opportunity. He loves to get things started and is likely
      • strong in Steps 1 and 2 of the creative process. Generators are idea starters.
      Source: Min Basadur
    • 102. Conceptualizer Description
      • The Conceptualizer’s creative problem solving inclinations are (1) using knowledge for
      • ideation (as above) and (2) learning by abstract analysis, logic and conceptualization
      • (trying to develop an understanding or explanation or theory which offers an explanation
      • of a situation; being detached and objective; doing rational, logical thinking; having
      • things make sense in the abstract). The Conceptualizer’s combination of these two
      • inclinations indicate a preference for problem definition and idea generation (Steps 3 and 4 of the Basadur creative process) via a propensity to patiently take a wide range of
      • seemingly disparate facts or idea fragments and possibilities and combine or assimilate
      • them into integrated explanations, theories, problem definitions and ideas to be tested.
      • Conceptualizers are good at extracting and defining the opportunity or problem posing it
      • and developing a list of ideas which may solve it. They are idea developers.
      Source: Min Basadur
    • 103. Optimizer Description
      • The Optimizer’s creative problem solving inclinations are (1) learning by abstract
      • analysis, logic and conceptualizing and (2) using the knowledge for evaluation by testing
      • possibilities, that is, experimentation (trying to verify theories; confirming ideas and
      • notions; learnings and pinning down practical knowledge gained during testing).
      • These two inclinations indicate the optimizer to be involved in the practical application of
      • ideas, planning how to make ideas work in the real world and optimizing solutions.
      • In the creative process, this involves testing and rational, logical evaluation of ideas, selection of the best ones and planning concrete steps for making them practical and
      • implementable (Step 5 and 6 of the process). Optimizers are solution developers.
      Source: Min Basadur
    • 104. Implementer Description
      • The Implementer’s combination of inclinations toward (1) using knowledge for
      • evaluation and (2) learning by direct experience indicate a great deal of implementation
      • activity - gaining acceptance from others for changes and making those changes work
      • and stick. (Steps 7 and 8 of the creative process) The Implementer does not worry a great
      • deal about understanding the theory behind the new idea, plan or product. He wants to
      • take it and “run with it”, work with it, show others how to use it, fit it to others’ needs,
      • adapt it to various circumstances, try it one way and if it doesn’t work, try it another way.
      • The Implementer’s combination of inclinations toward (1) using knowledge for
      • evaluation and (2) learning by direct experience indicate a great deal of implementation
      • activity - gaining acceptance from others for changes and making those changes work
      • and stick. (Steps 7 and 8 of the creative process) The Implementer does not worry a great
      • deal about understanding the theory behind the new idea, plan or product. He wants to
      • take it and “run with it”, work with it, show others how to use it, fit it to others’ needs,
      • adapt it to various circumstances, try it one way and if it doesn’t work, try it another way.
      Source: Min Basadur
    • 105. Conclusions about how to use the CPSP
      • For any organizational team to be an effective creative problem solver, strengths in all four quadrants is important. This is achieved through the blend of people on the team. It is also important that the individuals in that organization or team use their strengths in a complementary way and not get frustrated by others who may have opposite inclinations (e.g., optimizers and generators, implementers and conceptualizers).
      • To achieve the best outcomes, projects in organizations need to move through the “generation conceptualization- optimization-implementation” cycle. Ideas for new projects must start somewhere - that is, the generator function, to be sensitive to the world around picking up data and cues and suggesting possible opportunities. Thus, the generator function raises a wealth of ideas and facts - usually not fully thought through, but simply in the form of starting points for new projects.
      • Next the conceptualizer function is needed to pull together the facts and idea fragments from the generator phase into well thought out and developed ideas and defined problems and concepts worthy of further development. The conceptualizers give sound structure to fledgling ideas and problems. The optimizer function is to take the selected structured project, problem or idea and find a practical solution or action plan that is well detailed, efficient and optimum.
      • Finally, it is up to the implementation function to carry the practical solutions and plans for the project forward and get them implemented - convincing management or customers or other employees as necessary and adapting the solutions and plans as necessary to make them fit into the real world.
      Source: Min Basadur
    • 106. When you get stuck
    • 107. Getting unstuck 45 minutes
    • 108. Some stuff is missing…
      • This next section contains some content that is copyrighted that I can’t display out of an academic setting.
      • The good news is that you can get the gist of this presentation by going to www.unstuck.com , explore the site, buy the book!
      • But first, look at www.unstuck.com/pdf/UNSTUCK_excerpt.pdf to get an idea of what this section is about.
    • 109. So, how stuck are you?
      • Do you have a clear, inspiring purpose?
      • Do you have the right people, in the right roles to make a difference?
      • Do you work effectively as a team? Can you always get the right stuff done?
      • Does the team truly get the most from diversity—in skills, geography, gender, age, ethnicity—to broaden it’s thinking?
      Source: Unstuck
    • 110. So, how stuck are you?
      • Do you know how to make decisions?
      • Do those decisions stick?
      • Is your team capable of radical ideas?
      • If your team leader quit today, could your team carry on?
      Source: Unstuck
    • 111. Figuring out why we’re stuck
    • 112. Diagnosing why you’re stuck
      • The serious seven
      Source: Unstuck
    • 113. Diagnosing why you’re stuck
      • Overwhelmed
      • Exhausted
      • Directionless
      • Hopeless
      • Battle-torn
      • Worthless
      • Alone
      Source: Unstuck
    • 114. Details
      • Introductions (Discussion) 60 minutes 08:30am to 09:30am
      • Teaming Frameworks (Lecture) 30 minutes 09:30am to 10:00am Break 15 minutes 10:00am to 10:15am Understanding each other (Lecture) 30 minutes 10:15am to 10:45am
      • Feedback (Lecture) 15 minutes 10:45am to 11:00am
      • Exercises (Team-based) 60 minutes 11:00am to 12:00pm Lunch 60 minutes 12:00am to 01:00pm Understanding our team (Lecture) 15 minutes 01:00pm to 01:15pm Exercises (Team-based) 90 minutes 01:15pm to 02:45pm Break 15 minutes 02:45pm to 03:00pm Exercise summary (Discussion) 60 minutes 03:00pm to 04:00pm Getting unstuck (Lecture) 45 minutes 04:00pm to 04:45pm Break 15 minutes 04:45pm to 05:00pm Wrap up (Discussion) 30 minutes 05:00pm to 05:30pm Offsite (Optional) 05:30pm to…
    • 115. Take a Break 15 minutes, but be on time, we’re almost there!
    • 116. Connecting the dots 15 minutes
    • 117. Resources & what’s next
      • So, we’re doomed , what do we do now?
        • We take the learnings from this workshop and apply them to our design methods toolkit.
        • We already know how to solve hard business problems and the serious seven are simply a more contained version of the problems we address every day.
      Source: Unstuck
    • 118. If you buy two books buy these
    • 119. Other reading
      • Getting Things Done, David Allen Time Management Info: http://www.davidco.com/what_is_gtd.php
      • The Art of Project Management, Scott Berkun Project Management Get a free chapter of this book here: http://www.scottberkun.com/books/artofpm/artofpmch03.pdf Learn more here: http://www.scottberkun.com
      • Unstuck, Keith Yamashita & Sandra Spataro Team Effectiveness Info: http://www.unstuck.com/
      • The Wisdom of Teams, Jon Katzenbach and Douglas Smith Team Effectiveness
      • The Five Dysfunctions of a Team, Patrick Lencioni Team Effectiveness
    • 120. Next steps
      • Complete feedback
      • Post thoughts and observations to the teaming blog
      • Teach your fellow classmates what you learned here today
    • 121. Thank you ! Namaste *Apologies to my favorite fake blogger, FSJ
    • 122. Extras for those that love death by PowerPoint
    • 123. Collaboration tools 20 minutes
    • 124. Types of tools
      • Internet messaging
      • VOIP software
      • Group chat
      • Group presentation
      • Group collaboration
      • Email
      • Notification systems
    • 125. Process matters most
      • Pick a tool set for your team and stick with it
      • Templates or custom?
      • In Design or PowerPoint?
      • Version control
      • Workflow
      • Fonts
      • Copyright
    • 126. Project management basics 20 minutes
    • 127. Project management truth
      • Project management is not a sacred art
      • The simpler the view of what we do, the more power and focus we can have in accomplishing things
      • Simple doesn’t mean easy
      Source: The Art of Project Management
    • 128. On schedules
      • Schedules have three purposes:
      • They allow the team to make commitments about when something will get done.
      • Encourage everyone to understand that their individual effort is part of a whole and that it requires her investment to make her contributions work with others
      • They give the team a tool with which to track progress and break work into manageable chunks
      Source: The Art of Project Management
    • 129. Making schedules work
      • Milestone length should match project volatility
      • Be optimistic in the vision and skeptical in the schedule
      • Bet on design
      • Plan checkpoints for add/cut discussions
      • Inform and get the team aligned around planning methodology
      • Collectively gauge the team’s experience with the problem space
      • Collectively gauge the teams confidence and experience in working together
      • Take on risks early
      Source: The Art of Project Management
    • 130. Time management basics 20 minutes
    • 131. Meetings…
      • Will get you in trouble if…
      • You let them break up your natural workflow and interrupt commitments that require you to work individually
      • They focus too much on words, abstract concepts and things that aren’t real that are discussed without structures and frameworks to guide the conversation.
      • The require no preparation on your part or other participants in the meeting
      • They are convened without an agenda that is distributed before hand
      Source: Getting Real
    • 132. Personal Time Management
      • Understand the basic concepts of GTD
      • Identify all the stuff in your life that isn’t in the right place (close all open loops)
      • Get rid of the stuff that isn’t yours or you don’t need right now
      • Create a right place that you trust and that supports your working style and values
      • Put your stuff in the right place, consistently
      • Do your stuff in a way that honors your time, your energy, and the context of any given moment
      • Iterate and re-factor mercilessly
      Source: DIYPlanner.com
    • 133. How GTD works Source: Getting Thinks Done
    • 134. End