W4A 2010 Education Tool to Support the Educational Process Chris Bailey

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W4A 2010 Educatioal Tool to Support the Evaluation Process

W4A 2010 Educatioal Tool to Support the Evaluation Process

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  • This slide contains a screenshot of the application if I am unable to demonstrate tool.
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  • 1. Christopher Bailey Dr. Elaine Pearson Teesside University [email_address] An Educational Tool to Support the Accessibility Evaluation Process
  • 2. Main Issues
    • Guide novice auditors through an evaluation, raise awareness of accessibility.
    • Compile a detailed list of checks based on testing for well known accessibility principles
    • Support a contextual approach to evaluation.
    • Our students need support with accessibility:
      • Little existing knowledge of accessibility
      • Develop live websites for specific audiences
      • Accessibility personally a low priority
      • Limited access to disabled end users
      • Limited access to expert reviewers
  • 3. Functionality (1)
    • The tool lists accessibility checks based on three evaluation contexts:
      • User Group
      • Site Features
      • Check Categories
    • For each check, the tool:
      • States the impact the issue has on users
      • Provides instructions on how to perform each check
      • Assists auditor in interpreting result of any automated check
      • Includes a video ‘how to’ walkthrough
  • 4. Functionality (2)
    • Auditor records results of checks as they progress.
    • Print a template, or completed evaluation report.
    • Supports multiple users
    • Supports multiple site evaluations.
    • User can save/retrieve evaluations.
  • 5. Evaluate by User Group
    • Auditor views prioritised checks for one user group
    • Compare different requirements of two user groups.
    • Importance of check is dynamic:
      • Critical Checks: Complete barrier, significant annoyance to user.
      • Important Checks: Noticeable annoyance or inconvenience
    • Allows auditor to see commonalities, but also identify exceptions.
  • 6.
    • Utilises the full database of checks, supporting the concept of universal accessibility
    • Checks are grouped to make process simpler and intuitive
      • Design Checks: overall visual design, e.g.: colour contrast
      • User Checks: testing with a human element, e.g.: keyboard accessibility, image text alternatives
      • Structural Checks: structure of web pages, e.g.: semantic HTML
      • Technical Checks: coding elements, e.g.: valid mark-up, metadata
      • Core Checks: Overall accessibility of site, e.g.: site map, accessibility statement
    • Considers roles in web development team
    Evaluate by Check Categories
  • 7. Evaluate by Site Features
    • Auditor selects elements of their site they wish to check, e.g.: data tables, forms.
    • Auditor selects content features of their website, e.g.: video files.
    • Checks are tailored to content of website:
      • Prioritises relevant checks
      • Streamlines process
      • Increases relevance
      • Eliminates redundancy.
  • 8. Future Work
    • “ Dogfooding” – Create accessible RIA
    • Further development of tool over next 2-3 months.
    • Used for teaching Post Graduate students.
    • Expanded to include checks for other contexts, e.g.: WCAG 2.0, Mobile Devices, RIAs.
    • Test the performance of the tool:
      • Is it effective?
      • Are results consistent?
      • Compare with existing evaluation methods.
  • 9. Christopher Bailey Dr. Elaine Pearson Teesside University [email_address] An Educational Tool to Support the Accessibility Evaluation Process
  • 10. AEA Interface (1)
    • Example comparison of high priority checks for Dyslexia and Screen Reader User groups.
  • 11. AEA Interface (2)
    • For each check the following information is provided:
      • Why the check is necessary
      • Step by step instructions on how to carry out the check
      • A video walkthrough
  • 12. AEA Interface (3)
    • The AEA contains an integrated reporting mechanism so the auditor can record their results as they complete an evaluation.