The Big Picture
M ELISSA’ S MESSAGE ...“One of the advantages, apart from being EU‐based    ourselves, is a lot of our members are Europea...
SSC       AIMS :        W HAT ’ S         RELEVANT             #1?Promote sustainable seafood consumptionEncourage UK cons...
SSC     AIMS :        W HAT ’ S          RELEVANT              #2?Require fishermen, where possible, to collect catch and ...
A IMS     OF THE PRESENTATION1.   To consider competition law and the implications for      companies that collaborate wit...
C ONTENT1.   Drivers of change2.   Competition Law3.   Other approaches and their governance4.   Case studies: Voluntary s...
The drivers and issues move fast…
T HE GLOBAL ECONOMY  Time
C ONSUMER SPENDINGTime
C ONSUMER CONFIDENCE   Time
11                                 A GRI -F OOD T RADE F LOWS                                                             ...
More spent on brand integrity than on         development aid.Anti global NGOs paint everything blackName and shame = knee...
THE RETAILERS ARE IN                         CHARGEHartman Group 2010
THE TOP 10 FOOD RETAILERS                          Rank   Company        Food Sales,   Banner Sales,    Grocery           ...
The public debate
The institutional debate
Trust
Competition Law
2: C OMPETITION L AWThis law promotes and maintains market competition by regulating anti‐competitive conductKnown in the ...
ANTITRUST GUIDELINES :                                                       E XAMPLEThe Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oi...
3: O THER        APPROACHES AND                    THEIR GOVERNANCEa)   Multi stakeholder organisations ‐ Roundtablesb)   ...
PROLIFERATION
M ORE        ON      G OVERNANCE                 OF    COLLABORATIVE APPROACHESA balanced and effective decision making bo...
3( A ) M ULTI             STAKEHOLDER                              ORGANISATIONSThey “have emerged in response to    gover...
R OUNDTABLESPALM OIL AND SOY  Started after Migros contacted Bruno Manser in 1999 – he   then involved WWF. In December 20...
R OUNDTABLES :                          WHAT ’ S GOODBecause they are multi stakeholder initiatives, they bring credibilit...
R OUNDTABLES :      WHAT ’ S NOT SO GOOD #1•   The commitments of participants must be clear     with a robust framework f...
R OUNDTABLES :         WHAT ’ S NOT SO GOOD #2•     Complaints procedures have tended to be weak•     Avoidance  of the ef...
R OUNDTABLES :            WHAT ’ S NOT SO GOOD #3•     Some initiatives have ignored or marginalized workers,       trade ...
R OUNDTABLES :              WHAT ’ S NOT SO GOOD #4•      Slow uptake and small market share ‐ MSC and FSC•      Focused o...
3( B ) ISEAL
3( C )      BUSINESS APPROACH         WITH NON PROFIT ADVICEGLOBAL SOCIAL COMPLIANCE PROGRAMME  The GSCP is ultimately wor...
B USINESS          DRIVEN                        HARMONISATIONGLOBAL SOCIAL COMPLIANCE PROGRAMME   There are variations in...
GSCP G OVERNANCE   MODEL
3( D ) B USINESS                    DRIVEN                                     APPROACH                  #1INTERNATIONAL D...
3( D ) B USINESS                DRIVEN                                 APPROACH                #2SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE I...
3( E )      INTERNATIONAL                           ORGANISATIONSGS1 is the most popular supply chain standards system glo...
4         C ASE         STUDIES :                  FSC & MSC                                    P ROGRESS              SO ...
W HAT ’ S BEEN LEARNT #1STANDARD SETTING (from Twenty Fifty Ltd)   Standards that are realistic clear and provide a good b...
W HAT ’ S BEEN LEARNT #2IMPLEMENTATION  A clear understanding of expectations related direct and indirect impacts  Good pr...
W HAT ’ S BEEN LEARNT #3                    HARMONISATIONEIGHT POLICY STEPS1.   The business case must be agreed by the CE...
W HAT ’ S BEEN LEARNT #4                      HARMONISATIONEIGHT PROCESS STEPS1.   Harmonisation is not about setting new ...
5
Checklist for failurePoor decision makingComplexity in approachMajor players absent
Checklist for successSenior supportTransparency and honestyAlignment of buying with CSR
A IMS     OF THE PRESENTATION1.   To consider competition law and the implications for      companies that collaborate wit...
I TS   NOT JUST WHAT YOU CONSUME ...  ITS ALSO HOW IT WAS PRODUCED               Better ingredients...            Away fro...
The Big Picture September 2011
The Big Picture September 2011
The Big Picture September 2011
The Big Picture September 2011
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

The Big Picture September 2011

204
-1

Published on

Title: “The Big Picture: Global collaboration between companies for sustainability”
A two hour session. We don't want to get technical; we want to educate and give them some information they can take back home. The approach will be robust, critical and frank. I will share my knowledge of working within a number of global collaborations with a strict agreement that the Chatham House Rule will bind the members.
The aims of this presentation will be:
• To consider competition law and the implications for companies that collaborate with their competitors
• To inform the group of the various approaches around the world that have tackled collaborative working on sustainability issues. Included would be a look at their various approaches to governance.
• To share case studies of groups that have worked to set up voluntary codes or standards
• To build understanding of success and failure, barriers to change, what needs to happen.
• To facilitate a discussion on lessons for the SSC.

Published in: Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
204
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

The Big Picture September 2011

  1. 1. The Big Picture
  2. 2. M ELISSA’ S MESSAGE ...“One of the advantages, apart from being EU‐based  ourselves, is a lot of our members are European  or international organizations. I would say the  UK is the most progressive nation in seafood and  that it will be more difficult rolling SSC out in  Europe, but we will have something that works to  take forward. For those international  companies, it will surely be a lot less daunting if  their UK representative has already done it.”
  3. 3. SSC AIMS : W HAT ’ S RELEVANT #1?Promote sustainable seafood consumptionEncourage UK consumers to eat a wider variety of sustainable seafood, and to introduce species to its stores and restaurants that are currently underutilized or discardedSupport the sustainable use of unwanted discarded species’ trimmings and offal in the manufacture of fishmealUse harmonized seafood labeling based on agreed standards to provide consumers with accurate information on sustainability
  4. 4. SSC AIMS : W HAT ’ S RELEVANT #2?Require fishermen, where possible, to collect catch and discard information for the seafood sourced by coalition members and pass this information to government authorities for use in scientific assessmentsAdhere to a new voluntary industry code of conduct agreed by the coalition until sufficient management measures and labeling rules are in placeInfluence changes in policy at UK, EU and international levelBuild national and global alliancesInform the public on seafood
  5. 5. A IMS OF THE PRESENTATION1. To consider competition law and the implications for  companies that collaborate with their competitors2. To inform the group of the various approaches  around the world that have tackled collaborative  working on sustainability issues. 3. To share case studies of groups that have worked to  set up voluntary codes or standards4. To build understanding of success and failure, barriers  to change, what needs to happen.5. To facilitate a discussion on lessons for the SSC.
  6. 6. C ONTENT1. Drivers of change2. Competition Law3. Other approaches and their governance4. Case studies: Voluntary standards5. Success and failure... The barriers to change
  7. 7. The drivers and issues move fast…
  8. 8. T HE GLOBAL ECONOMY Time
  9. 9. C ONSUMER SPENDINGTime
  10. 10. C ONSUMER CONFIDENCE Time
  11. 11. 11 A GRI -F OOD T RADE F LOWS (SELECTED COUNTRIES, 2006 , US$ M ILLION) 466 China Canada 658 3,476 12,336 14,237 2,151 607 71 United States 135 534 1,942 8,079 141 8,619 69 Brazil Mexico 5* Note: Used SITC (Rev. 3) 01 (Food and live animals) category; China includes Hong Kong and Macao, SAR; trade between Canada and Brazil, and China and Mexico is not presented for brevity’s sake (each amounts to smaller than US$400 Million); Based on the exporting country’s reports. Source: UN Comtrade
  12. 12. More spent on brand integrity than on development aid.Anti global NGOs paint everything blackName and shame = knee jerk behaviour Product integrity now competitive
  13. 13. THE RETAILERS ARE IN CHARGEHartman Group 2010
  14. 14. THE TOP 10 FOOD RETAILERS Rank Company Food Sales, Banner Sales,  Grocery  €bn €bn % 1 Wal‐Mart 214 330 65 2 Carrefour 88 112 78 3 Tesco 56 75 75 4 Schwarz  54 63 85 Group 5 Kroger 49 57 86 6 Aldi 49 54 90 7 Walgreens 48 52 93 8 Seven & I 44 62 71 9 AEON 43 54 80Source: Planet Retail: 2009  10 Rewe Group 43 49 89
  15. 15. The public debate
  16. 16. The institutional debate
  17. 17. Trust
  18. 18. Competition Law
  19. 19. 2: C OMPETITION L AWThis law promotes and maintains market competition by regulating anti‐competitive conductKnown in the United States as ‘antitrust’ lawIn Europe there are 4 main policy areas:  Cartels, Monopolies, Mergers, State AidWhen working together on sustainability policy, competition law should not apply See notes on Treaty on the functioning of the  European Union, Article 101 and 102 
  20. 20. ANTITRUST GUIDELINES : E XAMPLEThe Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil  Participation in RSPO is voluntary. No one will be pressured to  participate in it. Members of RSPO shall remain free at all times to join other initiatives  on sustainable agriculture and shall not be limited in any respect in the  ways they decide to conduct their business. Membership of RSPO shall be open to all companies/organisations  within the membership categories specified in its Statutes and By‐laws. RSPO will not be used in any manner as a vehicle for participating  companies/organisations or individuals to discuss or seek agreement on  any of the subjects mentioned under paragraph C) herein. (see notes)    It is important to keep in mind that no formal agreement needs to be  reached to run afoul of antitrust or competition laws. No competitively sensitive information will be exchanged among RSPO  members.
  21. 21. 3: O THER APPROACHES AND THEIR GOVERNANCEa) Multi stakeholder organisations ‐ Roundtablesb) The International Social and Environmental  Accreditation and Labeling Alliance ‐ ISEALc) Business driven approaches with non‐profit  adviced) Business driven approachese) International organisations
  22. 22. PROLIFERATION
  23. 23. M ORE ON G OVERNANCE OF COLLABORATIVE APPROACHESA balanced and effective decision making body,  supported by a secretariat • A decision making body is required• Participants can be elected, chosen or volunteered  depending on the needs of the organisation. • However the composition is arrived at, it should  reflect the interests of the different stakeholder  groups. • A permanent secretariat that can execute the  wishes of the decision making body will help  enable consistent progress.   
  24. 24. 3( A ) M ULTI STAKEHOLDER ORGANISATIONSThey “have emerged in response to  governance gaps in which regulatory,  judicial, and broader economic and  political systems have failed” John Ruggie, Special Representative of the Secretary‐General of  the United Nations (SRSG)Improving the human rights performance of business through  multi‐stakeholder initiatives: summary report, November  6th‐7th 2007
  25. 25. R OUNDTABLESPALM OIL AND SOY Started after Migros contacted Bruno Manser in 1999 – he  then involved WWF. In December 2001, the first  sustainable palm oil was imported by Migros from Ghana In 2002 others became involved including Sainsbury’s and  Unilever In 2004 the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil was  formed In 2005 the Roundtable for Responsible Soy was formed by  WWF, Monsanto, Cargill and others
  26. 26. R OUNDTABLES : WHAT ’ S GOODBecause they are multi stakeholder initiatives, they bring credibility, accountability and transparency in the supply chain by bringing the different actors to the tableThe agreement of voluntary production standardsThe outputs are more likely to work as all key actors of the supply chain are engagedThey can reach across frontiers and truly tackle global problemsThey can evolve into independent certification systems to facilitate responsible purchasing World Wide Fund for Nature Conservation (WWF)
  27. 27. R OUNDTABLES : WHAT ’ S NOT SO GOOD #1• The commitments of participants must be clear  with a robust framework for compliance. • Without clarity and the ability to hold companies  to account, voluntary initiatives can become little  more than public relations tools for some of their  participants. • Legislation is also necessary to protect human  rights and ensure a level playing field for  companies. Amnesty International
  28. 28. R OUNDTABLES : WHAT ’ S NOT SO GOOD #2• Complaints procedures have tended to be weak• Avoidance  of the effective tactic of negative publicity  to exert pressure on large corporations.• Multiple weak, ineffective collaboration in the same  sector dilutes focus and resources • Strong, dominant organisations with high compliance  costs can become a barrier to entry for small and  medium enterprises, a particular problem for firms in  the global south.  Peter Utting, Deputy Director of United Nations Research  Institute for Social Development (UNRISD)
  29. 29. R OUNDTABLES : WHAT ’ S NOT SO GOOD #3• Some initiatives have ignored or marginalized workers,  trade unions and local level monitoring  organizations • Scaling up monitoring and verification procedures can be  extremely complex and costly• Reporting can be unreliable due to the reluctance of both  workers and management to communicate openly and  honestly on certain issues, and the typically short  timeframe of any monitoring exercise. • Reliance by some schemes on commercial auditing and  consulting firms raises serious problems regarding quality  and cost. Peter Utting, Deputy Director of United Nations Research Institute for  Social Development (UNRISD)
  30. 30. R OUNDTABLES : WHAT ’ S NOT SO GOOD #4• Slow uptake and small market share ‐ MSC and FSC• Focused on international markets – what about much larger  domestic and regional trade?• One tool in the toolbox – without proper governance by  governments and multilateral agencies, it will be an uphill  battle• Coalition of the active – engagement is resource hungry so  become exclusionary• Acknowledgement of limitations – its important to be clear  about what can and can’t be delivered. Certification and roundtables: do they work? A WWF review of multi  stakeholder sustainability initiatives September 2010
  31. 31. 3( B ) ISEAL
  32. 32. 3( C ) BUSINESS APPROACH WITH NON PROFIT ADVICEGLOBAL SOCIAL COMPLIANCE PROGRAMME The GSCP is ultimately working towards remediation of root  causes to non‐compliances, aiming at supplier ownership of  solutions and their implementation. Founded in 2005 to tackle the challenges of duplication and  lack of impact on labour standards in supply chains.  It aims to harmonise existing efforts in delivering a shared,  global and sustainable approach for continuous  improvement of working conditions in the global supply  chain. In 2009 they went beyond social issues when they  published their “Draft Reference Environmental Framework  Requirements”. It’s specific to processing and is an  important step forward for harmonisation.
  33. 33. B USINESS DRIVEN HARMONISATIONGLOBAL SOCIAL COMPLIANCE PROGRAMME There are variations in social and environmental  compliance standards, audit methodology and  requirements for auditing competence The Equivalence Process, launched in 2011, will  help companies and initiatives overcome this by  allowing them to benchmark their systems, tools  and processes against agreed best existing  practice as described in the GSCP reference tools
  34. 34. GSCP G OVERNANCE MODEL
  35. 35. 3( D ) B USINESS DRIVEN APPROACH #1INTERNATIONAL DAIRY FEDERATION The only example of a genuinely global alliance for an agricultural  commodity representing 86% of the world’s total milk production. In Berlin in September 2009, seven organisations including the IDF,  signed the ‘Global Dairy Agenda for Action’. It includes A pledge to  reduce carbon emissions as a part of its contribution to help  address global warming.  The agreement represents a crucial step forward for an industry  that contributes 3% of global greenhouse gas emissions, 80% of  which are on the farm.  The scope of their work includes the processing and packaging of  dairy products, but not the distribution and retailing. There is current work on a harmonised carbon footprint system  which means that 85% of the world’s farmers could have a shared  approach.
  36. 36. 3( D ) B USINESS DRIVEN APPROACH #2SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE INITIATIVE  PLATFORM SAI Platform is an organisation based in Europe but with  global membership. It has been created by the brand manufacturers to  facilitate worldwide communication and involve  stakeholders in developing sustainable agriculture. SAI Platform supports agricultural practices and  production systems that preserve the future availability of  current resources and enhances their efficiency.
  37. 37. 3( E ) INTERNATIONAL ORGANISATIONSGS1 is the most popular supply chain standards system globally. One of its important features is a global IT reference system.ISO launches new standards according to demand from stakeholders and sectors. An ISO standard is a living agreement with criteria and technical specifications. Of note is ISO 14063:2006 (Environmental communication).OECD brings together democratic countries’ governments to help them gain prosperity and eliminate poverty through economic growth and financial stability. Their key indicators include fish resources.Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) is the world’s most widely used company reporting framework for sustainability A multi stakeholder organisation, its third generation is referred to as the ‘G3 Guidelines’ and was released in 2006.
  38. 38. 4 C ASE STUDIES : FSC & MSC P ROGRESS SO FAR Scheme Started Market share Harvest share FSC 1993 12% 8.4% MSC 1999 50% whitefish 4.1% 0.05% tuna 7.1% of all  catch MULTISTAKEHOLDER SUSTAINABILITY INITIATIVES Initial outcomes of a WWF review study 2011 Mireille Perrin Decorzent mperrin@wwfint.org
  39. 39. W HAT ’ S BEEN LEARNT #1STANDARD SETTING (from Twenty Fifty Ltd) Standards that are realistic clear and provide a good basis for  implementation Strong normative content, relating to UN, OECD or other  international standards Standards that are not dominated by legal considerations alone  – as simple and as concrete as possible Engaging interested parties beyond the core participant group Setting expectations on participation, verification and  reporting Strong public commitments from all stakeholders
  40. 40. W HAT ’ S BEEN LEARNT #2IMPLEMENTATION A clear understanding of expectations related direct and indirect impacts Good promotion of the standard Evolution of the governance structure to support local implementation Development of practical guidance to aid implementation Establishing multi‐stakeholder collaboration at the country or local level A strong secretariat – with independence and ability to mobilise all  stakeholders (in particular governments) and to govern participation  criteria Continuing political support of home countries internationally and in  producer countries, as facilitators and honest and skilled brokers Continuing ethos of leadership: effective sector pillars but also specific  actors who are willing to lead troubleshooting.
  41. 41. W HAT ’ S BEEN LEARNT #3 HARMONISATIONEIGHT POLICY STEPS1. The business case must be agreed by the CEOs.2. The top companies must all be involved.3. The facilitation must be seen as neutral and the organisation at the centre  must not benefit from the process.4. Confidentiality must be formalised.5. Decision making should be unanimous.6. All companies should aspire to best practice, which is never static. Due to  global variability this cannot be delivered meaning supply chain expectations  must be realistic.7. The top companies must deliver on policy convergence. However, progress will  never be even, so stories of success and failure must be shared.8. A genuine multi stakeholder process may slow progress significantly. If it is not  in place, the views of stakeholders must be sought and their contribution  valued. Without their support, harmonisation will itself be slowed. 
  42. 42. W HAT ’ S BEEN LEARNT #4 HARMONISATIONEIGHT PROCESS STEPS1. Harmonisation is not about setting new standards, it is about bringing  together what already exist. 2. Project management skills in facilitation will accelerate progress.3. All communication must be consistent and transparent.4. Competence in working groups is important, so practical experience is  required.5. The realities of business means individuals will have time constraints.  Therefore, facilitation should ensure workload for participants is realistic.6. Agreement on both good and best practice must include stakeholder  consultation.7. A central reference approach must be agreed to provides a list of essential  requirements8. Schemes should be allowed reasonable transition periods for adaptation  before new company requirements are enforced.
  43. 43. 5
  44. 44. Checklist for failurePoor decision makingComplexity in approachMajor players absent
  45. 45. Checklist for successSenior supportTransparency and honestyAlignment of buying with CSR
  46. 46. A IMS OF THE PRESENTATION1. To consider competition law and the implications for  companies that collaborate with their competitors2. To inform the group of the various approaches  around the world that have tackled collaborative  working on sustainability issues. 3. To share case studies of groups that have worked to  set up voluntary codes or standards4. To build understanding of success and failure, barriers  to change, what needs to happen.5. To facilitate a discussion on lessons for the SSC.
  47. 47. I TS NOT JUST WHAT YOU CONSUME ... ITS ALSO HOW IT WAS PRODUCED Better ingredients... Away from price buying... towards integrity and authenticity
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×