The jujutsu of introducing usability to an organization
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The jujutsu of introducing usability to an organization

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Mark Maxted of Blue Coat Systems describes how understanding the "readiness" of an organization can affect your tactics for introducing usability and user-centered design. More info at ...

Mark Maxted of Blue Coat Systems describes how understanding the "readiness" of an organization can affect your tactics for introducing usability and user-centered design. More info at www.chopsticker.com

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  • Normally, when I talk about useability, I'm giving a sales pitch, talking about process, techniques, metrics and the like. But then I'm not usually talking to the converted. What can I say to people who are already practitioners? Rather than present a war story or case study, I thought it might be worth stepping back and looking at a larger context.

The jujutsu of introducing usability to an organization The jujutsu of introducing usability to an organization Presentation Transcript

  • Organizational Readiness
      • mark maxted
      • Senior Principal Engineer
      • Blue Coat Systems
    Tactics for Success
  • Motivations
    • Why do usability initiatives so often meet with only qualified success?
    • Why did a technique I used with great success at one company fail miserably at the next?
    • Why am I so frustrated?
  • Dimensions of Readiness
    • Technical
    • Process
    • Cultural
    • Product/Market
  • Technical Readiness
    • How flexible is the underlying architecture?
      • How often do you hear “we'd have to change our architecture” in an engineering response?
      • Can you easily change data presentations?
      • Is business logic separated from the workflow?
      • How many interfaces do you have to support?
    • How agile is your interface toolkit?
    • Low: business logic and presentation intertwined and hard coded.
    • High: well layered, “evolvable” UI technology
  • Architectural Readiness concrete user interfaces abstract interface virtual machine features and services platform platform independence application/ business logic
  • Process Readiness
    • Are corporate processes (and the process to change them) well defined ?
    • Do they incorporate usability?
      • What is the process for generating product requirements?
      • Who owns the lexicon?
    • Are processes for UI and underlying technologies distinct?
    • Low: ad hoc processes, requirements expressed as features, individual engineers dictate terminology
    • High: requirements expressed as use stories
  • Cultural Readiness
    • Technophilia vs Interdisciplinary Respect
      • We don't know what we don't know
      • People who don't know this aren't ready
        • Use ad hoc demonstrations
    • Do QA and Customer Service have a say in requirements? What role does Docs play?
    • Low: engineering claims “we know our users”
    • Medium: usability is about panel design
    • High: focus is on end to end customer experience
  • Product/Market Readiness
    • Emerging technologies and markets are feature driven
      • Audiences are poorly defined
      • Management reacts to early adopters
    • Mature technologies are solution driven
      • Audiences are better defined
      • Management can turn down “distractions”
  • Tactical Summary
    • Do's
      • assess your organization's readiness
      • recognize inertia
      • have realistic expectations
      • be patient and adaptable
      • develop a roadmap
      • exploit opportunities to fund your roadmap
    • Don'ts
      • act too far ahead of your organization's readiness
      • try to change too many things at once
      • spread yourself too thin.
  •