U.S. Airport  Green Initiatives
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Compiled list of United States Airports "green" cost saving initiatives gathered from a web search. Completed Summer 2010 as a Summer Intern for Indianapolis Airport Authority.

Compiled list of United States Airports "green" cost saving initiatives gathered from a web search. Completed Summer 2010 as a Summer Intern for Indianapolis Airport Authority.

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U.S. Airport Green Initiatives Document Transcript

  • 1. Green Initiatives of Other Airports June 14, 2010 By Chris Homko
  • 2. Table of ContentsTable of Contents....................................................................................................2Introduction.............................................................................................................5Airport Green Initiatives..........................................................................................5 Port Authority of NY/NJ (EWR, JFK, TEB, SWF).........................................................5 Consumer Recycling ...................................................................................................5 Delay Reduction Measures..........................................................................................5 LED Airfield Lighting.................................................................................................5 Airport Noise Programs...............................................................................................5 Facility Improvement Measures at JFK.......................................................................6 Infrared Deicing at JFK...............................................................................................6 Energy Efficiency at Newark Liberty .........................................................................6 Solar Photovoltaic Installation.....................................................................................6 Stewart Airport.............................................................................................................6 Aircraft Gate Power Project at Stewart........................................................................6 Stewart International Airport’s Sustainability Plan.....................................................7 Massport (BOS, BED, ORH)...........................................................................................7 BOS Terminal A awarded LEED certification (August 2006)....................................7 Rochester NY (ROC).......................................................................................................8 Brooks Announces Plan for Green Energy at Airport.................................................8 Pittsburgh International (PIT)..........................................................................................8 Orlando International (MCO)........................................................................................10 Tampa International (TPA)............................................................................................11 Water Conservation...................................................................................................11 Clean Air Partnership.................................................................................................11 Recycling...................................................................................................................11 Lighting Solutions......................................................................................................11 Energy Management..................................................................................................11 Good Neighbor - Reducing Noise Pollution..............................................................11 Austin International (AUS)............................................................................................12 Energy Efficiency & Peak Demand Reduction.........................................................12 Efficient & Environmentally Sensitive Use of Raw & Building Materials...............12 Air Quality Initiatives................................................................................................13 Landside Initiatives....................................................................................................13 Airside Initiatives.......................................................................................................13 Water Conservation...................................................................................................14 Water Quality Improvements.....................................................................................14 Environmental Remediation......................................................................................15 Reuse And Recycling.................................................................................................15 Military Housing Relocation......................................................................................16 Existing Fuel Tanks Relocated..................................................................................16 Concrete Recycling....................................................................................................16 Chapel Elements Salvaged.........................................................................................16 Reduced Noise Impact...............................................................................................16 2
  • 3. Community Involvement...........................................................................................17 Archaeological And Historic Preservation................................................................17Chicago Department of Aviation (ORD, MDW, GRY)................................................18 Updates on CDA Sustainable Initiatives O’Hare Modernization Program (OMP)...18Denver International (DEN)..........................................................................................19 Significant Environmental Aspects at DIA................................................................19 What we recycle at DEN:..........................................................................................20 Page 2: DIA was Built with the Environment in Mind..............................................20 Page 3: DIA’s Environmental Recognition...............................................................21 Page 4: EMS, Greenprint Denver, and Climate Action Plan Goals...........................21 Page 6: Photovoltaics at DIA.....................................................................................21 Page 7: Energy and Emission Reduction Projects.....................................................21 Page 9: System Improvements (Materials Mangement)............................................22 Page 10: 2009 Report Card........................................................................................22 Page 11: Sustainability makes Cents.........................................................................22Phoenix Sky Harbor (PHX)...........................................................................................22 Green Initiatives.........................................................................................................22 Recycling and Waste Reduction................................................................................23 Energy Conservation..................................................................................................24Salt Lake City International (SLC)................................................................................25 Recycling...................................................................................................................25 Water conservation....................................................................................................25 Alternative Fuels........................................................................................................25 Use of Technology.....................................................................................................26 Wildlife Mitigation....................................................................................................26San Diego International (SAN)......................................................................................27 Airport Master Plan....................................................................................................27 The Green Build: Moving Forward, Soaring Higher ................................................27 Land Use Compatibility.............................................................................................27 Regional Aviation Strategic Plan...............................................................................28 Noise..........................................................................................................................28 Environmental............................................................................................................28Long Beach Airport CA (LGB).....................................................................................28 Air Quality.................................................................................................................29 Energy Conservation..................................................................................................29 Solar Energy...............................................................................................................29 Storm Water...............................................................................................................30Los Angles World Airports (LAX, ONT, VNY)...........................................................30 Slide 9: Current Environmental Initiatives................................................................31 Slide 12: Energy Conservation and Green Power......................................................31 Slide 13: Source Reduction and Recycling Programs...............................................31 Slide 14: Water Conservation and Management Programs.......................................31Burbank CA Bob Hope Airport (BUR).........................................................................31 Sustainability..............................................................................................................31 Clean Air Program.....................................................................................................32 Diesel Buses...............................................................................................................32 3
  • 4. LEED Compliant Hangar...........................................................................................32 Waste Disposal Improvements..................................................................................32 Energy Efficient Measures.........................................................................................32 Las Vegas McCarran International (LAS).....................................................................32 Taxiing to a Sustainable Future (Pages 5-6).............................................................33 San Jose International (SJC)..........................................................................................33 Air Quality Measures.................................................................................................33 San Francisco International (SFO).................................................................................35 Sustainable Products..................................................................................................35 Native Plants..............................................................................................................35 Energy Efficiency......................................................................................................35 Energy Management and Control System.................................................................36 Traffic Reduction and Air Quality.............................................................................36 Oakland CA International (OAK)..................................................................................37 Air Quality and Alternative Fuels..............................................................................37 Compressed Natural Gas............................................................................................37 Rechargeable Batteries...............................................................................................38 Ground Service Equipment Alternative Fuel Program..............................................38 Solar Energy...............................................................................................................38 Ground Power and Pre-Conditioned Air Loading Bridges for Aircraft....................39 Trip Reduction Program............................................................................................39 BART-OAK Intermodal Connector (BART Connector)...........................................39 Bicycle Access...........................................................................................................40 LEED Certification....................................................................................................40 Recycling/Waste Reduction.......................................................................................41 In-Terminal Recycling...............................................................................................41 Food Waste Recycling...............................................................................................41 Airline Consolidated Waste and Recycling Program................................................41 Airline Pillow Recycling............................................................................................41 Portland OR (PDX)........................................................................................................41 Seattle International (SEA)............................................................................................42 Port of Seattle Commission Approves Design for Green Project at Sea-Tac Airport to Reduce Air Emissions and Save Millions in Fuel Costs ......................................42Recommendations................................................................................................44 4
  • 5. IntroductionThe following is a compendium of green initiatives at airports that are either being usedor planning to be used. The method used to obtain such information will precede the text.Airport Green InitiativesPort Authority of NY/NJ (EWR, JFK, TEB,SWF)The following is from: http://www.panynj.gov/about/airport-initiatives.htmlConsumer RecyclingA variety of recycling activities are already in place at Port Authority airports. The PortAuthority recycles over 500 tons of cardboard, more than 40 tons of cans, bottles andglass, more than 130 tons of mixed paper, and almost 7,000 tons of construction debriseach year. We are building on these efforts by establishing a comprehensive recyclingpolicy and program for all of our airports. A major part of the program is theestablishment or improvement of public area recycling in the passenger terminals.Delay Reduction MeasuresReducing aircraft delays helps to reduce the amount of fuel that aircraft use, and thatresults in reduced greenhouse gas and air pollutant emissions. We are pursuing a varietyof measures that will improve on-time performance, including a Ground BasedAugmentation System (GPS navigation) at Newark Liberty, an Aerobahn groundsurveillance system at JFK, and taxiway modifications and additions at JFK. We are alsosupporting implementation of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen),which will lead to more efficient operations and improvements to environmentalperformance.LED Airfield LightingWe have installed or are in the process of installing energy-efficient LED taxiway andholdbar lights at JFK, Newark Liberty, and Stewart International Airport. We will betesting the feasibility of these mixed lighting systems at our airports to conserve energy.Airport Noise ProgramsThe Port Authority has worked for many years to reduce the impact of aircraft noise onthe residential areas around its airports. Noise reduction measures include a noise limiton aircraft takeoffs; the use of preferential runway systems; approach and departureprocedures that reduce overflights of residential areas; a voluntary ban on Stage II aircraftoperations at Teterboro Airport; a voluntary overnight curfew on aircraft operations atTeterboro and LaGuardia Airports; the overnight closure of LaGuardia Airport during the 5
  • 6. summer; and ground runup restrictions. The Port Authority also operates an AircraftNoise Abatement Monitoring System to monitor airline compliance with noise abatementprocedures. As a result of these programs, coupled with the required use of quieter StageIII/IV aircraft, the number of people living in FAA-defined noise affected areas near theairports has decreased by more than 90 percent.The Port Authority works closely with communities and elected officials throughout theregion with regard to aircraft noise and other airport issues. The Port Authority has alsoimplemented a school-soundproofing program, under which 53 schools in New York andNew Jersey have been soundproofed to date. In addition, soundproofing is under way orunder design review for 25 schools. Soundproofing has reduced aircraft noise levels byat least 50 percent in the classroom.Facility Improvement Measures at JFKIn 2008, we completed energy efficiency work at several buildings at JFK. Facilityimprovements included: installation of energy efficient lighting controls, installation ofinfrared heaters and controls, decommissioning of vacant buildings, anddecommissioning of a high-pressure steam plant.Infrared Deicing at JFKWe have installed an infrared deicing facility at JFK. The facility is sized to deice aBoeing 747-400 aircraft. De-icing with the infrared system reduces the amount ofdeicing fluids used by 90 percent per aircraft.Energy Efficiency at Newark LibertyWe have taken a number of improvements to energy efficiency. The airport has installedmeters to monitor peak loads; conducted a specialized review of Terminal B to ensurethat its energy system is operating as it should; re-wired circuits to allow lighting to beshut off when it is not needed; and modified its operational practices to conserve energy.Solar Photovoltaic InstallationWe have evaluated facilities and structures at Newark Liberty International Airport toidentify those with the greatest potential for solar photovoltaic panels. We are alsoexploring the installation of a 700-kilowatt solar array and are currently developing thespecifications for the system with the intent to engage developers for systemimplementationStewart AirportAircraft Gate Power Project at StewartStewart International Airport received a grant under the FAA’s Voluntary Airport LowEmissions (VALE) program to install electric power and preconditioned air at theairport’s seven gates. This project will allow aircraft at the gate to use airport power andair instead of running their auxiliary power units (APUs), which run on jet fuel and creategreenhouse gases and other air pollutant emissions. These improvements could reduce 6
  • 7. air pollutant emissions by about 96 tons over the life of the project. The New YorkPower Authority is also a funding partner for this project.Stewart International Airport’s Sustainability PlanStewart International Airport is developing a comprehensive sustainability plan. Theplan will include goals, objectives and strategies to help the airport operate sustainablyand minimize its impact on the environment. Over the long term, the study will also helpguide operational and planning decisions to turn Stewart into a carbon-neutral facility.Massport (BOS, BED, ORH)BOS Terminal A awarded LEED certification (August 2006)From press release at: http://www.massport.com/about/press_news_taleed.htmlLEED Certification was based on a number of green design and construction features thatpositively impact the airport and the broader community. These benefits include: • Special storm water filtration devices to remove total suspended solids and total phosphorous from site run off. • Roofing membrane and paving to reflect heat from the building and thus limit the heat island effect that can raise temperatures in urban area by as much as 10 degrees. This also helps lower the cooling demand on the mechanical systems in the peak summer months, saving energy. • Drip irrigation instead of spray head to reduce the water required for irrigation by at least 50%. Low flow lavatory fixtures and waterless urinals to reduce the water used in the restrooms by more than 30%. • Special low-e glass to reflect heat away from the windows to minimize heat loss in the winter and heat gain in the summer. • Extensive use of daylight and lighting controls which automatically dim lights when ample natural light is available. • More than 75% of the construction and demolition waste was reused, recycled or otherwise diverted from area landfills. • More than 10% of all of the building materials were from recycled materials. • More than 20% of the materials used were manufactured locally. • Special measures were taken during construction to control construction contaminates from adversely affecting indoor air quality. • Adhesives, sealants, paints and carpets were specified to have very low or no volatile organic compounds. • Composite wood materials were specified to use alternative to urea formaldehyde. • Ground service equipment electrification program. • Participation in the Massport-wide recycling program. 7
  • 8. Rochester NY (ROC)From press release at:http://www.monroecounty.gov/brooks_announces_plan_for_green_energy_at_airportBrooks Announces Plan for Green Energy at Airport Monroe County Executive maggie Brooks introduced a referral to the Monroe CountyLegislature that would amend the 2009 operating budget for the County Department ofAviation. The revision would provide funding for a Green Energy Initiatives Project,which will place wind turbines and solar panels on the roof of the Greater RochesterInternational Airport (GRIA). The project will be completed at no cost to Countytaxpayers.“This plan will generate clean, renewable energy for the Greater Rochester InternationalAirport; while cutting energy and operating costs,”said Brooks. “The addition of thesewind turbines and solar panels will also protect future generations by renewing theCounty’s commitment to becoming a more ‘Green’ and sustainable community.”If approved, the Green Energy Initiatives Project at the GRIA would include theinstallation of two dozen, 1000-watt wind turbines and 50,000 square feet of photovoltaicsystem solar panels. The wind turbines are projected to generate 121,000 kilowatt hoursof energy per year, and the solar panels are expected to generate a projected 60,000kilowatt hours of energy annually.Monroe County anticipates that a grant from the New York State Energy Research andDevelopment Authority (NYSERA), an Incentive Award from the NYS Solar-ElectricIncentive Program and other available energy incentive awards will pay for a significantportion of the project. The remainder will be funded by the airlines operating at the GRIAthrough the Monroe County Airport Authority’s Renewal and Replacement Fund.“These proposed ‘Green’ improvements to the Greater Rochester International Airportwill combat high energy prices, keep travel costs low, and protect taxpayers,” saidCounty Legislator Steve Tucciarello (R-Gates/Chili), who also serves on the AirportAuthority. “As a member of the Airport Authority, I am proud to endorse this projectwhich will benefit the airport, travelers and our entire community.”The Monroe County Airport Authority approved the resolution at its March meeting. Ifpassed, the measure would also authorize a contract between the Airport and CloughHarbour & Associates, LLP for design and construction of the wind turbines and solarpanels. The referral will be presented in committee meetings in late April, and then willbe up for vote at the full County Legislature meeting on May 12th.Pittsburgh International (PIT)Source: http://www.pitairport.com/Onorato_Announces_Green_Lighting_Project_at_PITGreen Lighting Project at Pittsburgh International Airport 8
  • 9. August 17, 2009Onorato Announces Green Lighting Project at Pittsburgh International AirportNearly 1,500 lights to be converted to cutting-edge LEDsPITTSBURGH — Allegheny County Executive Dan Onorato today announced that theAllegheny County Airport Authority has been awarded an $800,000 grant by thePennsylvania Energy Development Authority (PEDA) to install LED lighting atPittsburgh International Airport parking lots.“The Airport Authority’s green lighting project is another win-win situation by increasingenergy efficiency and decreasing costs,” said Onorato. “When I launched the AlleghenyGreen initiative, I promised that Allegheny County would lead by example, and we’redoing just that. First we replaced more than 800 lights at the County Jail with high-efficiency LEDs, and now we are replacing nearly 1,500 lights at Pittsburgh InternationalAirport. We will continue to look for ways to operate County facilities more efficientlyand environmentally friendly.”The Airport Authority will use the grant to replace 1,471 existing high-intensitydischarge lights with high-efficiency LED fixtures in the long-term and extended parkinglots and the three-level parking garage of Pittsburgh International Airport.The LED lighting system will consume an estimated 83 percent less energy and result in$158,754 in annual energy savings, with 2,118,438 kWh saved over the project’slifetime. The project will create and preserve 75 well-paying green jobs for AppalachianLighting Systems in Ellwood City, and 75 percent of the LED fixture components areproduced in the United States.“The Allegheny County Airport Authority is committed to conserving energy andreducing the environmental footprint of the airport system,” said Bradley D. Penrod,Executive Director and CEO of the Airport Authority. “This is one of the many effortsunderway to make our operations and facilities greener.”This $800,000 in grant funding comes through the Pennsylvania Department ofEnvironmental Protection from Duquesne Light to assist ratepayers in coping with highenergy costs and to ensure they have a secure energy supply needed for criticaloperations. The total project cost is $1.6 million, and the Authority’s matching funds of$800,000 will come from energy savings from the project over approximately the next 10years.“Past investments have positioned Pennsylvania as a leader in the clean energy industry.The awarding of these grants will help continue that trend,” said Pennsylvania GovernorEdward G. Rendell. “When I first revived PEDA in 2005, the goal was to provide thefunding and the incentives necessary to move these types of projects forward. Now five 9
  • 10. years later, the projects we are funding will make significant impacts in the renewableenergy market and the daily lives of Pennsylvanians.”In March, the County replaced more than 800 incandescent light fixtures at the CountyJail with high-efficiency LED lights, which consume 83 percent less energy and will savetaxpayers $178,000 annually. The cutting-edge, patented fixtures were installed in thepod areas of the jail where lights are required to remain on 24 hours a day.In June, Onorato announced a countywide energy efficiency and conservation programusing $8.1 million in federal stimulus funding. The effort includes a partnership withDuquesne Light to conduct energy audits of municipal buildings in the County, as well asenergy-saving upgrades to County-owned and municipal facilities.Allegheny County and the Airport Authority are both in the process of implementing aGuaranteed Energy Savings Program to further reduce energy consumption.###Allegheny Green is a comprehensive initiative to promote sustainable practices withinCounty government and its authorities and through countywide policies and programs.Appalachian Lighting Systems Inc. (ALSI) specializes in the development andmanufacture of high-powered, ultra energy-efficient light emitting diode (LED) lightingfixtures. With research, development and production facilities located in Ellwood City,Pennsylvania, ALSI has developed several products using cutting-edge, patentedtechnology. ALSI products include next generation streetlights, warehouse lighting, signillumination, parking lot, parking garage lighting, tunnel lighting, indoor office lighting,and other specialty lighting applications. For additional information, visitwww.appalachianlightingsystems.com.Orlando International (MCO)MCO has several links on their environment web page for various projects. A listing ofthe links is provided below:From: http://www.orlandoairports.net/environment/index.htmEnergy Conservation and Environmental Initiatives ForumPresentations AECOM - Leading the Way to Sustainability (pdf) Ameresco - Performance Contracting (pdf) Blue Chip Energy - Solar Power (pdf) Complete Green Systems - Quality Energy Solutions for a Greener Tomorrow (pdf) Eaton - Energy Audit (pdf) EcoLight LED Systems - LED Lighting (pdf) FCC_Environmental - Recycling Services & Industrial Cleaning (pdf) FDEP - Pollution Prevention (P2) in Your Business (pdf) 10
  • 11. GE - Green Building Solutions (pdf) Lighting Technologies - Energy Saving Lighting (pdf) MPS Efficiency Solutions - Global Tech LED Lighting (pdf) NovaSol Energy - Powering on the Sunshine State (pdf) Optimum Energy - Optimum HVAC (pdf) Palmer Electric - Electric Vehicle Supply Infrastructure (pdf) Rexel USA/Sesco Lighting - Energy Efficient Lighting (ppt) Roth Brothers - Comprehensive Energy Strategies (pdf) SunWorks Solar - Solar Power (dvd) TectaAmerica - Transforming Your Buildings Footprint (pdf)Tampa International (TPA)From: http://www.tampaairport.com/about/facts/financials/hcaa_ann_rpt_2009.pdfWater Conservation• Low flow restroom fixtures• Recycled car wash water• Airside C condensation recovery/cooling tower• Reclaimed water from City of Tampa for landscape irrigation starting January 2010Clean Air Partnership• Green fleet - 17 electric vehicles for Airport Police and Maintenance to reduceemissions• Airline-owned electric ground support equipment• Cell Phone Waiting Lot – to reduce emissions and curbside congestionRecycling• Plastics, glass, aluminum cans, newspapers, paperboard, food boxes, etc.• Cardboard trash compactor saves $71 a ton on materialsLighting Solutions• Rental Car Garage• Energy efficient LED airfield lightingEnergy Management• Control systems in all Airport Facilities to regulate temperatures• All loading bridges have 400Hz power with pre-conditioned air• Shuttle cars/escalators/baggage system managementGood Neighbor - Reducing Noise Pollution• Program to track airplane noise complaints and active community noise group• An established noise abatement runway use program• On-site ground run-up enclosure – “hush house for aircraft” 11
  • 12. Austin International (AUS)From: http://www.ci.austin.tx.us/austinairport/downloads/environinits.pdfEnergy Efficiency & Peak Demand ReductionThe terminal building and its central heating and cooling systems are among the mostreliable and energy efficient type available. With the addition of thermal storage, theplant will provide a peak electrical reduction in excess of 1400 kW. This equates to a48% reduction in peak demand. The Citys goal for energy efficiency in the terminal is toexceed the Lighting and Thermal Envelope standards of the energy code by more than5% and 10% respectively. The integration of all building systems will enable the city toachieve this goal. Additional energy efficiency and peak demand reduction techniquesinclude: • As sited, the orientation of the terminal building reduced the amount of wall and window glazing required on the eastern and western portions of the terminal. In addition, shading devices functioning as window glazing have been installed on the southern portion of the terminal. • Thermally efficient glass that restricts heat flow but allows natural light to pass has been installed throughout the terminal. Ceramic frit also has been applied to certain glass lights located in carefully designed areas to specifically reduce glare and heat gain while retaining visual acuity. • Efficient building insulation had been utilized throughout the terminal.Efficient & Environmentally Sensitive Use of Raw & BuildingMaterialsBuilding materials were selected for durability, longevity and ease of maintenance. Thefinished surfaces exposed to public activity were designed to withstand the rigors ofpeople and baggage with little need for replacement or "touch-up." By utilizing thefollowing materials the City was able to minimize the depletion of natural resources.Building Structure: • Primary structural framing system of the terminal which includes, beams, columns, shapes and plates were constructed from 100% recycled materials. • Concrete reinforcing steel used in the terminal construction contained 95% recycled materials while the steel studs used in the terminal wall infrastructure contained 65% - 75% recycled materials. • Concrete used in terminal construction contained 10%-15% flyash while the runway, taxiways, and apron concrete mixes contained 20% flyash. Approximately, 16,000 tons of flyash has been utilized to date.Finish Material: • Granite flooring and walls, and terrazzo flooring were used throughout the terminal, as they are durable and capable of withstanding the rigors of public traffic. The materials also are non-absorptive which improves the Indoor Air Quality (IAQ). • Finishing paints utilized in the terminal emit low levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), also enhancing IAQ. 12
  • 13. • Recycled products such as gypsum paperboard facing which contains 100% recycled materials were used throughout the terminal. • Toilet partitions installed in the restrooms contain a High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) recycled plastic content. • Carpeting installed throughout the terminal has a manufacturer guarantee that stipulates that all returned carpet will be recycled into other products. • Wood products used in the overall construction of the airport were supplied from controlled growth forests. • Roofing insulation installed throughout the terminal was manufactured without the use of "CFCs." In addition, the roofing is comprised of light colored cap sheets that reflect heat.Site Construction: • Contractor Environmental Protection Programs were developed and implemented in order to minimize environmental impacts resulting from construction activities. • Clean builder practices such as the installation of silt fencing, use of run off controls, creation of sedimentation ponds, and the fencing and relocation of trees were required. • Proper site planning and design balanced the amount of cuts (excavations) and fills (embankments) to maximize the reuse of materials existing on site and to minimize the quantities of materials being imported or removed for disposal.Air Quality InitiativesThe City is continuously searching for new and innovative ways to improve the regionalair quality. As such, the City has developed and implemented the following landside andairside initiatives, in order to reduce emissions from airport sources.Landside InitiativesABIA can be expected to have excellent IAQ that will be a model for other airports.This will be achieved through: • Restricting the infiltration of contaminated outdoor air through the use of vestibules and air doors. • Purifying ventilated air through the use of high efficiency air filters that absorb odors, VOCs and emissions. • Utilizing interior finish materials and air delivery ducts that are resistant to microbiological growth. All air conditioning equipment and duct insulation is treated to resist microbiological growth. • Exhausting of air contaminated prone areas directly out doors. • Providing automatic ventilation control on the apron through the use of a carbon monoxide sensor system. • Utilizing low emission fuels heating and cooling equipment in the terminal and central plant.Airside InitiativesThe City has designed the airport to minimize air emissions to reduce the effect onregional air quality. Some of the more creative design features include: 13
  • 14. • An efficient airfield layout that minimizes aircraft taxi distances, resulting in lower fuel use and reduced air emissions. As alternative fuels are not available for commercial aircraft, reducing engine burn time is primary mitigation strategy to reduce emission. • While parked at the gate, aircraft at ABIA will use building-supplied electric power and air conditioning. This will eliminate the need to run on-board auxiliary power units thus helping to reduce emissions near the passenger terminal. • The latest Instrument Landing System technology will allow aircraft operations in the poorest of weather conditions. Aircraft will spend less time idling while waiting for clearer weather, resulting in lower emissions. In addition, aircraft holding time while waiting to land will be reduced also helping to lower emissions. • Alternative fuels such as compressed natural gas and electricity will be available for use by Ground Service Equipment (GSE) which service airplanes. The use of these fuels will result in lower emission and higher air quality environment in the vicinity of the passenger terminal aircraft parking apron. • Airport planning worked closely with Capital Metro to ensure accessibility by current available mass transit (buses) and future proposed mass transit (light rail) systems. • Aviation Department is planning to utilize alternate fuel vehicles with low emissions for its airport operations and is encouraging the airline tenants to do the same. • Providing cooling and power supplies from ramp service equipment to parked aircraft will greatly reduce aircraft emissions.Water ConservationThe Citys Water Conservation efforts were focused in three areas; PlumbingFixtures, Landscaping and Landscape Irrigation as these consume most of the waterat the airport. In addition to providing low consumption plumbing fixtures, all fixturesin public toilets will utilize automatic flow control valves to eliminate wasting of waterby excessive use or by being left open. Landscape plant materials will be limited to nativeplants with some use of xeriscaping. Prairie grass installations and the selection of lowgrowing native grasses will be used as a means to reduce mowing requirements and otherfield maintenance. Landscaping will be irrigated by a system that delivers water where itis needed in an efficient manner. Reclaiming wastewater will continue to be used forirrigation of the ABIA Golf Course and the Citys landscape designer will incorporate theability to add reclaimed water (storm water or treated effluent) to the irrigation systemsupply as adequate quantities become available. Additionally, discussions with the CitysWater and Wastewater Department have been initiated to investigate the integration ofthe Airports distribution system with the Departments treated effluent distributionsystem.Water Quality ImprovementsThe City has seized every opportunity to improve the quality of water leaving the airportproperty. Nearly 2 million square feet of water quality improvements, including 14
  • 15. sedimentation/filtration basins, temporary holding ponds and other runoff controls havebeen constructed at ABIA. Water quality ponds have been placed at strategic pointsacross the site to filter storm water runoff from aircraft ramps and vehicular parkingareas. Some of the more innovative water pollution initiatives include:Sophisticated recovery equipment and separators were incorporated into the Aircraft FuelStorage Facility to recover fuel leakage associated with normal fueling operations.All aircraft fueling and de-icing areas have fuel spill collection and containment systems.Contaminated runoff will be captured and disposed of, primarily via sanitary sewer andtreatment plants, rather than being discharged.Environmental RemediationThe ABIA property was formerly occupied by the U.S. Air Force, which was responsiblefor the creation and remediation of 481 hazardous waste sites…Reuse And RecyclingThe City is recycling much of the existing military base infrastructure. Whereverpossible, facilities and elements of facilities are being reused. One important benefit ofthe reuse/recycling effort is that less waste material is taken to area landfills, preservingcapacity for other needs. By pursuing the following initiatives the City is able to utilizescarce resources more effectively, while contributing to the local communities: • The City provided an on-site salvage yard to assist contractors with salvage and reuse of building components. Contractors displayed and sold doors, cabinets, windows, electrical and plumbing fixtures, air conditioning and heating equipment and other salvageable items. • Building demolition waste was segregated by type of materials to allow recycling of steel and copper building components. • An existing aircraft hanger scheduled for demolition was disassembled and reused by the contractor. • Existing topsoil was stockpiled for reuse. Topsoil, which is created by years of environmental conditions, was removed from project areas where excavation was required. This soil was stockpiled for latter reuse after project completion, reducing airport construction costs and contributing to a better planting environment. • On-site fencing had been reused for both permanent and temporary access controls. • Existing Air Force runway, taxiway, and apron pavements were rehabilitated and reused. • Electrical primary wiring was salvaged and sold for scrap. • Terminal Contractor is recycling steel scrap from construction. • More than 40 trees were relocated on the site, making way for new airport facility construction. • Excess soil from excavations had been reused for embankments rather than hauled to landfill. • The existing Air Force golf course was modified to accommodate the new airfield configuration and was added to the Citys inventory of public golf courses. 15
  • 16. • Implementation of an Airport Waste Recycling Program, reuse of paint solvents, recycling waste oil from vehicle engines and oil filters, and reclamation of jet fuel from the airport fueling facility. • Installation of dual trash chutes in the terminal. At each trash chute location there are two chutes - one for recyclable waste and one for all other waste. The trash compactor area also is set-up with dual compactors for the separation of waste materials to foster recycling of terminal generated wastes.Some of the more noteworthy programs implemented by the City included:Military Housing RelocationOver 700 single family and duplex military houses are being relocated from the propertyand made available to low-income families. These houses are sold to families using low-interestloans. The brick is removed from the houses and they are unbolted from the concrete slabs.Duplex houses are cut in half, yielding two smaller housed. Long steel beams are inserted throughthe houses and attached to a truck for the move. Following placement on a new slab, siding isinstalled as the exterior finish. The City is saving approximately $1 million in demolition costs byrelocating the military housing.Existing Fuel Tanks RelocatedTwo large aircraft fuel tanks were relocated on the site to allow refurbishment and reuse. Thetanks, which together can hold over one million gallons of fuel, needed to be moved away fromthe soil contamination area. A contractor installed larger air compressors on the tank sidesconnected to a large rubber ring around the base. The tanks were cut free form their bases and"floated" to a new home, saving $200,000.Concrete RecyclingA major on-site concrete plant has saved the City more than $2 million in crushed aircraftpavement. The City received assistance from the FFA, which approved the use of the crushedconcrete as a drainage layer under new airfield pavements. The FAA believes that this is thelargest installation of drainable base course ever undertaken at an airport. More than 250,000 tonsof existing Bergstrom aircraft parking pavement have been removed to allow construction of thepassenger terminal and the midfield cross taxiways. The concrete was broken up and transportedto a crush plant. Two types of crushed material, fine and coarse, were produced and separated bythe crusher. The crushed concrete is used underneath new pavements and utilities, providing astable base for airport facilities construction.Chapel Elements SalvagedThe existing military chapel was relocated in a corridor needed for airport access roads. Duringdemolition the City worked with its contractor to locate a small church which needed thebeautiful wood beams and the bell. The contractor carefully worked around the beams preventingdamage while exposing them for removal. The materials were then trucked to their new churchhome.Reduced Noise ImpactWhen ABIA opens, noise impacts due to aircraft activity will be significantly reduced. Thenumber of residents who live in an airport noise area will be reduced from over 30,000 (aroundRobert Mueller Municipal Airport) to approximately 1,500. The City will save over $50 million 16
  • 17. in sound insulation costs for the residences around Robert Mueller Municipal Airport. Fourschools adjacent to ABIA, which were previously impacted by military aircraft noise, will berelocated. In 1996, the City reached an agreement with the Del Valle Independent School Districtfor the purchase of the schools. The FAA is providing a significant portion of the funding for theschool purchase. To prevent encroachment of incompatible land uses around the new airport, theCity in 1994 enacted compatibility zoning. As shown at left (What is this referring to?), newnoise sensitive land uses cannot be established within the airport noise impact area. The zoningis based on a conservatively large area, which will shrink with the increasing use of latest-technology quieter aircraft engines. Airlines are required by Federal law to convert all of theiraircraft to this technology by the year 2000.Community InvolvementThe City used every avenue available to involve the local community in the development ofABIA. • During the Airport Master Plan, Environmental Impact Statement and FAR Part 150 Noise Study, open house workshops and public hearings were used to discuss the project with citizens and learn about public questions and concerns. • A newsletter has been published since 1992, which informs the public of the progress and overall status of the airport development program. Distribution is via direct mail (approximately 2,000) and through public presentations. • The City has produced three generations of a virtual reality video to help the public visualize the new airport. The latest version of the video, which takes the viewer up the access road and into the passenger terminal, was awarded first place in the 1997 ACI-NA Marketing and communications Contest. • The City conducts over 40 public presentations annually to interested citizen groups. These presentations typically include photographic slides on the latest airport construction and handout materials. • The New Airport Project Team (NAPT) developed an Educational Outreach Program for local Del Valle High School students. Called "Passport to Aviation," the program uses airport construction to teach environmental principles, math and science. The students visit the new airport monthly for brief lessons followed by field visits to see the principles put into action. The education program was honored in 1996 with an "Above & Beyond" Red Apple award from the school district.Archaeological And Historic PreservationIn follow-on investigations resulting from the Environmental Impact Statement, the City tookaction to preserve cultural history through analysis, field testing and protective measures. Thiswork had been completed and approved by the Texas Historical Commission. • Two on-site cemeteries were designated as State Archeological Landmarks, but were not eligible for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places. Both cemeteries are located away from future airport development areas. A permanent buffer zone has been established on the Airport Layout Plan and a long-term management plan has been prepared for these cemeteries. • A total of 44 archeological sites and three architectural properties were evaluated. Five of the archeological sites were found to be potentially significant and field testing was accomplished for each. The testing indicated that only one site was eligible for State and National historic designation. • During the course of the analysis, extensive coordination with local citizens was accomplished. The City provided field visits and early reviews of draft reports to 17
  • 18. interested citizens. Students in the "Passport to Aviation" program participated in actual data recovery during archeological site field testing.Chicago Department of Aviation (ORD, MDW,GRY)From: http://www.flychicago.com/environment/pdf/SustainableInitiatives2-2-2010.pdfUpdates on CDA Sustainable Initiatives O’Hare ModernizationProgram (OMP) • We are incorporating environmentally-friendly initiatives into our efforts to modernize O’Hare International Airport. In 2003, we created a “Sustainable Design Manual,” a nationally-recognized document that allows O’Hare to evolve as the benchmark for environmental stewardship in design and construction for a civil project. • Since there were no generally accepted standards for implementing sustainable initiatives on civil construction projects, the OMP designed its own standards based on the United States Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design. • The OMP developed a “Green Airplane” rating system to track compliance with the Sustainable Design Manual. Each eligible project is awarded from 1 – 5 “Green Airplanes” based on their ability to incorporate sustainable initiatives. • In 2009, the Chicago Department of Aviation (CDA) updated the SDM and released it as the CDA Sustainable Airport Manual (SAM). The SAM is an expansion and enhancement of the OMP SDM. SAM incorporates best practices, new technologies and lessons learned from six years of design and construction on the OMP as well as a compilation of recommendations and expertise of airport executives, environmentalist, and industry leaders. This manual is intended to be a living document and will continue to evolve as future technologies and innovations are identified.Some of the other OMP sustainable initiatives include: • Implementation of a balanced earthwork plan to manage excess materials and keep soil on-site, saving more than $120 million in program costs. In addition to the cost savings, the balanced earthwork and material reuse program has resulted in the preservation of natural resources, reduction in vehicle miles traveled and emissions, and over 70,000 tons less CO2 produced. • Replacing 154 acres of low quality, inaccessible wetlands currently on Airport property with nearly 450 acres of higher quality wetlands, providing a more natural environment for birds and wildlife, and creating new passive recreation space in neighboring communities. • Building vegetated roofs on our Airfield Lighting Control Vault, the canopy of the relocated Guard Post 1 and the base building of our new North Air Traffic Control Tower. 18
  • 19. In addition, we are: • Requiring the use of Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel Fuel (ULSD) for on- and offroad construction vehicles greater than 50 hp. This requirement is included in every OMP construction contract, and was put in place five years ahead of the federal government’s mandate; • Equipping all but the newest construction vehicles with oxidation catalysts for cleaner emissions; • Recovered 95 percent of all construction-demolition materials (concrete, asphalt, dirt), and reused them on-site, thereby diverting them from landfills. • Mandating that trucks conveying materials leave the site covered; • Utilizing materials from within 500 miles of job site; and • Restricting idling of construction vehicles.As a result, our sustainable initiatives have won several awards including the UnitedStates Green Building Council’s Small Feet, Large Feat award and, most recently,Engineering News Record’s Top 25 Newsmakers and the Unites Nation’s EnvironmentalProgramme (sic) for Liveable (sic) Communities.Denver International (DEN)From: http://business.flydenver.com/community/enviro/index.aspSignificant Environmental Aspects at DIA • Aircraft Deicing Fluid • Liquid Fuels • Remediation/Investigation Derived Waste • Exploration and Production Products • Universal Waste • Municipal Solid Waste • Sediments and Street-sweeping Waste • Criteria air pollutants o Particulates (PM 10, PM 2.5, Dust Opacity) o Carbon Monoxide o Nitrogen Oxide o Volatile Organic Compound • Hazardous Waste • Wetlands • Migratory Birds • Sewage • Natural Habitat • Ozone Depleting Compounds • Pavement Deicers • Lubricants • Solvents • Wash Fluids 19
  • 20. • Threatened and Endangered Species • NoiseWhat we recycle at DEN: • Aluminum cans • Wood pallets • Office paper • Scrap metal • Newspaper • Used oil • Magazines • Tires • Old corrugated containers (cardboard boxes) • Antifreeze • Restaurant grease • Concrete spoils from construction • Old telephone directories (phone books) • Asphalt spoils from construction • Toner cartridges from printers • Aircraft deicing fluid (ADF) • Computers • Solvents • Batteries • Glass • Fluorescent and high-intensity discharge (HID) lamps • Demolition materials • OrganicsFrom: http://business.flydenver.com/community/enviro/documents/2009summary.pdfSee same document in WINGS, “Chris Homko Projects”, “Other Airport GreenInitiatives”, “DEN Green Sustainability 2009 Summary.pdf”.Page 2: DIA was Built with the Environment in Mind • Dedicated deicing pads • Deicing fluid collection, conveyance, and storage • Onsite glycol recycling facility • Municipal solid waste recycling • Onsite CNG stations • Underground fuel hydrant system with sophisticated monitoring • Electricity and preconditioned air supplied to 100% of the gates • Alternatively fueled vehicles • Terminal and concourses designed to enhance natural daylight 20
  • 21. Page 3: DIA’s Environmental Recognition • EMS certified to ISO 14001 in 2004, the first U.S. airport to implement a facility- wide ISO 14001-certified EMS • Accepted into CDPHE Environmental Leadership Program in 2004 • Received 2 City and County of Denver 5281 awards • Received the Colorado Environmental Partnership/CDPHE Sustainability Champion Award • Participating in the Global Reporting Initiative Airport Sector Supplement DevelopmentPage 4: EMS, Greenprint Denver, and Climate Action Plan Goals • Reduce energy use by 1% per passenger • Reduce gasoline use by 5% • Reduce hazardous waste generation by 5% • Reduce solid waste by 5% per passenger • Reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 10% per capita by 2012 relative to 1990 • Maintain aircraft deicing fluid collection efficiency of 69% • Increase alternatively fueled light-duty vehicles to 70% • LEED Silver standard for all new city constructionPage 6: Photovoltaics at DIAThree photovoltaic projects underway/completed at DIA to day (sic):Pena Boulevard array: 2 Megawatt facility (DC) 7.5 acres9,254 solar panels at 216 watts/panelGenerated 3.256 million kWHyear 1Fuel Farm array:1.6 Megawatt facility (DC)9 acres7,392 panels at 216 watts/panelDIAfuel farm and distributionExpected to generate 2.4M kWh year 12010 project:4.3 MW facility30 acresPage 7: Energy and Emission Reduction Projects • Anti-idling campaigns o No idling message on fuel pump system o “Engines OFF!” air fresheners o No Idle Zone signage • Replacement of gasoline vehicles • Engine retrofits • Carpool and public transportation incentives • Lighting retrofits • Hybrid taxi fee reduction program 21
  • 22. Page 9: System Improvements (Materials Mangement) • Added recycling to the food courts • Implemented an organics collection and composting pilot • 20% reduction in paper usage • New environmental training for purchasing card holders • Increase in solid waste diversions to 11.9% (4.2% in 2004) • Added DVD/CD recycling to the list of recyclables at DIAPage 10: 2009 Report CardGasoline usage: 539 Actual: 644 (gallons gasoline per gasoline vehicle)Electricity usage target: 5.06 Actual: 4.58 (kWh used per passenger)ADF capture: 69% Actual: 70% (ratio of applied to collected)Hazardous waste: 25.7 Actual: 6.1 (pounds per million passengers)Solid waste to landfill: .42 Actual: 0.43 (pounds per passenger)Paper reduction: 10% Actual: 12%Page 11: Sustainability makes Cents • $6,200 saved by using 13% less paper at DIA • $12,000 savings from reducing HW generation • $22,000 in gasoline costs saved by DIA carpoolers • $24,000 saved from new fry oil contract • $95,000 in savings due to solid waste recycling • $150,000 in annual insurance premium savings • $500,000 less spent due in part to reduced usage of gas and CNG • $6.8 million savings by using less pavement deicer • $1.4 million avoided cost for on-site aircraft deicing fluid recyclingPhoenix Sky Harbor (PHX)From: http://skyharbor.com/community/green-initiatives.htmlAdditional information for all listed Green Initiatives can be accessed from this page byclicking on each individual link. Information on Recycling and Waste Reduction andEnergy Conservation were printed here in this report below.Green InitiativesReducing energy use through greener construction and energy efficient buildings, use ofalternative fuels, and reduction of waste are high priorities for the Phoenix AirportSystem. 22
  • 23. Ways that Sky Harbor is working to be environmentally friendly: • Skylights In Buildings Conserve Energy • Alternative Fuels • Airport User Vehicle Emissions Reduction Initiatives • Environmentally Responsible Purchasing • Recycling & Reduction of Waste • Air Quality & Climate Change • Energy Conservation • Green Building • Sky Train is Environmentally Friendly • Community Noise Reduction Program and other Social Sustainability programs • Water ConservationFrom: http://skyharbor.com/community/waste-reduction.htmlRecycling and Waste ReductionPhoenix Sky Harbor International Airport is always looking for ways to reduce waste andgo green!Passengers can now use Sky Harbors recycling receptacles past security in all of theAirports concourses. The silver cans with green logos are easy to find and ready to use."We have always looked for innovative ways to reduce waste at Phoenix Sky HarborInternational Airport. The placement of these receptacles in our concourses is a logicaladdition to our growing recycling program," says Becky Gawin, Deputy AviationDirector of Facilities and Services. Sky Harbors employees, shops, restaurants and otherbusiness partners have been recycling for years and now passengers can ‘go green’ in SkyHarbors concourses as well.What Sky Harbor is doing to be environmentally friendly: • Reclaimed asphalt millings (from road and airfield projects) are used to stabilize soil and control dust • Oil, antifreeze and batteries are recycled • Cardboard recycling program has been in effect for approximately 20 years • Employee recycling program is in place • Green trimmings are mulched and reused as mulch • Where feasible excavated soils, asphalt and concrete removed during construction projects are stored on-site for reuseFrom: http://skyharbor.com/community/energy-conservation.html 23
  • 24. Energy ConservationIncreased focus on energy conservation resulted in a 7 percent decrease in energy use atSky Harbor in one year, an 11.2 million pound reduction in greenhouse gases, a savingsof more than 7 million kilowatt hours and more than $200,000.The Airport recently received more than $250,000 in rebates from the local utility forupgrades to a terminal chiller system and a building design that increased use of naturallight while reducing solar intrusion.Some of the many energy conservation programs implemented include: • Installed controls to turn off electric lights during the daylight hours. • Installed air conditioning controls in the Operations and Facilities & Services buildings. • Instituted thermostat and temperature sensor settings per ASHRAE guidelines. • Shut down redundant vertical transportation equipment during the night time hours. • Several older, less energy efficient cooling units were replaced, resulting in reductions of energy used and the greenhouse gases emitted from local utility power plants. • The Aviation Department was chosen for an annual City Environmental Performance Indicator an energy reduction goal. • Installation of skylights, built with a ‘solar tracker’ device that maximizes the sunlight brought into the building. A pilot installation of these devices is located in the north concourse of Terminal 3. • As a result of the above were able to add 38 more lighting fixtures to the Reduced Lighting Schedule saving 14,000 kilowatt hours of electricity annually. • Installed a new Direct Digital Control system in Terminals 3 and 4. • EDS Section testing results achieved a 30 percent reduction in energy consumption. • Continued installation of occupancy sensors in offices and conference rooms. • Changed out approximately 2,000 HID metal halide light fixtures to florescent, reducing wattage per fixture by 79 watts. • Reduced the number of light fixtures on the Terminal 4 Boulevard by one-third and lowered remaining fixtures from 1,000 watts to 400 watts by lowering fixture height. • Added analog photocells in Terminals 3 and 4, in the East Economy parking Garages and the Rental Car Center. • Added lighting controls to the Terminal 2 ramp lights and gate areas and to the Terminal 4 parking garage. • Fine-tuned lighting reduction schedule Airport wide. • Coordinated efforts with APS and controls vendor to gather data to quantify energy conservation efforts. • Installed five electric meters in the terminals to monitor real time energy usage. 24
  • 25. • Installed “Data Loggers” to validate energy savings as a result of reduced lighting measures.Salt Lake City International (SLC)From: http://www.slcairport.com/environment.aspThe Salt Lake City Department of Airports has integrated environmental policies andpractices, business operations and asset management functions to ensure thatsustainability is managed holistically.Recycling • Over 7800 pounds of paper, aluminum and other recyclables are collected monthly from offices and recycled. • Last year, over 60 tons of newspaper and plastic were recycled from airport terminals. • In 2008, the airport recycled approximately 247 tons of cardboard. • Aircraft deicing fluid is collected, processed and resold. Last year, the airport sold over 92,000 gallons of glycol. • Demolished asphalt and concrete are salvaged and stockpiled for re-use as road base or stabilization material in construction projects. • In 2008, the airport reused or recycled approximately 63,000 cubic yards of construction debris. • Vegetation disrupted by construction is converted to mulch and reused. • 37 tons of Metal from demolition was sent to scrap metal facilities for recycling. • 5,300 gallons of Used oil from the vehicle fleet and general aviation was recycled. • 172 Used tires and 248 batteries were returned to suppliers for recycling.Water conservation • Since 2001, the airport has planted water conserving landscape that features plants that thrive in Utah’s high desert environment. • A drip irrigation watering system has been installed for more efficient water use. • Restrooms are now equipped with water conserving plumbing fixtures which reduces water consumption by half.Alternative Fuels • The airport’s shuttle buses run on clean burning natural gas. • Light and medium duty vehicles have also been converted to natural gas. • Electric vehicles and hybrids have been incorporated into the airport fleet. • Tenants are offered incentives to use alternative fuel and there is a natural gas fueling station on the airport. 25
  • 26. Use of Technology • A Building Automation System (BAS) calculates the most efficient use of boilers, chillers, cooling towers and distribution loops. This conserves energy and reduces operating costs. • The BAS also controls most of the lighting throughout the airport. Lighting is maximized through the use of daylight ambient sensors and time of day use. • BAS controls outside radiant heaters saving electricity.Management Practices • Water based paint is now required replacing high emission producing oil based paints. • The airport encourages tenant participation in recycling programs. Delta Air Lines recycles inflight waste. • Maintains 450 acres of wetlands west of the airport. • Currently, thousands of light fixtures are being replaced with more energy efficient, long lasting fixtures.Wildlife MitigationThe Salt Lake City Department of Airports has taken a proactive approach to managingthe impact that wildlife can have on airport operations.An extensive hazing program and habitat modification are the primary elements of theprogram. Airport Operations Officers patrol the runways, taxiways and associated area 20hours daily. They are armed with shotguns with cracker shells that are used to scare awaybirds. The airfield is also equipped with bird cannons. These automated cannons firerandomly or can be remotely activated.Airport personnel work closely with a full time staff biologist in identifying species, theirpreferred nesting areas and food sources. Then they eliminate the food, nesting areas anddeploy other practices aimed at keeping the bird population low. Bird count surveys aretaken twice daily at 13 sites to monitor activity. Salt Lake City International Airportencompasses over 7,000 acres.Natural predators are low in urban areas and around airports. So, some natural predatorsare allowed to thrive in the environment.In certain situations, birds and animals are trapped and relocated away from the airports.The Department also has a permit to use lethal control as necessary.The process is constantly evolving. Bird populations rise and fall with weather changes,food supply and other natural conditions.The Department keeps careful records of the types and numbers of birds and animals thatare found on the airfield or are reported to have had collisions with aircraft. 26
  • 27. In 2008, Salt Lake City International Airport conducted 400,000 take-offs and landings.Department records indicate there were 69 bird strikes that year with 2% of themresulting in significant aircraft damage.The Department works closely with State of Utah and United States Department ofAgriculture experts as well as other airports and aviation industry organizations to keepcurrent on methods and share information.San Diego International (SAN)From: http://www.san.org/sdcraa/airport_initiatives/default.aspxAirport Master PlanIn an effort to maximize the use of San Diego International Airport, the Airport Authoritydeveloped the Airport Master Plan. In 2005, the Authority Board selected the build-out ofTerminal 2 West as the preferred alternative. With the environmental review processalready under way, construction of 10 additional gates, airfield improvements, structuredparking and more efficient airport roadways is expected to begin in 2009.An airport master plan represents the approved actions to be accomplished for phaseddevelopment of the airport. Master plans address the airfield, terminal, landside accessimprovements, modernization, and expansion of existing airports and establish thepremise for planning for a new airport. More can be found on the listed webpage.The Green Build: Moving Forward, Soaring HigherThe Green Build is a series of construction projects taking place through the year 2012 atthe west end of San Diego International Airport. The projects will help the airport meetcurrent and future demand by enhancing passenger and aircraft flow, terminal amenities,roadways and the airfield. Projects include: • a 10-gate build-out of Terminal 2 West • an elevated dual-level roadway with convenient curbside check-in kiosks • expanded shopping and dining areas • airfield improvements to enhance the efficiency of aircraft movements • The “Green” in The Green Build stands for environmentally friendly aspects being integrated throughout the projects, as well as for the significant economic benefits – including over 1,000 construction jobs during peak construction – these projects will bring to the region. More can be found on the listed webpage.Land Use CompatibilityThe San Diego County Regional Airport Authority is committed to protecting the safetyand welfare of the general public and the ability of airports to operate now and in thefuture. One of the Authority’s responsibilities is to serve as the Airport Land UseCommission (ALUC) for San Diego County. The ALUC is charged with creating orupdating Airport Land Use Compatibility Plans (ALUCPs) for the regions 16 public-use 27
  • 28. and military airports in accordance with applicable state and federal law. More can befound on the listed webpage.Regional Aviation Strategic PlanSenate Bill 10, authored by Senator Christine Kehoe and passed in 2007, mandates thatthe San Diego County Regional Airport Authority (Airport Authority), in collaborationwith the San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG), prepare a RegionalAviation Strategic Plan (RASP) to identify workable strategies to improve theperformance of the regional airport system in San Diego County. (RASP) to identifyworkable strategies to improve the performance of the regional airport system in SanDiego County.Each airport’s capabilities and resources will be carefully considered to ensure maximumefficiency and utilization.The Airport Authority launched a two-year process to develop long-rangerecommendations for all of the county’s civilian airports with the goal of improving theperformance of the regional airport system. More can be found on the listed webpage.NoiseThe mission of Airport Noise Mitigation is to reduce the aircraft noise impact on thecommunity through mitigation programs while monitoring compliance with local, state,and federal regulations, thus maintaining an environmentally viable airport. Programsinclude the Quieter Home Program, Curfew Violation Review Panel, Noise AdvisoryCommittee, Flight Tracker, Airport Use Regulations (noise curfew) and more. More canbe found on the listed webpage.EnvironmentalIt is the goal of the Airport Authority to plan, design and operate San Diego InternationalAirport in a manner that shows the utmost respect for our unique natural setting – anurban center on the shore of San Diego Bay. The Airport Authority strives to protect thewide variety of natural resources that exist at this location. Every aspect of the existingand future activities at the Airport are designed to protect these natural resources, as wellas the health and well-being of the traveling public that pass through our facility, andsurrounding neighborhoods and communities, and the people that work at the Airport.Key responsibilities include planning for and promoting sustainable airport development;ensuring compliance with all environmental laws and regulations; responsibly managingenvironmental issues pertaining to the airports operations and its potential impacts tosurrounding areas; protecting and promoting the natural resources within the AirportAuthoritys jurisdiction; and disseminating public information. More can be found on thelisted webpage.Long Beach Airport CA (LGB)From: http://www.longbeach.gov/airport/green/green/air.asp 28
  • 29. Air QualityThe Long Beach Airport “charges” into the Future!Installation of electric-charging infrastructure on the Airports commercial ramp allowedLGB airlines to switch much of their fossil-fuel burning tugs and baggage loaders to zeroemission electric models.These special “fast-charging” ground service equipment (GSE) charging stationseffectively reduce the normal charge time of battery-powered equipment to about 20-25%of the normal charge time without damaging the equipment’s battery. This reductionallows GSE to perform their duties more efficiently and achieve the same duty cycle asinternal combustion equipment in the same capacity.In addition to reduced carbon emissions, the electric GSE reduce noise in the terminalramp area, promote alternative fuel use and conserve energy.US Airways and Jet Blue Airways were the first to commit to the “electrifying”partnership and are dedicating a significant number of equipment for use here at LGB!And for an extra “shock” value…Public-Use Electric Vehicle Chargers at LGB!By January 1st, LGB will offer two public-use electric vehicle charging stations. Thechargers, located in Parking Lot B, just off Donald Douglas Drive in front of the terminal,will be available to both airport users and local travelers in need of a charge-up for theirelectric vehicles.Bicycles Are Zero Emission Vehicles, Too!Click here for Bike Rack Information at LGB!Long Beach Airport Establishes A "Smoke Free Terminal" Policy.Click here for more detailed information and outdoor designated smoking areas.From: http://www.longbeach.gov/airport/green/green/energy.aspEnergy ConservationCurrently no information is available.From: http://www.longbeach.gov/airport/green/green/solar.aspSolar EnergyLong Beach Airport Plants a "Solar Forest" 29
  • 30. In 2008, the Long Beach Airport began generating clean and renewable energy byinstalling six “solar trees.” Each tree is made up of a steel pole topped with a photovoltaic(PV) array approximately 9 feet by 9 feet in dimension. The arrays are bolted to a dual-axis tracker that will guide the array to maximize solar gain by shifting tilt andorientation every hour to track the sun throughout the day. The panels of the solar tree arebi-facial which means that they collect light from above and also reflected light frombelow, thereby maximizing solar ray exposure.In addition to generating clean energy, the Airport’s “solar forest” will effectively offsetnearly a half million pounds of carbon dioxide emissions, the equivalent of planting threeacres of trees, over its system life. Solar power generation educational displays arelocated beside the “solar trees” at the Airport’s south baggage claim area.From: http://www.longbeach.gov/airport/green/green/stormwater.aspStorm WaterIndustrial Storm Water Permit: What does it mean for LGB?The Long Beach Airport is responsible for the implementation of, and must be incompliance with, the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES)mandates of the Clean Water Act. One objective of the mandates is to prevent all non-storm water discharges from entering the storm drain system which leads directly to theocean.Debris and pollutants enter the storm drain primarily through streets, gutters and catchbasins. All pollutants — including trash, greenwaste, cleaning agents, oil, and hazardouswaste — are prohibited by law from entering the storm drain system.LGB is dedicated to complying with, and helping all tenants (as co-permittees) complywith, the NPDES mandates. To that end, we encourage any Airport tenant to contact uswith questions, concerns, or issues that need clarification.Contact Long Beach Airports Operations staff for more information at 562-570-2638.Los Angles World Airports (LAX, ONT, VNY)From: Johnson, Robert. “Sustainability & Environmental Initiatives at Los AngelesWorld Airports”. March 04, 2009. Downloaded June 28, 2010. PowerPoint Presentation.http://www.lawa.org/welcome_LAWA.aspx?id=1036This presentation may be found in WINGS “Chris Homko Projects”, “Other AirportGreen Initiatives”, “LAWA Environmental Programs 030409.ppt”. A summary of someslides is below: 30
  • 31. Slide 9: Current Environmental Initiatives • Air Quality • Energy Conservation and Green Power • Source Reduction and Recycling • Water Conservation and Management • Wildlife and Habitat Conservation • Construction Measures • Social ResponsibilitySlide 12: Energy Conservation and Green Power • Retrofitting existing buildings with energy efficient lighting fixtures during remodeling projects • Ongoing program to upgrade all building air-handling units • Agreement with DWP to purchase 25% Green PowerSlide 13: Source Reduction and Recycling Programs • During 2007, LAWA diverted more than 22,095 tons of recyclable materials from landfills • LAWA recycled and reused more than 65% of trash it generated in 2007 • Green materials (grass clippings and tree branches) are recycled into compost • LAWA provides recycling services to tenants at no charge and assists tenants with setting up their own recycling programsSlide 14: Water Conservation and Management Programs • Buildings and terminals at LAX feature low-flow devices on toilets and sinks • Water used in on-airport car wash facilities is recycled • 35% of all landscaped areas at LAX are irrigated by reclaimed water • 40.2 million gallons (123 acre-feet) of water is conserved each year through the use of reclaimed water • LAWA working with DWP to determine feasibility of bringing reclaimed water into the Central Terminal Area for use in the Central Utilities Plant cooling towerBurbank CA Bob Hope Airport (BUR)From: http://www.burbankairport.com/noise/sustainability.htmlSustainabilityWhen the Airport Authority began operating Bob Hope Airport in 1978, the principalenvironmental issue associated with the Airport was aircraft noise. In today’s world it hasbecome apparent that everyone must strive to achieve sustainability in the long term, andthe Airport actively seeks ways to reduce its carbon footprint, reduce air and waterpollution, and reduce energy usage. The following are a few examples of achievements inthis area. 31
  • 32. Clean Air ProgramIn 2005, the Airport implemented a Clean Air Program, under which it installed batterychargers for electric ground service equipment at all 14 aircraft parking positions at theterminal. That installation allowed the airlines to replace much of their diesel andgasoline-powered equipment with electrified equipment, resulting in reduced airpollution.Diesel BusesThe parking lot shuttle fleet has been reconfigured with low-sulphur diesel engines andspecial exhaust traps, reducing particulate matter 96 percent compared to the previousfleet of older generation diesel buses. Looking ahead, the Authority will test aCompressed Natural Gas (CNG) engine in one of its shuttle buses.LEED Compliant HangarThe Airport is home to the first Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)Green Building Rating System platinum-certified aircraft hangar in the nation. The63,653-square-foot hangar has innovative and locally sensitive design elementsthroughout the project.Waste Disposal ImprovementsThe Authority’s waste disposal provider recycles up to two-thirds of the Airport’s wastestream, preventing it from ever reaching a landfill.Use of recycled water has been enhanced and catch basin filters have been installed tohelp collect pollutants before they enter the storm drain system.Faucet aerators and hands-free faucets in the terminal make water usage more efficient,and drip irrigation plus low water consuming landscaping conserve water on thepremises.Energy Efficient MeasuresLights in the parking structure and both terminals have been replaced with energyefficient bulbs. Taxiway lighting systems have been replaced with LED lighting andother “smart technology” enhancements have been made.The Airport has a test installation of hybrid “ice energy” air conditioners that produce iceat night when power rates are low and which then chills the air conditioner coolant duringthe day, reducing both C02 and Nox.Las Vegas McCarran International (LAS)From: http://www.mccarran.com/Recycle/2010_02_06_Recycle_brochure.pdf 32
  • 33. Taxiing to a Sustainable Future (Pages 5-6)Environmental sustainability means doing more than just recycling products, so the DOAhas taken steps to reduce air pollution and conserve energy by: • Implementing a fleet of common-use, clean burning biodiesel buses that run between the airport and McCarran Rent-A-Car Center • Providing central power and air conditioning units for aircraft parked on gates • Installing underground fuel hydrant systems for aircraft and vapor recovery systems at fueling facilities • Upgrading escalators and moving walkways with energy efficient equipment • Utilizing an Automated Vehicle Identification System that has decreased congestion on airport roadways and prevented commercial vehicles from needlessly circling the airport • Requiring commercial vehicle operators to shut down their engines upon parking, loading or unloading customers • Upgrading flight information display screens with energy saving LCD monitors • Minimizing the release of volatile organic compounds by purchasing more water- based paints and non-aerosol cleaning products • Requiring construction of new airport facilities to include desert landscaping and energy efficient HVAC and lighting systems • Using alternative fuels for regular gas-burning vehicles, and replacing older vehicles with hybrid equivalents • Maintaining airport roadways, runways and taxiways through scheduled street sweeping and applying dust suppressants to unpaved areasSan Jose International (SJC)From: http://www.sjc.org/community.php?page=air_quality&exp=2&subtitle=Environment+|+Air+QualityAir Quality MeasuresTo reduce motor vehicle trips and congestion, the Airport has implemented the followingprograms: • Free VTA transit passes are provided to 500 Airport employees and approx. 3,000 tenant employees working at the Airport to encourage the use of public transportation. • The Airport subsidizes free VTA shuttle bus service, called the Airport Flyer, between the Airport terminals, the Metro Light Rail station, and the Santa Clara Caltrain station. • Public transit information is promoted on the Airport’s website and at the terminals. • Free shuttle bus service is provided between Airport terminals and to and from both the rental car center and the long-term parking lot. • Taxis are required to park in designated queues and advance for customer pickup only when dispatched. This procedure also cuts down on engine idling. 33
  • 34. • Commercial vehicle operators are required to pay a fee for every vehicle trip in the terminal area. To the extent feasible, airport construction employee parking is designated for off-airport areas with shuttle bus operations used to reduce individual vehicle trips. • Airport employee parking is strategically consolidated and shuttle bus operations are used to reduce vehicle trips.Several roadway improvements have also contributed to reducing emissions, including: • The one-way Airport Boulevard/Terminal Drive loop road eliminated the two traffic signals on-Airport property and minimized the need for vehicle idling. • The new Route 87/Skyport Drive interchange provides a grade separation at Airport Boulevard eliminating the need for a traffic signal. • The new I-880/Coleman Avenue interchange includes a new direct on-ramp from Airport Boulevard to southbound I-880. • The new Terminal Area Improvement Program has a roadway improvement component that is focused on improving circulation, reducing delay and reducing unnecessary trips through the Airport campus.To promote the use of clean burning fuel, the Airport has implemented the followingmeasures: • The Airport has converted its entire 34-bus fleet of airport shuttles from diesel to compressed natural gas (CNG), which includes all the shuttle buses serving the Long-term parking lot, the airport’s terminals and the Rental Car Center. The conversion to CNG buses will result in over 100 tons of reduced emissions annually. • The on-Airport CNG fueling station, open to the public, was built in 2003 and provides the cheapest alternative fuel in the SF Bay area, often up to a $1.50 less a gallon then the price per gallon of regular gasoline. • SJC has a comprehensive Alternative Fuels Program (AFP) that provides incentives to encourage tenants to convert their vehicles to CNG or other alternative, cleaner burning vehicles. • One element of the AFP is the requirement that 25% of all trips to the Airport be made by taxis that are alternatively fueled, such as CNG or hybrids. Out of 300 taxis permitted to operate at the Airport, currently 119 are now CNG taxis and three are hybrid taxis. • Since 2000, the Airport has only purchased alternate-fuel vehicles. Approximately 25% of the Airport fleet of vehicles is now CNG. • Two free electric vehicle-charging stations have been available in the Terminal A Garage since 2001. See map for the location of the electrical vehicle charging station. • Mobile and ground electric power charging equipment stations have been installed at all Terminal A gates to promote airfield support vehicle operations. Ongoing terminal development includes battery recharge stations, 400-Hertz power, and preconditioned air thereby eliminating idling jet engines, and 34
  • 35. promoting conversion of aircraft ground support equipment (GSE) to zero emission vehicles. • The Airport has committed funding for an alternative fuel vehicle conversion program to facilitate the conversion of ground transportation vehicles to alternative fuel. Program implementation procedures are being developed now.Other measures the Airport has implemented include: • Runway/taxiway improvements have been made to reduce aircraft movement delays. • All airlines are encouraged to perform single or reduced engine taxiing to the extent determined safe and efficient. • Construction contractors are required to implement pollutant emissions abatement measures.The Airport continues its commitment to seek out and implement measures that minimizethe impact of Airport operations on the environment.San Francisco International (SFO)SFO has an abundance of environmental incentive publications. The SFO 2009 ClimateAction Plan (pdf) can be found on WINGS at “Chris Homko Projects”, “Other AirportGreen Initiatives”, “SFO 2009 Climate Action Plan.pdf” or athttp://www.flysfo.com/downloads/sfoclimateactionplan.pdf . This is a comprehensive120 page plan about carbon emissions at SFO and mitigation plans with costs andexpected break-even points.From:http://www.flysfo.com/web/export/sites/default/download/about/news/pressres/fact-sheet/pdf/Airport_For_a_New_Century_Fact_Sheet.pdfThis fact sheet can also be found on WINGS at “Chris Homko Projects”, “Other AirportGreen Initiatives”, “SFO Airport_For_a_New_Century_Fact_Sheet.pdf”. A summary ofthe Environmental Protection section on page 2:Sustainable ProductsThe interior of the IT contains 21,000 square feet of Forest Stewardship Council (FSC)certified cherry wood paneling on the office wall above the departure lobby, the worldslargest installation to date of veneer from a certified well-managed forest.Native PlantsLandscaping for the grounds around the IT is comprised of native plants and trees grownspecifically for SFO in Bay Area nurseries.Energy EfficiencyThe IT’s overall design is 30 percent more energy efficient than required under federallaw (Title 24 – Nonresidential Building Energy standards). Highlights include: 35
  • 36. • High-performance glazing: Insulated, laminated, ceramic-coated glass minimizes heat loss and maximizes daylight; • Revolving doors at west entrances provide air lock, reducing heat loss; • High-efficiency florescent lights; • Outside air economizer: An air conditioning system which uses 100 percent outside air, reducing demand on power generated by the central plant;Energy Management and Control SystemThis computerized system monitors all energy usage in the IT. It also adjusts all systemsto maintain optimum energy efficiency.Aircraft Energy/Air QualityThe IT employs technology and operating systems to increase energy efficiency andimprove air quality, including; • Pre-conditioned Air System: Provides cooling for aircraft docked at the boarding gates. Off-peak operation utilizes minimum energy to develop mass ice storage to augment peak demand. • 400Hz Ground Power System: Provides power to aircraft docked at the boarding gates. Centralized system converts building power to the 400Hz power used by the aircraft. • The combination of Pre-Conditioned Air and Ground Power System provides significant improvement in air quality by eliminating the emissions that would result from the use of the aircraft’s internal power generators that run on jet fuel.Traffic Reduction and Air QualitySFO’s Master Plan includes more than 35 measures designed to provide alternativesto low-occupancy vehicles, institute traffic management programs and provide additionalground transportation capacity to the airport. The AirTrain, which links passengers andemployees to the airport via mass transit connections, is the most visible example of themeasures. Among U.S. airports, SFO has one of the highest rates of commercial vehicleuse (40%) for the trip to and from the Airport.Noise ReductionSFO pursues aggressive noise mitigation programs including the expenditure of $154million to provide noise insulation for approximately 13,835 homes affected by aircraftnoise.Environmental MitigationThe Master Plan has an extensive environmental mitigation plan, including: the extensionof the San Francisco Bay Trail, water quality improvements at San Francisco’s MountainLake Park and restoration of more than 83 acres of wetlands at San Francisco’s CrissyField, India Basin-Hunters Point Recreation Area, Bayview Hunters Point Shipyard andBair Island in Redwood City. 36
  • 37. Oakland CA International (OAK)OAK has several web pages dedicated to reporting their environmental initiatives. Themain web page is here: http://www.flyoakland.com/noise/environmental.shtml . Below isa summary of a few links from that page.From: http://www.flyoakland.com/noise/environmental_airquality.shtmlAir Quality and Alternative FuelsEngine emissions from gasoline- or diesel-powered vehicles such as automobiles, trucksor aircraft service equipment, are some of the contributors of air pollution in the SanFrancisco Bay Area. OAK is actively working to reduce these emissions through itsalternative fuels program, focusing on vehicles using compressed natural gas (CNG)electric power, and solar-power program; aircraft ground power and pre-conditioned airprogram; an employee trip-reduction program; and a multi-modal public transportationprogram with the Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART).Compressed Natural GasOAK began incorporating alternative fuel vehicles into its fleet in 1999 because itrecognized that it would contribute locally to cleaner air in the surrounding communities,while displacing the global demand for foreign oil. OAK directed its energies towardsvehicles using compressed natural gas (CNG), which are up to 95% cleaner than gas- ordiesel-powered vehicles. Currently, OAK has 40 natural gas vehicles in its fleet,including 11 buses that transport workers from the employee parking lot to the terminals.In 2002, OAK and its partner, Clean Energy (formerly Pickens), opened a public access,self-service CNG station at the airports historic North Field. The CNG station is open 24hours a day and provides fuel to Port-owned vehicles; private ground transportationoperators such as taxis, shuttle vans and limos making frequent trips to OAK; otherpublic agencies; and the general public. The fuel station has four dispensers. As of June2007, approximately 600,000 gallons of gas-equivalent fuel has been pumped per year,compared to approximately 100,000 in 2002. With the growing popularity of this station,Clean Energy opened a second CNG station located at on off-airport site on San LeandroAvenue n the spring of 2006. A additional station on Port property in the Jack LondonSquare area was opened in the July 2007.The Ports Board of Port Commissioners has passed two ordinances requiring taxis andground transportation providers, such as door-to-door and hotel shuttles, that have two ormore permits to have 50 percent of their fleet be powered by alternative fuel. And,through the use of incentives and grants, OAKs Alternative Fuel Vehicle Program hasbeen greatly expanded. To date, approximately 70 percent of taxis serving OAK arealternative fuel vehicles. Other ground transportation providers have converted 50percent of their fleets to alternative fuel vehicles. The Port has secured two more grants tohelp offset the cost of purchasing 4 additional off-airport parking shuttles and is theprocess of replacing the five (5) five diesel AirBART shuttle buses with CNG buses. 37
  • 38. Even the air cargo companies at OAK are getting into the "environmental" act.DHL/Airborne Express own and operate four CNG delivery vans at OAK.In 2004, the program was recognized with the Natural Gas Vehicle Coalitions NationalAchievement Award for the CNG program, and was a finalist for the Department ofEnergys National Partner Award for advancing alternative fuels.Rechargeable BatteriesAs the number and types of alternative fuel vehicles increase in popularity in the SanFrancisco Bay Area, OAK has a free battery charging program for travelers using the on-airport parking lots. OAKs electric vehicle charging stations are located in the ValueParkand Hourly lots, and in the Valet lot. The four charging stations have both conductive andinductive hook-ups.Additionally, OAK has introduced a fleet of 15 electric vehicles that are used by staff tomonitor parking lots and roadways, in an effort to reduce vehicle emissions.Ground Service Equipment Alternative Fuel ProgramGround Service Equipment (GSE) refers to the vehicles that provide service to aircraftwhile at the gate. These include baggage loaders, forklifts, food service vehicles, tugsand baggage carts. Most of the current GSE run on gasoline or diesel fuel. OAK iscommitted to working toward converting the entire GSE fleet to alternative fuel tomitigate the potential increase in air emissions by 2010.Electric power for GSE has been installed at each of the seven (7) new gates (26 through32) recently constructed as a part of the Terminal 2 Extension project. Southwest Airlinesis installing rapid battery chargers and will begin using electric baggage loaders. Weexpect that by July 2008 each airline will have a plan in place for using electric GSE.Solar EnergyFedEx, OAKs largest cargo tenant, has implemented a Solar-Power Energy Program atits Oakland hub. In 2005, FedEx installed a 904-kilowatt photovoltaic system atop theroof of its 81,000 square-foot facility that is expected to fuel 80 percent of the facilitysenergy needs. At peak output, the system can produce the equivalent of power used bymore than 900 homes during the daytime. In addition to generating electricity, the solarpanels will help insulate the buildings, further reducing heating and cooling costs.Over the projects expected 30-year lifespan, the systems clean solar electricity willreplace most of the fossil fuel-generated electricity that would have been purchased onthe open market for the facility. Additionally, by avoiding the purchase of fossil-fuelgenerated electricity and implementing energy efficiency measures, this project willreduce carbon dioxide emissions by 10,800 tons over 30 years, equivalent to planting3,000 acres of trees or removing almost 2,100 cars from California roadways. For moreinformation on this Solar Energy Program, click here (Note: add Fact Sheet attachment). 38
  • 39. The Port began installing a 820-kilowatt photovoltaic system at OAK along Ron CowanParkway in June 2007. 820-kilowatts is equivalent to about 20% of the electric powerused at Terminal 1s and 2.Ground Power and Pre-Conditioned Air Loading Bridges forAircraftOAK has installed ground power at all 29 terminal gates. Pre-conditioned air units havebeen installed at all13 gates in Terminal 2 and three (3) of the newly renovated gates inTerminal 1, The remaining gates in Terminal 1 will receive pre-conditioned air units asthey are renovated. By providing these services at the gate, the aircraft will no longerhave to use their own auxiliary power units (APUs) to generate electricity while itsparked at the gate. Because an APU is typically powered by the aircrafts jet fuel, theinstallation of the new ground power and pre-conditioned air units helps to reduce airemissions associated with the use of APUs.Trip Reduction ProgramThe Port coordinates and provides commuter information such as shuttle schedules andtiming, frequency, and stopping points of public transportation providers to serve thetransportation needs of Airport employees and the various tenants.OAK conducted an employee commute survey of airport tenants and staff. This surveyfound that while 87% of respondents indicated they drive to work alone, a significantnumber of them indicated they would, if given some incentive, consider using alternativetransportation. OAK is analyzing the data and will develop a trip reduction program thatwill identify on-site amenities, provide travel demand recommendations, developcommunication material and work with the airlines and other major tenants to provideon-going commute program support.BART-OAK Intermodal Connector (BART Connector)The BART Connector is dependent on funding, development of agreements withstakeholders/partners, and selection of a developer/concessionaire. The U.S. Departmentof Transportation, Federal Transit Administration (FTA) is the federal lead agency for theBART Connector. The project is evaluated in the Final EIR/EIS that was certified andadopted by BART on March 28, 2002 and subsequently updated. The Record ofDecision was issued on July 16, 2002. The current plan is to fund this project using aPublic-Private financing approach.OAK continues to support and promote the development of the BART- OAK Connector.Environmental review of a revised connector alignment has been completed. The BARTConnector could be in operation by 2012, pending funding and selection of theconcessionaire.In the previous 12 months ending in April 2007, AIRBART carried approximately 1.3million riders or roughly 9% of OAK airline passengers. For the past several years,AirBART has experienced a 12.5% annual increase in ridership. OAK employees 39
  • 40. receive a discount for riding AIRBART and approximately 3% of the ridership isattributed to employees.Bicycle AccessIn 2008, OAK completed its $300 million Terminal Improvement Program that includedroadway and curbside improvements such as construction of new Class 1 bike paths andClass 2 bike lanes that now link airport terminals with the cities of Oakland, Alameda andSan Leandro, and the San Francisco Bay Trail. New bike racks are conveniently locatedat both terminals. Download airport map. You can also map your route from home orwork.From: http://www.flyoakland.com/noise/environmental_leed.shtmlLEED CertificationOAK broke ground on its $300 million Terminal Improvement Program in spring 2004.This program is the Ports largest aviation project in its 78-year history and is comprisedof the Terminal 2 Improvement Project using "green building" technology that includes anew concourse with five additional boarding gates and waiting areas; a modern,centralized food, beverage and retail shopping area; expanded ticketing, security andbaggage claim facilities; and new utilities; and the Terminal Roadway and CurbsideProject that will improve terminal access and ease congestion in front of the terminals.Expected completion of the entire program is in 2008.OAK plans to apply for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)certification following improvement program completion. LEED provides a completeframework for assessing building performance and emphasizes water savings, energyefficiency, material selection and indoor environmental quality. In the Terminal 2Improvement Project, some of the areas where green building technologies will appliedare: • Restroom Partitions (made from recycled and other rapidly renewable materials); • Ceiling Tiles (made from recycled materials that have the ability to reflect light, resulting in decreased use of heating and air conditioning systems); • Wall Wainscot (made from recycled materials); and • Restroom Floors (made of terrazzo, a long lasting, durable polished concrete or epoxy material)From: http://www.flyoakland.com/noise/environmental_recycle.shtml 40
  • 41. Recycling/Waste ReductionIn-Terminal RecyclingWith more than 8,000 airport employees and nearly 14.5 million passengers travelingthrough OAK annually, theres a lot of trash generated, much of it recyclable material. OnEarth Day 2002, OAK launched its recycling program to divert discarded newspapers andmagazines; office paper; aluminum and plastic beverage cans and bottles; and plasticfood take-away containers from landfills. The airport has recently enhanced it further byinstalling 35 new recycling stations in the terminals.These additional recycling stations are conveniently located adjacent to a trash receptacleand will encourage greater recycling by identifying the types of acceptable materialthrough visuals on the top and sides of each station. OAK is well on its way to achieve itsgoal of diverting over 50% of post-consumer trash from landfills through thisenhancement. In 2006, the program diverted over 340 tons of material (259 tons ofcardboard/fiber and 81 tons of bottles/can) from landfills.Food Waste RecyclingIn 2004, the airport added food waste to its recycling efforts. The food waste programcollects pre-consumer waste such as vegetable trimmings, coffee grounds and filters,milk cartons, cheesy pizza boxes and used paper towels from airport food concessionairesfor use as high-nutrient fertilizer in the production of organic food and fiber. Over 76 tonsof food waste was diverted from the landfill in 2006 up from 51 tons in 2004 when foodwaste recycling began.Airline Consolidated Waste and Recycling ProgramPrior to 2003, each airline contracted separately with a waste company, resulting ininefficient garbage disposal and inconsistent recycling. Then, in 2003, OAK worked withthe airlines to consolidate their waste and recycling into one coordinated program. Theairlines now recycle magazines, newspaper, cardboard and bottles, diverting over 101tons of recycling from landfills in 2004, resulting in less waste going to the landfills andabout $14,000 in cost savings monthly.Airline Pillow RecyclingOAK in one of the first airports in the nation to participate in a pillow recycling program.Normally, airline pillows are immediately disposed of following the completion of aflight. This waste goes directly into landfills. The pillow recycling program collects thesepillows for use as insulation or as material in making furniture.Portland OR (PDX)From: http://www.portofportland.com/NewsRelease.aspx?newsContent=A_201063105548RCHQopnhseNR23.ascx&topic=Corporate%20News%20Release 41
  • 42. PORTLAND, ORE. (June 3, 2010) – PORT OF PORTLAND HQ OPEN HOUSE TOBE HELD SATURDAYThe Port of Portland is hosting a public open house at its new headquarters building atPortland International Airport on Saturday, June 5 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. This spring,the Port completed a long-term parking garage and consolidated its downtown offices andPDX terminal offices into a new headquarters on top of the garage. The green buildingwas designed to meet Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED, goldcertification standards.The event includes scheduled tours of the environmental features of the buildingincluding: an ecological wastewater treatment system called the Living Machine®system, a 10,000-square-foot eco-roof and a geothermal heating and cooling system.These systems help reduce water usage in the building by 75 percent and energy usage by36 percent…Seattle International (SEA)From: http://www.portseattle.org/news/press/2009/01_14_2009_01.shtmlJanuary 14, 2009Port of Seattle Commission Approves Design for Green Projectat Sea-Tac Airport to Reduce Air Emissions and Save Millions inFuel Costs$20 Million in FAA Grants Anticipated for Pre-Conditioned Air ProjectThe Port of Seattle Commission continued to go ‘green by approving funds to design apre-conditioned air project for Seattle-Tacoma International Airport which will reducegreenhouse gas emissions and save millions of dollars for airlines. Eighty percent of thefunding is anticipated to come from Federal Aviation Administration grants.Once installed, the project is expected to reduce emissions by more than 69,000 metrictons per year and save airlines nearly $400,000 in the first year. The CO2 savings areequal to 2% of the yearly emissions from aircraft at Sea-Tac or the equivalent of taking13,000 cars off the road.The project will allow aircraft to hookup to pre-conditioned air provided by the airport ateach gate. This allows planes to shutdown their auxiliary power units which spew CO2gases and cost the airlines fuel to run. The cooled or heated air would be piped into theaircraft from a central utility plant at the airport.“This investment lowers airline costs and reduces the airports environmental footprint,”said Port of Seattle Commission President Bill Bryant . “It is a win-win for all of us.” 42
  • 43. The project is estimated to cost just over $33 million. The FAA grant, through theVoluntary Low Emissions (VALE) Grant Program, is anticipated to cover nearly $22million. The rest will be paid through Airport Development Funds and a cost perenplanement increase to airlines of $0.12. This cost will be more than offset by decreasedairline operating costs which could save over $19 million over the life of the project,based on fuel costs of $2 per gallon; if fuel costs rise again, the savings would be evengreater.“A centralized pre-conditioned air system is the most cost effective and energy efficientlong term means of providing pre-conditioned air to gated aircraft” said MichaelFeldman, Sea-Tac Airport Deputy Managing Director of Facilities & Environmental.“The positive effects also include reduced noise from aircraft while they are parked at thegates.”Todays Commission action approved $3.77 million for design of the project. Completedesign is scheduled by January 2010 with the start of construction anticipated in July2010 and full completion of the project by December 2012. 43
  • 44. RecommendationsAny formal recommendations should be planned and executed with input frommanagement. I would recommend the following steps be taken: 1. A green initiatives committee should be formed. 2. Input should be sought. 3. Committee weighs the facts and comes up with recommendations.Personal recommendations:Short Term (no cost recommendations) 1. For a reduction in air/noise pollution: (if not implemented), enact an ordinance to require the shut-down of aircraft APU’s while parked on a gate with functioning power and air conditioning/heating. 2. Recycling and waste management: Contact a consultant such as Airport Recycling Specialists www.airportrecycling.com 954-359-7782 or R. W. Beck & Associates www.rwbeck.com 317-575-2830 and inquire about a recycling and waste management program. 3. For energy cost savings: set all Airport Authority building thermostat settings to the following (if not already implemented): Heating: 67 degrees F Cooling: 76 degree F This references tables 3-3 and tables 3-4 on page 60 (48) of the SFO 2009 Green Sustainability plan (http://www.flysfo.com/downloads/sfoclimateactionplan.pdf also found in Chris Homko Projects WINGS folder under Other Airport Green Initiatives as “SFO 2009 Climate Action Plan.PDF”).Long Term Recommendations (requiring further investigation and pay back perioddetermination) 1. Electricity conservation: Taxiway, runway and airport sign lighting bulb replacement with LED’s. 2. Environmental conservation: Reduce usage/recycling of Type I deicing fluid – Infrared deicing. 3. Water conservation: Waterless urinals. 44