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Avoiding plagiarism English Comp

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PowerPoint to accompany plagiarism seminar for a freshman English Composition class.

PowerPoint to accompany plagiarism seminar for a freshman English Composition class.

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  • 1. Avoiding Plagiarism
    Cynthia Holmberg
    April 25, 2011
    Information Literacy Presentation
  • 2. According to a 2008 U.S. News and World Report article:
    “The percentage of students who admit to cheating, which had risen from about 20 percent in the mid-1900s to top 50 percent in 2002, has dropped about 10 percentage points, according to one of the nation's leading cheating experts, Donald McCabe of Rutgers.”
    Clark, Kim. “Taking a Bite Out of Cheating, With the Help of Technology.” U.S. News & World Report.
    11 Oct. 2008: 74. EBSCO Academic Complete. Web. 7 Apr. 2011.
    Plagiarism Declining?
  • 3. Anti-plagiarism Software
    SafeAssign
  • 4. Code of Conduct
    “No student shall engage in plagiarism, which is presenting the words or ideas of another person as if they were the student’s own.  Essays, term papers, laboratory reports, tests, online writing assignments, and other similar requirements must be the work of the student submitting them.”
    Valdosta State University. 2011 Student Handbook. http://www.valdosta.edu/studentaffairs/StudentHandbook.shtml.
  • 5. Class Academic Honesty Policy
    Plagiarism will result in a zero grade on your paper, and could result in an “F” for the course.
    http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSVzX9YBcQ87B5lQ28FR1Y5L7Pi9ELYxv
  • 6. Types of plagiarism.
    When to credit sources.
    Spot plagiarism practice exercise.
    Tips to avoiding plagiarism.
    MLA citation style.
    http://marketing.blogs.ie.edu/archives/mdac%20Objectives.jpg
  • 7. What is Plagiarism?
    http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSe6PZlSBqgTTET7s0YQ_b_uq3XV4FKNBvqINwKJPp_88LsFpaalQ
  • 8. Types of Plagiarism
    Using photos, audio, or video without permission or acknowledgement.
    Copying and pasting text from any web document, website, web journal or online book.
    Using another student’s work or purchasing a paper on line and using it as your own.
    Using your own work without citing it correctly
    Turning in the same paper for more than one class without the permission of both teachers (this is called self-plagiarism)
  • 9. http://t1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTHAbiMcUdwFqyKmpwK1HQ-uTLuUsY6WSMAnhI5PA2aMvkiGYOS&t=1
  • 10. We Care Because . . .
    It’s against the law.
    Ethically, it’s wrong.
    You don’t learn anything.
    Consequences – A zero grade, an F in the class, or expelled.
  • 11. Credit Sources
    • Another person’s ideas, opinion or theory.
    • 12. Facts, statistics, graphs, drawings, photographs.
    • 13. Information that is not common knowledge.
    • 14. Quotations of another person’s actual spoken or written words.
    • 15. Paraphrase another person’s spoken or written words.
  • Example1
    Source
    Wall, David. “Policing the Internet: Maintaining order and law on the cyberbeat” in The Internet, Law and Society. Eds. Akdeniz, Walker and Wall . London:Longman, 2000. 155. Print.
    Original Text
    At the dawn of the twenty-first century, the Internet is rapidly becoming an important part of everyday life. Not only will it continue to shape our future for many years to come, but it is already formulating the ways in which we understand societal change, particularly the debates over modernity. Although mass public use of the Internet has taken place for less than a decade, its social, educational, organisational and commercial benefits are already being felt.
    Paraphrase
    Currently it is clear that the Internet is rapidly becoming important to everyone. It will carry on defining our future, but at the moment it is formulating how we comprehend societal change, particularly modernity. Even though mass public Internet use is a recent occurrence, its organisational, commercial, social and educational rewards are being felt.
  • 16. Original Text
    At the dawn of the twenty-first century, the Internet is rapidly becoming an important part of everyday life. Not only will it continue to shape our future for many years to come, but it is already formulating the ways in which we understand societal change, particularly the debates over modernity. Although mass public use of the Internet has taken place for less than a decade, its social, educational, organisational and commercial benefits are already being felt.
    Source
    Wall, David. “Policing the Internet: Maintaining order and law on the cyberbeat” in The Internet, Law and Society. Eds. Akdeniz, Walker and Wall . London:Longman, 2000. 155. Print.
    Paraphrase
    It has been argued that the Internet, is already defining the ways in which we live and view the world. Although still a relatively recent phenomenon, its widespread day to day use has produced numerous rewards throughout all aspects of society (Wall 155).
    Wall, David. “Policing the Internet: Maintaining Order and Law on the Cyberbeat.“ in The Internet, Law and Society. Eds. Akdeniz,
    Walker and Wall. London:Longman, 2000. 155. Print.
     
  • 17. Example 2
    Original Text
    You've probably seen or heard of natural hot springs on land, like Old Faithful at Yellowstone National Park. Similar phenomena occur under the oceans within mid-ocean ridge volcanoes and are called deep-sea hydrothermal (hot water) vents. They are known as black smokers, like the ones seen above. These black smokers are chimney like structures made up of sulfur-bearing minerals or sulfides that come from beneath Earth's crust. They form when hot (roughly 350degC), mineral-rich water flows out onto the ocean floor through the volcanic lava on a mid-ocean ridge volcano. Sulfide minerals grow or crystallize from the hot water directly onto the volcanic rocks at the place where the hot, mineral-rich water flows from the ground. This crystallization forms a hollow, chimney like sulfide structure through which the hot water continues to flow. As the hot, mineral-rich water rushes out of this chimney and mixes with the cold ocean bottom water, it precipitates a variety of minerals as tiny particles that make the vent water appear black in color. This is why these sulfide chimney structures are called black smokers.
    Source
    AMNH. “Black Smokers,” American Museum of Natural History. 1997. Web. 15 April 2011.
    Paraphrase
    A black smoker is a “chimney like structure made up of sulfur-bearing minerals or sulfides that come from beneath Earth's crust.” (AMNHamnh.org ) They got their name because they look like chimneys and they appear to be belching dark smoke. However, they are not actually burning. Black smokers form on the ocean floor near the mid-ocean ridges. The hot magma heats up the water underground, and when that hot water leaks out it is full of dissolved sulfides. These crystallize either at the vent, forming part of the chimney, or in the water as small black particles, forming the smoke.
  • 18. Original Text
    You've probably seen or heard of natural hot springs on land, like Old Faithful at Yellowstone National Park. Similar phenomena occur under the oceans within mid-ocean ridge volcanoes and are called deep-sea hydrothermal (hot water) vents. They are known as black smokers, like the ones seen above. These black smokers are chimney like structures made up of sulfur-bearing minerals or sulfides that come from beneath Earth's crust. They form when hot (roughly 350degC), mineral-rich water flows out onto the ocean floor through the volcanic lava on a mid-ocean ridge volcano. Sulfide minerals grow or crystallize from the hot water directly onto the volcanic rocks at the place where the hot, mineral-rich water flows from the ground. This crystallization forms a hollow, chimney like sulfide structure through which the hot water continues to flow. As the hot, mineral-rich water rushes out of this chimney and mixes with the cold ocean bottom water, it precipitates a variety of minerals as tiny particles that make the vent water appear black in color. This is why these sulfide chimney structures are called black smokers.
    Source
    AMNH. American Museum of Natural History. “Black Smokers,” www.amnh.org. 1997. Web. 15 April 2011.
    Paraphrase
    A black smoker is a “chimney like structure made up of sulfur-bearing minerals or sulfides that come from beneath Earth's crust.” (AMNHamnh.org ) They got their name because they look like chimneys and they appear to be belching dark smoke. However, they are not actually burning. Black smokers form on the ocean floor near the mid-ocean ridges. The hot magma heats up the water underground, and when that hot water leaks out it is full of dissolved sulfides. These crystallize either at the vent, forming part of the chimney, or in the water as small black particles, forming the smoke.
    American Museum of Natural History (AMNH). “Black Smokers,” www.amnh.org. 1997. Web.
    15 April 2011.
  • 19. Source: Frick, T. (1991). Restructuring education through technology. Bloomington, IN: Phi Delta Kappa Educational Foundation.
    Example 3
    Original Text
    Schools currently seem to be in a mad rush to adopt computers and other information technology. They are facing increased pressure from parents, students and business leaders to do so. I believe that this information technology revolution that we are now experiencing will eventually lead to transformation of our present educational systems.
    Source
    Frick, Theodore (1991). Restructuring education through technology. Bloomington, IN: Phi Delta Kappa Educational Foundation.
    Paraphrase
    Frick predicted that the information technology revolution would lead to a transformation in our educational system (1991).
     
  • 20. Original Text
    Schools currently seem to be in a mad rush to adopt computers and other information technology. They are facing increased pressure from parents, students and business leaders to do so. I believe that this information technology revolution that we are now experiencing will eventually lead to transformation of our present educational systems.
    Source
    Frick, Theodore.
    Restructuring education through technology. Bloomington, IN: Phi Delta Kappa Educational Foundation. 1991.
    Paraphrase
    Frick predicted that the information technology revolution would lead to a transformation in our educational system (1991).
    Frick, Theodore. Restructuring education through technology. Bloomington, IN: Phi Delta Kappa Educational Foundation.
     
  • 21. Incorrect Paraphrasing
    Using another person’s phrases or sentences without putting quotation marks around them or providing a parenthetical citation is considered plagiarism even if you cite the source in your “Works Cited”!
    Copying something out of a book, magazine, or off the internet and changing every couple of words is not paraphrasing. It is plagiarism.
  • 22. Tips to Avoiding Plagiarism
    Plan your paper.
    Don’t procrastinate.
    Take good notes:
    Use quotes.
    Write down citation information – name of work, author, publisher, City, date, page #s or web address.
    Resist the urge to use copy & paste commands.
    When in doubt – cite it, or ask you instructor.
  • 23. http://t1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTDmg1PTL3ud2QOQ0hFGvgn3TVCzaUH3GBu4cYJIcE-mCvjeSauFQ
  • 24. MLA Citation Style
    Where can I get help?
    http://www.lib.lsu.edu/instruction/tigertail/nf/module3/images/plagiarism.
  • 25. Where to find MLA Guides.
    Perdue Online Writing Lab/MLA Guide
    http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/
    Valdosta State University Odum Library MLA Guide
    http://www.valdosta.edu/library/learn/mlaguide.shtml
  • 26. Practice Assignment
    Write a citation for each of these sources:
    Book (one or more authors)
    Article from a scholarly journal (print)
    Article from a scholarly journal (electronic database)
    Information from a website
    Paraphrase the passage you cite in your own words.
    Including a small quote is acceptable. Compile a Works Cited page.
  • 27. http://vsuavoidplagiarism.weebly.com/
    Cindy Holmberg
    I can’t remember a thing she said!
    xxxxxxxxxx@valdosta.edu