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Realistic portraits - How to render Part II
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Realistic portraits - How to render Part II

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A. Learning Goals …

A. Learning Goals
1. Content: 1) Students will analyze the Essential Question: “What relevance is the Renaissance period to realistic portrait drawing?” 2) Students will learn of the Historical importance of Leonardo da Vinci and Botticelli as Portrait Artists during the Renaissance, as well as contemporary and current examples from professional and student portrait artists. 2) Students will learn how to create a basic portrait guideline, position and draw in human face features.
2. Language: 1) Read, discuss, analyze the Essential Question. Select and write answers from a pre-questioning study guide portrait activity; 2) View and write notes on a Portrait Presentation showing Historical, current professional and student portrait images. Discuss and interpret new terminology; 3) Draw a proportionately aligned face features by selecting, analyzing and validating reasoning from sufficient evidence. 3a) Differentiated students will apply a guideline template under a page in sketchbook prior to drawing their face features.

B. Relevance: Students will understand the relevance why light and shadow is important when creating a 3-dimensional realistic portrait; understand correct reasoning behind sfumato and chiaroscuro techniques, and each student will see sufficient evidence why portrait guidelines should be used for proper face feature positioning, especially if there is no grid method used.

Published in: Education, Art & Photos

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  • 1. Realistic Portrait Drawing -Part II- 1. Portraits in History 3. Getting Started: Positioning & Measuring 2. Contemporary Portrait Artists & student examples. 5. Interactive Mona Lisa & Tidbits 4. Drawing the Portrait: Features & Tonal Drawing Presented by Mrs.Chojnacky (part I was face features)
  • 2. Famous Portraits in History the Renaissance Period
  • 3. One of the Most Famous Portraits in History! The Mona Lisa By Leonardo da Vinci (1503-1506), Oil Painting on panel, permanent collection at the Louvre, Paris, France.
  • 4. Leonardo da Vinci and other artists were part of the Italian Renaissance. The Renaissance was a cultural movement that sparked realism and human emotions in art. It profoundly affected European intellectual life from 1400-1500’s. Beginning in Italy, its influence was felt in literature, philosophy, art, music, politics, science, religion.
  • 5. Here is a portion of the painting “The Birth of Venus” by Sandro Botticelli, 1486, drawn 20 years earlier to the Mona Lisa.
  • 6. Here is Botticelli’s full painting “The Birth of Venus”, c. 1486, created during the early period of the Renaissance. Painting hangs in the Uffizi Gallery in Florence, Italy.
  • 7. Renaissance artists used techniques that launched a 3-dimensional & realistic look to the face.
  • 8. Look closely in these BW versions… Write down 2 artistic techniques that Leonardo da Vinci uses in Mona, but Botticelli falls short of in this portrait of Venus.
  • 9. Leonardo da Vinci also used a technique called Chiaroscuro, which means creating a skillful balance of light and dark in a painting, with strong contrasts to create dramatic effect. Leonardo da Vinci broke through the flat-like portraiture by creating subtle gradations of tone which were used to subdue sharp edges and create 3-D form called Sfumato.
  • 10. You have been learning to draw the Chiaroscuro, dramatic effects of light and dark by pushing the gradient values on a 10 point scale; with the Goddess, marshmallow study, animal and soon in your portrait assignment. You have been learning to draw using the Sfumato technique in your Goddess folds study, your landscape study, your animal. You will apply this technique to your portrait.
  • 11. Self-portrait ink sketch of Leonardo da Vinci!
  • 12. Leonardo made thousands of sketches for studies to hundreds of paintings. This is a study for the Virgin and Child with St. Anne. 1506-10 .
  • 13. 1506-10 1506-10 1506-10 1506-10 This is the full painting of The Virgin and Child with St. Anne. 1508-1510 where Leonardo was continuing to create more realistic-like portraits using sfumato.
  • 14. Self-Portrait of Albrecht Durer, 1500. Click here to see a better copy on the web…
  • 15. Documentary Portraits in History Before the invention of Photography
  • 16. Portrait of Sir Francis Bacon, Renaissance author, 1561-1626
  • 17. Portrait of Benjamin Franklin, 1706-1790.
  • 18. Portrait of President Thomas Jefferson, 1743 - 1826
  • 19. Portrait of Edgar Allen Poe, 18091849.
  • 20. Portrait of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Author of Famous Sherlock Holmes. 1859-1930
  • 21. Graphite Portraits by Contemporary Professional Artists Commissioned & Free-lanced Examples
  • 22. Portrait of Jake Gyllenhaal by Anne, 1982
  • 23. Portraits of 2010 model for an advertisement & Adam Brody by Annie Teubert, 1982 . Currently resides in Germany- Very Famous International Celebrity Portrait Artist! http://www.anne-teubert.de/start.html
  • 24. Portrait by Anne, 1982
  • 25. Portrait of DMX by Nate Johnson
  • 26. Portrait of Morgan Freeman by Nate Johnson
  • 27. Portrait of Marilyn Monroe by Eddie Smyth, 2004
  • 28. akiane~ child artist Permission given in person - by Akiane.
  • 29. Those who went to the “Akiane” exhibit, did you see this 4 foot Portrait Painting? Permission given in person - by Akiane.
  • 30. Portrait of Jennifer Love Hewitt by Brian Duey
  • 31. Portrait by Brian Duey, 2005
  • 32. SelfPortrait, “Introspection”, artist: Brian Duey.
  • 33. Close-up of a graphite self-portrait…Look at the eye!
  • 34. Zoom out of the selfportrait…Look at eye in relationship to the ear!
  • 35. Close-up of the selfportrait in area of his hair!
  • 36. Commissioned portrait By Nicholas Santoleri
  • 37. Commissioned portrait loosely rendered by Bill Mather
  • 38. Commissioned portrait loosely rendered by Bill Mather
  • 39. Commissioned detailed portrait of AnneMarie By Nicholas Santoleri
  • 40. Wanted by the FBI face portrait by Carrie Stuart Parks http://stuartpark s.com/
  • 41. Concept Portraiture rendering by Armin Mersmann A Surrealistic montage called “Blind leadsBlind”
  • 42. Chuck Close, Photorealist painter. Another approach to realistic selfportraits.
  • 43. Graphite Portraits by Drawing 1 Students Examples from 2008- 2011 Boise High
  • 44. Russian Woman by Sarah W., Drawing 1, Boise High 2010.
  • 45. Portrait by Erin S., Drawing 1, Boise High 2010.
  • 46. Simply Happy by Jennifer H, Drawing 1, Boise High 2009.
  • 47. RetteMich by Tailee L., Drawing 1, Boise High 2009-10.
  • 48. Portrait by Breanne, Drawing 1, Boise High 2010.
  • 49. Stare By Coti S., Drawing II, Boise High 2010.
  • 50. Portrait by Jessica S., Drawing 1, Boise High 2010.
  • 51. Getting Started… Portrait Layout Learning Guidelines to Position & Measure Face Features
  • 52. You will complete a portrait guideline that you can use as a future resource; another option to GRIDDING Let’s Begin with an oval, egg shaped head…
  • 53. Look at your subject. Is their head long, short or regular? Can you see the difference in these oval shapes?
  • 54. Long oval shape Draw your oval shape first! Regular oval shape Short oval shape Here’s a little guide: The head is basically 4 eyes wide. Can you figure how the 4th eye fits in the width?
  • 55. Draw a lightly sketched layout of the ears!
  • 56. DRAW ALL THE GUIDELINES BEFORE RENDERING! Eye line Nose mid-line Start by drawing a line to divide the oval 1/2 vertically and 1/2 horizontally.
  • 57. Lowest nose point line Add horizontal line 1/2 way between middle & chin.
  • 58. Lower lip line Add another horizontal line little less than 1/2 way between the nose line & chin.
  • 59. Brow line Add another horizontal line ABOVE the middle line, along the inner top fold of the ear.
  • 60. Nose Wing width Add a rectangle box from the brow line, down to just above the bottom nose line…. This is a guideline for the width of the nose wings. Hint: It is ¼ of the oval width.
  • 61. The red lines are drawn later. Start from the inner white of the eyes and down to the lip line. Mouth Width Try to draw the mouth (lips) after the eyes and nose are drawn.
  • 62. Let’s review the guidelines using an actual portrait….
  • 63. Start by drawing rectangular box around the oval face….
  • 64. Visualize an oval touching the top and bottom of the box.
  • 65. Eye line: Draw a line to divide the oval 1/2 vertically and 1/2 horizontally; should intersect the center of each pupil.
  • 66. Nose length: Horizontal line 1/2 way between middle & chin.
  • 67. Brow Line: Add another horizontal line ABOVE the middle line, along the inner top fold of the ear. Lower lip line: Add another horizontal line 1/2 way between the nose line & chin.
  • 68. Nose Wing Width: Add a rectangle box from the brow line, down to just above the bottom nose line…. Hint: It is ¼ of the oval width.
  • 69. Nose width & eye width: The nostrils will usually be a little wider than the width of one eye!
  • 70. The red lines are drawn later. Start from the inner white of the eyes and down to the lip line. The mouth (lips) should not be drawn in until the eyes and nose are drawn.
  • 71. The red and orange lines show the width of eyes and in between. Are they the same? Now, it is your turn to draw your own portrait guideline resource!
  • 72. Another way to measure proportions, width and height for a human head with shadows! Now, it is your turn to draw your own portrait guideline resource!
  • 73. Another way to measure proportions, width and height for a human head- 5 eye widths across! Now, it is your turn to draw your own portrait guideline resource!
  • 74. Another way to measure proportions, width and height for a human head- 6-7 eye widths in length! Now, it is your turn to draw your own portrait guideline resource!
  • 75. Now, it is your turn to draw your own portrait guideline resource!
  • 76. Concludes the Presentation on Realistic Portrait Drawing -Part II-