Stewarding technology for communities   Nancy   White Full Circle Associates http://www.flickr.com/photos/nicmcphee/335561...
Potential Agenda (we can deviate!) <ul><ul><li>Introductions via &quot;Human Spectrogram&quot;  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li...
 
http://technologyforcommunities.com/
Tech + Social: Technology has  fundamentally  changed how we can  be together
Labels!!! Learning Communities Knowledge Networks Communities of Practice Online Communities Knowledge Networks
Communities of Practice <ul><li>A group of people... </li></ul><ul><li>Who share challenges, passions or interest </li></u...
Many: Networks We:   Communities Me: the Individual Personal  identity, interest & trajectory Bounded  membership; group i...
http://www.flickr.com/photos/dnorman/436670816/
Many: Networks We:   Communities Me: the Individual Individual learning, personal learning environments … Classes, informa...
Many: Networks We:   Communities Me: the Individual Personal  identity, interest & trajectory Bounded  membership; group i...
http://www.flickr.com/photos/dsevilla/189528500/in/set-1368427/ Emerging roles and practices…
enable people to… <ul><li>discover & appropriate useful  technology </li></ul><ul><li>be in and use  communities & network...
<ul><li>community  leaders </li></ul><ul><li>technology  stewards </li></ul><ul><li>network  weavers </li></ul>
What the %&*# is a  technology steward? http://www.flickr.com/photos/dani3l3/364684710/ Nancy White Full Circle Associates
http://www.flickr.com/photos/dani3l3/364684710/ “ Technology stewards are people with enough experience of the workings of...
Stewardship typically includes selecting and configuring technology, as well as supporting its use in the practice of the ...
http://www.flickr.com/photos/maykesplana/270819284/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/shannonpareil/107865884/
 
http://www.flickr.com/photo_zoom.gne?id=137506981&size=o http://www.flickr.com/photos/paulwatson/212446246/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/amstrad/29854045/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/philwalter/348238734/
rules of thumb http://www.flickr.com/photos/angelamcdonald/94766928/in/photostream/
15% solution <ul><li>Noticing  and using the influence,  discretion and power  individuals   have  right now . </li></ul><...
addressing inherent community tensions Group Individual Interacting Publishing asynchronous synchronous discussion  boards...
Togetherness  Separateness Interacting/participation  Publishing/reification Individual  Group
TOGETHERNESS  SEPARATENESS http://www.flickr.com/photos/angerboy/201582453/
community time community space shifting engagement….
http://www.flickr.com/photos/worldcafe/227358678 / INTERACTING  PUBLISHING
http://www.flickr.com/photos/worldcafe/227358678 / INTERACTING  PUBLISHING
Vocabularies, tools, concepts, methods, stories, papers, pictures, reports… Conversing, experimenting, practicing, learnin...
INDIVIDUAL  GROUP
Designed for groups, experienced as individuals Does not imply homogeneity Multimembership Attention
Tool polarities:  F2F  and  Wikis From John D. Smith http://www.learningalliances.net Synchronous Asynchronous Rhythm Part...
Conversation: Your Big Questions,  then break time!
Orientations
Digital Habitats  Orientation  Spidergram Activity From: Digital Habitats: stewarding technology for communities Etienne W...
…  meetings …  relationships …  community cultivation …  access to expertise …  projects …  context …  individual particip...
<ul><li>Meetings  – in person or online gatherings with an agenda (i.e. monthly topic calls) </li></ul><ul><li>Projects  –...
activities   oriented to … Example:   The Birdwatchers of Central Park …  open-ended   conversation …  meetings …  project...
activities   oriented to … Community Name:  KM4Dev global knowledge sharing network …  open-ended   conversation …  meetin...
activities   oriented to … Birdwatchers  and  KM4Dev-ers …  open-ended   conversation …  meetings …  projects …  access to...
What can we do with this? <ul><li>Identify where your community/group/team is now to assess for design, facilitation and t...
activities   oriented to … Community Name: …  open-ended   conversation …  meetings …  projects …  access to expertise …  ...
<ul><li>Meetings  – Web meeting tools for online, shared calendars and wikis for planning, wikis, blogs, images/audio/vide...
Building a  CASE  Together… <ul><li>Group form: small, pairs, or full group? </li></ul><ul><li>Visibility: Public or priva...
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lynetter/421323707/in/set-72057594139269787 /
http://www.flickr.com/photos/angelrays/354572601/
http://www.technologyforcommunity.com http://www.fullcirc.com/weblog/onfacblog.htm Tag:  technologystewardship http://www....
Epilogue Slides:  will be posted on  slideshare.net (choconancy) Other stuff: http://onlinefacilitation.wikispaces.com/ ht...
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Technology Stewardship Workshop Slides Nov09

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Slides used for a series of workshops in Australia. These are NOT a full presentation, but images I draw upon

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  • Technology has fundamentally changed what it means to “be together.” In the digital age, there is a new set of practices and roles to support this “being together” – we call this technology stewardship. http://www.flickr.com/photos/poagao/527259919/
  • Much of what I’m going to share comes from the work Etienne Wenger, John Smith and I have been doing as part of a book we wrote together: “Digital Habitats: Stewarding Technology for Communities.” You can read more about the book at http://technologyforcommunities.com Photo credits: Nancy White Painting: Honoria Starbuck
  • As we dug into the PRACTICES of technology stewardship, we realized they were part of a system, a habitat in which a group, community or network interacted. That there were intersections between the defined set of tools in a group and those used by individuals. There were overlaps and disconnects.
  • We have sought to find new labels for these ways of “being together.” What has been significant for me is that they express a continuum of being together.
  • You can be clear when we talk about the individual, me. We can be clear when we have bounded communities with clear establishment of in/out membership. We can also have communities with fuzzy boundaries, which may even be networks.
  • You can be clear when we talk about the individual, me. We can be clear when we have bounded communities with clear establishment of in/out membership. We can also have communities with fuzzy boundaries, which may even be networks.
  • You can be clear when we talk about the individual, me. We can be clear when we have bounded communities with clear establishment of in/out membership. We can also have communities with fuzzy boundaries, which may even be networks.
  • Not clearly demarcated, but there are new roles and practices we are all taking on. http://www.flickr.com/photos/dsevilla/189528500/in/set-1368427/ Uploaded on July 14, 2006 by dsevilla
  • These roles and practices create the conditions that enable people to….
  • Three roles that I’ve been looking at are community leaders, network weavers and technology stewards. Community leaders are a more familiar role, helping defined groups achieve specific goals over a period of time. “Helping” may mean creating conditions, supporting the emergence of relationships or individual and/or group identity, managing, etc. Network weavers are a new role (See the work of June Holley et al at http://www.networkweaving.com/blog/) – “people who facilitate new connections and increase the quality of those connections.” In between community leaders and network weavers are technology stewards – they show up both in groups/communities AND networks.
  • Ten years ago, when someone wanted to set up a set of tools to support a community of practice, they called up IT. Install Lotus notes. “Give me a SharePoint set up.” And that was that. Communities rarely had control of their online environments. There was a gulf between designers and users. Unless of course, they were coders. Now we have access to a wide variety of tools, some of which are technically difficult to set up, and others that are available at a click of the button. Who is paying attention to these tools? Photo credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/dani3l3/364684710/
  • Technology stewardship is not a solo gig, but by, of and for the community. It is about that balance between control and emergence, between &amp;quot;self-organizing&amp;quot; and &amp;quot;organizing on behalf of others.&amp;quot; It balances the wisdom of the group, with the reality of getting things done.
  • Stewardship typically includes selecting and configuring technology, as well as supporting its use in the practice of the community.” It’s not just an “up front set up role” but something that is part of the life of the community. Etienne Wenger says &apos;Design and little and practice a lot.&apos;  That applies to any aspect of community leadership!
  • Tech stewardship goes far beyond the traditional IT tech support. It is tech with a community attitude, attention to how to adapt a tool to a community’s quirks and practices. It is about seeing and representing the community perspective first. Photo credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/maykesplana/270819284/
  • We also recognized that technology stewardship can be about protecting a community from unwanted technology, from change that is so disruptive it fractures the community. It is balancing innovation with stable and productive practices. Noticing when not to use technology. When to just say NO! Like anything else, technology stewards can damage or limit their communities of they aren’t careful. This is not a romantic, utopian vision. Photo credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/shannonpareil/107865884/
  • Technology stewardship has deep roots in the technology community. The initial revolution came when communities of technologists made their own tools for connecting and working together. Linus Torvolds called his community to create -- and it resulted in Linux. Designed with a community perspective, for a community. Photo credit: Nancy White
  • Today it’s a whole new game. We don’t have to accept what IT offers. We don’t have to be coders. We have a range of tools to use to do stuff together online. We can configure and integrate without knowing programming. Communities have options. So they need technology stewardship skills and practices Photo credits and source: http://www.flickr.com/photo_zoom.gne?id=137506981&amp;size=o http://www.flickr.com/photos/paulwatson/212446246/ http://business2.blogs.com/business2blog/2006/08/web_20_around_t.html
  • We have more ways of “being together” as we cross national, professional, and linguistic borders.  Our communities have become network like. Globalization. Our CoPs are no longer just products of our workplaces or associations. They are ours. And we have influence on our tools. Photo credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/amstrad/29854045/
  • Technology stewardship is not a solo gig, but by, of and for the community. It is about that balance between control and emergence, between &amp;quot;self-organizing&amp;quot; and &amp;quot;organizing on behalf of others.&amp;quot; It balances the wisdom of the group, with the reality of getting things done. Photo credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/philwalter/348238734/
  • On the practical side, we’ll explore a few &amp;quot;rules of thumb&amp;quot; and  strategies for thoughtfully considering how we focus on technology stewardship in a Web 2.0 world from a community perspective. http://www.flickr.com/photos/angelamcdonald/94766928/in/photostream/ Uploaded on February 2, 2006 by ang (3 Girls &amp; a Boy)
  • It is often improvisational and emergent. Rarely do communities have the luxury of time, money and talent to do complex technology implementation. So the ability to use what is at hand and make it work now is a crucial community stewardship practice. (More about Keith: http://socialinvention.net/aboutus.aspx)
  • A tech steward may be called upon to make sense of all the offerings of the market, scanning and selecting for her community. They start paying attention to working with the tensions between the individual and the group, synch and asynch group, interacting and publishing. Image credit: Wenger, White and Smith
  • Sliders – as we think about how we pick, design and deploy technology, what sort of intentionality do we want with respect to these tensions? More importantly, how do we use them as ways to track our community’s health, make adjustments in both technology and practice.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/angerboy/201582453/ The elements of time and space present a challenge for communities. Forming a community requires more than one transient conversation or having the same job title in completely different settings. The kind of learning that communities of practice strive for requires a sustained process of mutual engagement, and if mutual engagement is the key to learning, separation in time and space can make community difficult. How can a community sustain an experience of togetherness across the boundaries of time and space? How can members experience togetherness through shared activities if they cannot be together face-to-face? How can the togetherness of a few members (a small meeting, a conversation) become an experience the whole community shares?  
  • Technology creates “community time” that defies schedules and time zones, and “communal spaces” that do not depend on physical location. One obvious appeal of technology is its variety of solutions for dealing with time and space to achieve continuity and togetherness: to hold a meeting at a distance, to converse across time zones, to make a recording of a teleconference available, to include people who cannot be physically present, to send a request or a file, or to be up-to-date on an interesting project. In a community version of “time shifting” and even “space shifting,” togetherness happens in a variety of formats that enable participation “anytime, anywhere.” Practice issues: Community profiles as patterns of togetherness. How do we learn best. Respect the time of each member. Front or back channel, what problems to bring to the whole group.
  • Members of a community of practice need to interact with each other as well as produce and share artifacts such as documents, tools, and links to resources. Sharing artifacts without interacting can inhibit the ability to negotiate the meaning of what is being shared. Interacting without producing artifacts can limit the extent and impact of learning. Indeed, the theory of communities of practice views learning together as involving the interplay of two fundamental processes of meaning making: Members engage directly in activities, interactions, conversations, reflections, and other forms of personal participation in the learning of the community; members produce physical and conceptual artifacts—words, tools, concepts, methods, stories, documents, and other forms of reification —that reflect their shared experience and around which they organize their participation. (Literally, reification means “making into an object.”) Meaningful learning in a community requires both processes to be present. Sometimes one may dominate the other. They may not always be complementary to each other. The challenge of this polarity is how successfully communities cycle between the two.  
  • Technology provides so many new ways to interact and publish while supporting the interplay of participation and reification that it can profoundly change the experience of learning together. Technology enables new kinds of interactions, activities, and access to other people. It also provides new ways to produce, share, and organize the results of being together – through documents, media files, and other artifacts. Most important, it affords new ways to combine participation and reification. For instance, by providing a web-based whiteboard for a conversation, we are supporting new forms of co-authorship where we casually mix words, images and sounds with each other . Technology also pushes the boundaries of both interacting and publishing for a community. It makes it easier for the work of a community to be opened up to the larger world. It can allow a community to decide whether to publish artifacts and invite comments publicly or to hold them within the private boundaries of the community.
  • Examples of publishing and interacting (or participation and reification.)
  • Individuals and groups. Togetherness is a property of communities but individual members experience it in their own ways. A crucial point about learning within communities of practice is that being together does not imply, require, or produce homogeneity. Togetherness is a complex state that weaves communal and individual engagement, aspirations, and identities. Technology provides new opportunities for togetherness, but togetherness can lead to disagreement and the discovery that people see the world (including technology) very differently. Members use the technology individually, on their own. Some social trends contribute to the tension inherent in this polarity: Increasingly, individuals are not members of only one community; they are participants in a substantial number of communities, teams, and networks—active in some, less so in others. Communities cannot expect to have the full attention of their members nor can they assume that all their members have the same levels of commitment and activity, the same learning aspirations, and therefore the same needs. Conversely, members must deal with the increasing volume and complexity of their “multi-membership” in different communities. They have to find meaningful participation in all these relationships while preserving a sense of their own identity across contexts.  
  • One role of technology is to help manage the complexities of community life and individual participation. Technology can make the community visible in new ways through directories, maps of member locations, participation statistics, and graphic representations of the health of the community. It can provide tools for individuals to filter information to fit their needs, to locate others, to find connections, to know when and where important activities are taking place, and to gather the news feeds from their various communities in one place. In fact, multi-membership is becoming so prevalent that tools to manage the group/individual polarity are becoming an increasingly central contribution of technology.
  • Rhythms, Interactions, Identities. Sharepoint Wiki pages are useful in and of themselves with the polarities as we experience them. We can fit them into the your community’s configuration in ways that balance the polarities.
  • As we looked at a variety of communities of practice in our book research, we noticed that there activities that showed up in many communities. Not all of them in every community, but some were more important than others for each community.
  • This activity comes out of a chapter in our book that looks at the activity orientations of communities of practice and how this might drive both the technology stewardship and the overall community nurturing and leadership activities. In this context, we are using it to explore the application of social media to a particular goal you might have.
  • In our research of CoPs we noticed 9 general patterns of activities that characterized a community’s orientation. Most had a mix, but some were more prominent in every case. Image: Wenger, White and Smith, 2007
  • Before you do the Spidergram exercise, read through the orientations and think of some examples from a number of contexts. I’ll offer two examples as well in subsequent slides.
  • Here is an example drawn from the book “Red-Tails in Love: Pale Male’s Story -- A True Wildlife Drama in Central Park” by Marie Winn. Vintage Books, 2005 The book tells of a community of bird watchers in Central Park and exquisitely describes their practices. This is a predominantly face to face group that might use some social media, but not as their central way of interacting. They are a large, diverse group, but tightly geographically bound to Central Park in New York City. They might fill this spidergram differently than I might, but this is just an example! Image: Wenger, White and Smith, 2007
  • KM4Dev (http://www.km4dev.org) is a global network of practitioners interested in knowledge management and knowledge sharing in international development. Over 800 members are subscribed to the email list which had it’s origins in July 2000. It is both a well established but loosely bounded network that interacts primarily online, with once a year meetings that a small subset attend.
  • You can see how different groups have different priorities. It is a bit like a community activity “finger print.” The next step is to think about what tools support the different orientations.
  • What was interesting was that these orientations had implications beyond communities. They could be a useful analysis, diagnostic and measurement tool for the application of social media to an organization’s work.
  • What would your Spidergram look like? Think of a specific group or project that you want to explore. What activities do you need to support? Which are more important than others? Put a mark on the arrow to indicate how important a particular orientation is to your community. The more important the orientation, the further out on the arrow the dot should be placed. Then draw a line between the dots. Clarification: For context, towards the middle means a more inward (private) orientation and towards the outer edge a more public/open orientation. Discuss the spidergram with your group or community. Do they see it differently? Adjust your image to get the fullest view possible. Then, and only then, start thinking about tools. Always start with WHAT you want to do before the HOW!
  • Here are some examples of social media tools that support the orientations. Keep in mind that while a tool may have been designed for a specific purpose, people regularly and imaginatively use them in different ways.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/lynetter/421323707/in/set-72057594139269787/ Here’s the quote in full: &amp;quot;It is when people stop thinking of something as a piece of technology that the thing starts to have its biggest impact. Wheels, wells, books, spectacles were all once wonders of the world; now they are everywhere, and we can&apos;t live without them. The internet hasn&apos;t quite got to that point, but it is getting there.&amp;quot; - The Guardian Nov 4 2006 technology.guardian.co.uk/news/story/0,,1940641,00.html?g... Image from Flickr CC www.flickr.com/photos/mr_magoo_icu/172281846/ thanks to Mr Magoo ICU  Add your co
  • Our work started in the nest of communities of practice, but we have already seen the applicability of the frameworks we are developing in other types of communities: teams, groups and networks. As we test these ideas in real settings, we’re finding resonance for this community perspective on technology. Photo credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/angelrays/354572601/
  • Interested in more? Keep in touch with Etienne, John and me via the book blog on my blog at the ridiculous URL on your screen . Tag resources technologystewardship on your favorite tagging engine. Tell me a story about your technology stewardship. Or, ask me later. Photo credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/cgommel/138167164/ All photos from Flickr are photos with Creative Commons licenses. Thanks to Beth Kanter, Etienne Wenger, John Smith, and Bev Trayner for their input.
  • Technology Stewardship Workshop Slides Nov09

    1. 1. Stewarding technology for communities Nancy White Full Circle Associates http://www.flickr.com/photos/nicmcphee/33556189/in/set-72157594373420115/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/poagao/494418919/
    2. 2. Potential Agenda (we can deviate!) <ul><ul><li>Introductions via &quot;Human Spectrogram&quot; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The talky part - introducing the concepts of technology stewardship, a couple of frameworks.  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If you were to walk away with an answer to one big question, what question would you ask? World Cafe and/or Card sorting? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Break </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Domain and Spidergram activity including debrief </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>So what about technology? Stories of use. Alternative: Kanter/Wilcox social media game Wrap up – where to keep learning e to keep learning/practicing </li></ul></ul>
    3. 4. http://technologyforcommunities.com/
    4. 5. Tech + Social: Technology has fundamentally changed how we can be together
    5. 6. Labels!!! Learning Communities Knowledge Networks Communities of Practice Online Communities Knowledge Networks
    6. 7. Communities of Practice <ul><li>A group of people... </li></ul><ul><li>Who share challenges, passions or interest </li></ul><ul><li>Interact regularly </li></ul><ul><li>Who learn with and from each other </li></ul><ul><li>Improve their ability to do what they care about ---- Etienne Wenger </li></ul>
    7. 8. Many: Networks We: Communities Me: the Individual Personal identity, interest & trajectory Bounded membership; group identity, shared interest Boundaryless; fuzzy, intersecting interests
    8. 9. http://www.flickr.com/photos/dnorman/436670816/
    9. 10. Many: Networks We: Communities Me: the Individual Individual learning, personal learning environments … Classes, informal learning cohorts, conferences, clubs… Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Wikipedia, etc…
    10. 11. Many: Networks We: Communities Me: the Individual Personal identity, interest & trajectory Bounded membership; group identity, shared interest Boundaryless; fuzzy, intersecting interests
    11. 12. http://www.flickr.com/photos/dsevilla/189528500/in/set-1368427/ Emerging roles and practices…
    12. 13. enable people to… <ul><li>discover & appropriate useful technology </li></ul><ul><li>be in and use communities & networks (people) </li></ul><ul><li>express their identity </li></ul><ul><li>find and create content </li></ul><ul><li>usefully participate </li></ul>
    13. 14. <ul><li>community leaders </li></ul><ul><li>technology stewards </li></ul><ul><li>network weavers </li></ul>
    14. 15. What the %&*# is a technology steward? http://www.flickr.com/photos/dani3l3/364684710/ Nancy White Full Circle Associates
    15. 16. http://www.flickr.com/photos/dani3l3/364684710/ “ Technology stewards are people with enough experience of the workings of a community to understand its technology needs, and enough experience with technology to take leadership in addressing those needs…
    16. 17. Stewardship typically includes selecting and configuring technology, as well as supporting its use in the practice of the community.” Wenger, White and Smith, 2007
    17. 18. http://www.flickr.com/photos/maykesplana/270819284/
    18. 19. http://www.flickr.com/photos/shannonpareil/107865884/
    19. 21. http://www.flickr.com/photo_zoom.gne?id=137506981&size=o http://www.flickr.com/photos/paulwatson/212446246/
    20. 22. http://www.flickr.com/photos/amstrad/29854045/
    21. 23. http://www.flickr.com/photos/philwalter/348238734/
    22. 24. rules of thumb http://www.flickr.com/photos/angelamcdonald/94766928/in/photostream/
    23. 25. 15% solution <ul><li>Noticing and using the influence, discretion and power individuals have right now . </li></ul><ul><li> – Keith McCandless </li></ul>http://socialinvention.net/liberatingstructures.aspx
    24. 26. addressing inherent community tensions Group Individual Interacting Publishing asynchronous synchronous discussion boards teleconference chat instant messaging member directory wiki blog telephony/ VoIP individual profile page e-mail e-mail lists scratch pad RSS “ new” indicators subscription podcast content repository presence indicator buddy list security Q&A systems RSS aggregator newsletter calendar videoconference application sharing whiteboard site index participation statistics search subgroups personalization community public page version control document management UseNet content rating scheduling polling commenting networking tools tagging bookmarking shared filtering geomapping interest filter 2007 Etienne Wenger, Nancy White and John Smith Wenger, White and Smith, 2009 http://www.technologyforcommunities.com
    25. 27. Togetherness Separateness Interacting/participation Publishing/reification Individual Group
    26. 28. TOGETHERNESS SEPARATENESS http://www.flickr.com/photos/angerboy/201582453/
    27. 29. community time community space shifting engagement….
    28. 30. http://www.flickr.com/photos/worldcafe/227358678 / INTERACTING PUBLISHING
    29. 31. http://www.flickr.com/photos/worldcafe/227358678 / INTERACTING PUBLISHING
    30. 32. Vocabularies, tools, concepts, methods, stories, papers, pictures, reports… Conversing, experimenting, practicing, learning, planning…
    31. 33. INDIVIDUAL GROUP
    32. 34. Designed for groups, experienced as individuals Does not imply homogeneity Multimembership Attention
    33. 35. Tool polarities: F2F and Wikis From John D. Smith http://www.learningalliances.net Synchronous Asynchronous Rhythm Participation Reification Interactions Group Individual Identities
    34. 36. Conversation: Your Big Questions, then break time!
    35. 37. Orientations
    36. 38. Digital Habitats Orientation Spidergram Activity From: Digital Habitats: stewarding technology for communities Etienne Wenger, Nancy White & John. D. Smith, 2009 http:// www.technologyforcommunities.com http://www.flickr.com/photos/viamoi/3221971368/
    37. 39. … meetings … relationships … community cultivation … access to expertise … projects … context … individual participation … content publishing … open-ended conversation Community activities oriented to … Base material from: Digital Habitats: Stewarding technology for communities © 2009 Wenger, White, and Smith
    38. 40. <ul><li>Meetings – in person or online gatherings with an agenda (i.e. monthly topic calls) </li></ul><ul><li>Projects – interrelated tasks with specific outcomes or products (i.e. Identifying a new practice and refining it.) </li></ul><ul><li>Access to expertise – learning from experienced practitioners (i.e. access to subject matter experts) </li></ul><ul><li>Relationship – getting to know each other (i.e. the annual potluck dinner!) </li></ul><ul><li>Context – private, internally-focused or serving an organization, or the wider world (i.e. what is kept within the community, what is shared with the wider world) </li></ul><ul><li>Community cultivation – Recruiting, orienting and supporting members, growing the community (i.e. who made sure you’re the new person was invited in and met others?) </li></ul><ul><li>Individual participation – enabling members to craft their own experience of the community (i.e. access material when and how you want it.) </li></ul><ul><li>Content – a focus on capturing and publishing what the community learns and knows (i.e. a newsletter, publishing an article, etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>Open ended conversation – conversations that continue to rise and fall over time without a specific goal (i.e. listserv or web forum, Twitter, etc.) </li></ul>Base material from: Digital Habitats: Stewarding technology for communities © 2009 Wenger, White, and Smith Orientations What do they mean?
    39. 41. activities oriented to … Example: The Birdwatchers of Central Park … open-ended conversation … meetings … projects … access to expertise … relationships … context … community cultivation … individual participation … content publishing Weekly bird walks, winter bird feeding fillings, irregular celebrations and events… Advocacy drives, adopt parts of the park, bird counts… The participation of the “Big Guns,” and “Regulars.” Mostly F2F Note when people missing… Invite people in Internal and External focus: Publishing, the “Register,” available to media… While everyone pays attention to the community, no centralized efforts… Anyone can bird watch, but sharing what you see/know is important…so the community accommodates both The “Register” (print) is central to community… Bump into another bird-watcher? Have a conversation… Base material from: Digital Habitats: Stewarding technology for communities, © 2009 Wenger, White, and Smith
    40. 42. activities oriented to … Community Name: KM4Dev global knowledge sharing network … open-ended conversation … meetings … projects … access to expertise … relationships … context … community cultivation … individual participation … content publishing Base material from: Digital Habitats: Stewarding technology for communities © 2009 Wenger, White, and Smith With only one meeting a year, large size and diversity, KM4Dev focuses on enabling individual participation. Community knowledge wiki, content management system to bring together resources. Email list is core of community activity Once a year and only about 10% do/can participate. When funding allows. E.G. supporting ShareFair Informally via the email list by asking/answering questions. Relationships mostly via meetings and core group. Strongly external – all resources public/shared. While everyone pays attention to the community, no centralized efforts…
    41. 43. activities oriented to … Birdwatchers and KM4Dev-ers … open-ended conversation … meetings … projects … access to expertise … relationships … context … community cultivation … individual participation … content publishing Base material from: Digital Habitats: Stewarding technology for communities © 2009 Wenger, White, and Smith
    42. 44. What can we do with this? <ul><li>Identify where your community/group/team is now to assess for design, facilitation and technology stewardship. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Refocus activities to increase engagement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify tools and processes to support current activities </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Identify where your group wants to go as a planning tool. </li></ul><ul><li>Look backwards and forwards as a reflection tool. </li></ul>Base material from: Digital Habitats: Stewarding technology for communities © 2009 Wenger, White, and Smith
    43. 45. activities oriented to … Community Name: … open-ended conversation … meetings … projects … access to expertise … relationships … context … community cultivation … individual participation … content publishing Base material from: Digital Habitats: Stewarding technology for communities © 2009 Wenger, White, and Smith Put a mark on the arrow to indicate how important a particular orientation is to your community. The more important the orientation, the further out on the arrow the dot should be placed. Then draw a line between the dots. See the next example.
    44. 46. <ul><li>Meetings – Web meeting tools for online, shared calendars and wikis for planning, wikis, blogs, images/audio/video to capture and share during and after. </li></ul><ul><li>Projects – Email lists/forums to coordinate, shared calendars, project management trackers, blogs to journal/report. </li></ul><ul><li>Access to expertise – Online profiles, social networking sites, “yellow pages,” discussion forums, blogs. </li></ul><ul><li>Relationship – Twitter/IM to share small frequent messages, member directories, Skype/VoIp for conversation. </li></ul><ul><li>Context – Public, open websites for outward facing. Password protected for inward facing groups. </li></ul><ul><li>Community cultivation – Outward facing web sites to attract members, Twitter/IM to feel connected, Skype for voice. </li></ul><ul><li>Individual participation – RSS/aggregators, tagging, so people can craft what content they get, customizable settings on web tools, using synch and asynch </li></ul><ul><li>Content – content management systems, blogs, wikis, podcasts, social bookmarking, tags, video/audio, images, mindmapping. </li></ul><ul><li>Open ended conversation – email lists, forums, Twitter, chat. </li></ul>Base material from: Digital Habitats: Stewarding technology for communities © 2009 Wenger, White, and Smith Orientations Picking tools? How?
    45. 47. Building a CASE Together… <ul><li>Group form: small, pairs, or full group? </li></ul><ul><li>Visibility: Public or private? </li></ul><ul><li>Style: Format? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Editable? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Commentable? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Images? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What else? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Portability: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Export? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Republish? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Aggregate? </li></ul></ul>
    46. 48. http://www.flickr.com/photos/lynetter/421323707/in/set-72057594139269787 /
    47. 49. http://www.flickr.com/photos/angelrays/354572601/
    48. 50. http://www.technologyforcommunity.com http://www.fullcirc.com/weblog/onfacblog.htm Tag: technologystewardship http://www.flickr.com/photos/cgommel/138167164/
    49. 51. Epilogue Slides: will be posted on slideshare.net (choconancy) Other stuff: http://onlinefacilitation.wikispaces.com/ http://onlinefacilitation.wikispaces.com/OZ+Technology+Stewardship+Workshops Contact Nancy White nancyw at fullcirc dot com http://www.fullcirc.com
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