Introduction To Designing Online Community Nov09

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Miscellaneous slides from my Introduction to Online Communities workshops in Australia, 2009. Note that these represent raw material rather than a sequence of ideas.

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  • As we dug into the PRACTICES of technology stewardship, we realized they were part of a system, a habitat in which a group, community or network interacted. That there were intersections between the defined set of tools in a group and those used by individuals. There were overlaps and disconnects.
  • We have sought to find new labels for these ways of “being together.” What has been significant for me is that they express a continuum of being together.
  • You can be clear when we talk about the individual, me. We can be clear when we have bounded communities with clear establishment of in/out membership. We can also have communities with fuzzy boundaries, which may even be networks.
  • You can be clear when we talk about the individual, me. We can be clear when we have bounded communities with clear establishment of in/out membership. We can also have communities with fuzzy boundaries, which may even be networks.
  • You can be clear when we talk about the individual, me. We can be clear when we have bounded communities with clear establishment of in/out membership. We can also have communities with fuzzy boundaries, which may even be networks.
  • So in the past, I’ve done this exercise in pairs, in World Café and in the 1-2-4 build up. I’d not do 1-2-4 here and Café takes longer, so I suggest pairs or maybe rotating pairs then a debrief.
  • We didn’t get to the network mapping
  •           The time/space dimension is represented on the horizontal axis, with primarily asynchronous tools toward the left and primarily synchronous tools toward the right.             The donut of the middle band represents the tension between participation and reification by classifying tools along a continuum between interacting in the upper half and publishing in the lower half.             The tension between the group and the individual is represented by the center circle and the outer band respectively. The center circle focuses on the collective, with group and site management tools. The outer band focuses on the individual, with tools for managing participation from the perspective of individual members.
  • Get used to it Control is an ILLUSION
  • In our research of CoPs we noticed 9 general patterns of activities that characterized a community’s orientation. Most had a mix, but some were more prominent in every case. Image: Wenger, White and Smith, 2007
  • In our research of CoPs we noticed 9 general patterns of activities that characterized a community’s orientation. Most had a mix, but some were more prominent in every case. I’ll walk us through each profile and give some examples. Image: Wenger, White and Smith, 2007
  • We can use the activity circle as the basis for a spider graph and evaluate the groups we are working with. I’ll give a few examples. We can use this spidergraph to inform both our process and our technology designs in a learning setting.
  • Things look different in different types of communities. This is a support community.
  • Sliders – as we think about how we pick, design and deploy technology, what sort of intentionality do we want with respect to these tensions? More importantly, how do we use them as ways to track our community’s health, make adjustments in both technology and practice.
  • Not clearly demarcated, but there are new roles and practices we are all taking on. http://www.flickr.com/photos/dsevilla/189528500/in/set-1368427/ Uploaded on July 14, 2006 by dsevilla
  • Introduction To Designing Online Community Nov09

    1. 1. Designing for online communities: thinking about social and technical design Nancy White/Full Circle Associates Matt Moore/Innotecture
    2. 2. Human spectrogram
    3. 3. Tech + Social: Technology has fundamentally changed how we can be together
    4. 4. http://technologyforcommunities.com/
    5. 5. what is online community anyway? <ul><li>Our baseline definition(s) </li></ul>
    6. 6. Labels!!! Learning Communities Knowledge Networks Communities of Practice Online Communities Knowledge Networks
    7. 7. Communities of Practice <ul><li>A group of people... </li></ul><ul><li>Who share challenges, passions or interest </li></ul><ul><li>Interact regularly </li></ul><ul><li>Who learn with and from each other </li></ul><ul><li>Improve their ability to do what they care about ---- Etienne Wenger </li></ul>
    8. 8. <ul><li>individual  group  community  network </li></ul>
    9. 9. Many: Networks We: Communities Me: the Individual Personal identity, interest & trajectory Bounded membership; group identity, shared interest Boundaryless; fuzzy, intersecting interests
    10. 10. http://www.flickr.com/photos/dnorman/436670816/
    11. 11. Many: Networks We: Communities Me: the Individual Individual learning, personal learning environments … Classes, informal learning cohorts, conferences, clubs… Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Wikipedia, etc…
    12. 12. Many: Networks We: Communities Me: the Individual Personal identity, interest & trajectory Bounded membership; group identity, shared interest Boundaryless; fuzzy, intersecting interests
    13. 13. <ul><li>social design  purpose, people and processes </li></ul>
    14. 14. <ul><li>technical design  tools and infrastructure </li></ul>
    15. 15. social design: purpose <ul><li>gain > pain </li></ul><ul><li>who’s purpose? </li></ul><ul><li>orientations </li></ul>
    16. 16. purpose exercise <ul><li>What is the purpose of your community/group? </li></ul><ul><li>Community Checklist </li></ul>
    17. 17. our purpose strengths <ul><li>(we’ll fill this in as the pairs report out…) </li></ul>
    18. 18. our purpose challenges <ul><li>(we’ll fill this in as the pairs report out…) </li></ul>
    19. 19. revise? <ul><li>After hearing other people’s ideas, do you want to alter yours at all? </li></ul><ul><li>Share any changes at your table - briefly </li></ul>
    20. 20. social design: people attitude learning style motivation Experience - technology learning
    21. 21. network maps <ul><li>sticky notes </li></ul><ul><li>big paper </li></ul><ul><li>pens </li></ul><ul><li>see Eva Schiffer’s NetMap process http:// netmap.wordpress.com </li></ul>
    22. 23. social design: process online facilitation community management roles norms, rules, agreements role modeling But we'll come back to this...
    23. 24. <ul><li>technical design  tools and infrastructure </li></ul>
    24. 25. technical stewardship <ul><li>access </li></ul>tool selection Implementation/ configuration practices
    25. 26. addressing inherent community tensions Tools Group asynchronous discussion boards teleconference chat instant messaging member directory wiki blog telephony/ VoIP individual profile page e-mail e-mail lists scratch pad RSS “ new” indicators subscription podcast content repository presence indicator buddy list security Q&A systems RSS aggregator newsletter calendar videoconference application sharing whiteboard site index participation statistics search subgroups personalization community public page version control document management UseNet content rating scheduling polling commenting networking tools tagging bookmarking shared filtering geomapping www.TechnologyForCommunities.com Etienne Wenger Nancy White John Smith Individual Interacting Publishing synchronous Group asynchronous
    26. 27. which tools? <ul><li>minimum, elegant configuration </li></ul><ul><li>where you do/don’t have choice </li></ul><ul><li>straddling tools – the reality today </li></ul>
    27. 28. process design <ul><li>driven by purpose </li></ul><ul><li>shaped by technology </li></ul><ul><li>effected by people </li></ul>scaffolds/paths technical experimentation facilitation
    28. 29. roles exercise <ul><li>Design a job description for a community leader/facilitator/manager (decide) for either an internal or external community </li></ul><ul><li>For each line of the description, begin to think about a story or scenario that embodies that job requirement. </li></ul>
    29. 30. sharing it out <ul><li>Have a dramatic title for each story </li></ul><ul><li>Make it real </li></ul><ul><li>Listen for key ideas as others tell their story </li></ul>
    30. 31. 15% solution <ul><li>Noticing and using the influence, discretion and power individuals have right now. </li></ul><ul><li> – Keith McCandless </li></ul>
    31. 32. don’t worry – there will be bumps in the road…TALK about them
    32. 33. and… <ul><li>Other issues: monitoring and evaluation, more on technology… </li></ul><ul><li>Where to learn more? With whom? </li></ul><ul><li>Where to practice? </li></ul>
    33. 34. Resources <ul><li>Online Community Checklist </li></ul><ul><li>http://onlinefacilitation.wikispaces.com/Online+Community+Planning+Checklist </li></ul><ul><li>http://onlinefacilitation.wikispaces.com/OZ+Online+Community+Workshops </li></ul><ul><li>Nancy’s Blog </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.fullcirc.com </li></ul><ul><li>Matt’s Blog </li></ul><ul><li>http://innotecture.wordpress.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>Nancy’s Wiki </li></ul><ul><li>http://onlinefacilitation.wikispaces.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>Nancyw at fullcirc dot com </li></ul><ul><li>Matt’s at innotecture at gmail dot com </li></ul>
    34. 35. … meetings … relationships … community cultivation … access to expertise … projects … context … individual participation … content publishing … open-ended conversation Community activities oriented to … Base material from: Digital Habitats: Stewarding technology for communities © 2009 Wenger, White, and Smith
    35. 36. activities oriented to … … meetings … context … community cultivation … access to expertise … projects … open-ended conversation … content publishing … individual participation … relationships © 2007 Wenger, White, and Smith Purpose:
    36. 37. Community activities oriented to … … meetings … context … community cultivation … access to expertise … projects … open-ended conversation … content publishing … individual participation … relationships © 2007 Wenger, White, and Smith No image skills Existing relationships Basis for evaluation - motivated Diverse skills/ motivation New to web meetings
    37. 38. … meetings … access to expertise … context … community cultivation … projects … open-ended conversation … content publishing … individual participation … relationships © 2006 Wenger, White, and Smith Community activities oriented to … course
    38. 39. support community … meetings … access to expertise … context … community cultivation … projects … open-ended conversation … content publishing … individual participation … relationships © 2006 Wenger, White, and Smith Community activities oriented to …
    39. 40. Togetherness Separateness Interacting Publishing Individual Group
    40. 41. http://www.flickr.com/photos/dsevilla/189528500/in/set-1368427/ Emerging roles and practices…

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