Digital Habitats for Webheads in Action Online 09
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Technology has changed what it means for people to "Be Together." We'll explore a tool to help look at how your learning community chooses to be together. The tool can be used to map activities to ...

Technology has changed what it means for people to "Be Together." We'll explore a tool to help look at how your learning community chooses to be together. The tool can be used to map activities to possible technologies, to assess the current status of a community or used to imaging the community's trajectory going forward.

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  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
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  • very interesting.......you can promote this presentation on soEZLecturing.com with your recorded voice....
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  • In our research of CoPs we noticed 9 general patterns of activities that characterized a community’s orientation. Most had a mix, but some were more prominent in every case.
    Image: Wenger, White and Smith, 2007
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  • This activity comes out of a chapter in our book that looks at the activity orientations of communities of practice and how this might drive both the technology stewardship and the overall community nurturing and leadership activities. In this context, we are using it to explore the application of social media to a particular goal you might have.
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  • A bit more explanation can be found here http://www.fullcirc.com/wp/2009/05/21/webheads-in-action-online-unconvergence/, and the audio from the presentation here http://webheadsinaction.org/node/359
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  • Photo credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/dani3l3/364684710/
  • These roles and practices create the conditions that enable people to….
  • This activity comes out of a chapter in our book that looks at the activity orientations of communities of practice and how this might drive both the technology stewardship and the overall community nurturing and leadership activities. In this context, we are using it to explore the application of social media to a particular goal you might have.
  • In our research of CoPs we noticed 9 general patterns of activities that characterized a community’s orientation. Most had a mix, but some were more prominent in every case. Image: Wenger, White and Smith, 2007
  • Before you do the Spidergram exercise, read through the orientations and think of some examples from a number of contexts. I’ll offer two examples as well in subsequent slides.
  • Here is an example drawn from the book “Red-Tails in Love: Pale Male’s Story -- A True Wildlife Drama in Central Park” by Marie Winn. Vintage Books, 2005 The book tells of a community of bird watchers in Central Park and exquisitely describes their practices. This is a predominantly face to face group that might use some social media, but not as their central way of interacting. They are a large, diverse group, but tightly geographically bound to Central Park in New York City. They might fill this spidergram differently than I might, but this is just an example!Image: Wenger, White and Smith, 2007
  • KM4Dev (http://www.km4dev.org) is a global network of practitioners interested in knowledge management and knowledge sharing in international development. Over 800 members are subscribed to the email list which had it’s origins in July 2000. It is both a well established but loosely bounded network that interacts primarily online, with once a year meetings that a small subset attend.
  • What was interesting was that these orientations had implications beyond communities. They could be a useful analysis, diagnostic and measurement tool for the application of social media to an organization’s work.
  • You can see how different groups have different priorities. It is a bit like a community activity “finger print.” The next step is to think about what tools support the different orientations.
  • Here are some examples of social media tools that support the orientations. Keep in mind that while a tool may have been designed for a specific purpose, people regularly and imaginatively use them in different ways.
  • A tech steward may be called upon to make sense of all the offerings of the market, scanning and selecting for her community. They start paying attention to working with the tensions between the individual and the group, synch and asynch group, interacting and publishing. Image credit: Wenger, White and Smith
  • Sliders – as we think about how we pick, design and deploy technology, what sort of intentionality do we want with respect to these tensions? More importantly, how do we use them as ways to track our community’s health, make adjustments in both technology and practice.
  • What would your Spidergram look like? Think of a specific group or project that you want to explore. What activities do you need to support? Which are more important than others? Put a mark on the arrow to indicate how important a particular orientation is to your community. The more important the orientation, the further out on the arrow the dot should be placed. Then draw a line between the dots. Clarification: For context, towards the middle means a more inward (private) orientation and towards the outer edge a more public/open orientation.Discuss the spidergram with your group or community. Do they see it differently? Adjust your image to get the fullest view possible. Then, and only then, start thinking about tools. Always start with WHAT you want to do before the HOW!
  • Here is a blank template for you. You can do it in PowerPoint or print it off, do it by hand then scan or take a digital image to share back online with the rest of the group. Put a mark on the arrow to indicate how important a particular orientation is to your community. The more important the orientation, the further out on the arrow the dot should be placed. Then draw a line between the dots. See the next example.
  • Here are some examples of social media tools that support the orientations. Keep in mind that while a tool may have been designed for a specific purpose, people regularly and imaginatively use them in different ways.

Digital Habitats for Webheads in Action Online 09 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Digital Habitats Making sense of the technology landscape for groups & communities Nancy White Full Circle Associates For WIAO09 May 22, 2009
  • 2. Tech + Social: Technology has fundamentally changed how we can be together
  • 3. ? http://www.flickr.com/photos/martin_heigan/1470060584/sizes/o/
  • 4. What the %&*# is a technology steward to do? Nancy White Full Circle Associates http://www.flickr.com/photos/dani3l3/364684710/
  • 5. enable people to… • discover & appropriate useful technology • be in and use communities & networks (people) • express their identity • find and create content • usefully participate
  • 6. Digital Habitats Orientation Spidergram Activity From: Digital Habitats: stewarding technology for communities Etienne Wenger, Nancy White & John. D. Smith, 2009 http://www.technologyforcommunities.com http://www.flickr.com/photos/viamoi/3221971368/
  • 7. … meetings … open-ended … projects conversation … content … access to publishing Community expertise activities oriented to … … individual … relationships participation … community cultivation … context Base material from: Digital Habitats: Stewarding technology for communities © 2009 Wenger, White, and Smith
  • 8. Orientations What do they mean? • Meetings – in person or online • Community cultivation – Recruiting, gatherings with an agenda (i.e. orienting and supporting members, monthly topic calls) growing the community (i.e. who made • Projects – interrelated tasks with sure you’re the new person was invited specific outcomes or products (i.e. in and met others?) Identifying a new practice and refining • Individual participation – enabling it.) members to craft their own experience • Access to expertise – learning from of the community (i.e. access material experienced practitioners (i.e. access when and how you want it.) to subject matter experts) • Content – a focus on capturing and • Relationship – getting to know each publishing what the community learns other (i.e. the annual potluck dinner!) and knows (i.e. a newsletter, publishing an article, etc.) • Context – private, internally-focused or serving an organization, or the wider • Open ended conversation – world (i.e. what is kept within the conversations that continue to rise and community, what is shared with the fall over time without a specific goal wider world) (i.e. listserv or web forum, Twitter, etc.) Base material from: Digital Habitats: Stewarding technology for communities © 2009 Wenger, White, and Smith
  • 9. Weekly bird walks, winter Example: The Birdwatchers … meetings bird feeding fillings, irregular of Central Park celebrations and events… Bump into another … open-ended bird-watcher? Have conversation … projects a conversation… Advocacy drives, adopt parts of the park, bird counts… The “Register” (print) is central to community… … content … access to publishing expertise activities oriented to … The participation of the “Big Guns,” and Anyone can bird watch, but “Regulars.” Mostly F2F sharing what you see/know is important…so the community accommodates both Note when people missing… Invite people in … individual participation Internal and External focus: Publishing, … relationships the “Register,” While everyone pays … community available to media… … context attention to the community, no centralized efforts… cultivation Base material from: Digital Habitats: Stewarding technology for communities, © 2009 Wenger, White, and Smith
  • 10. Community Name: KM4Dev Once a year and only global knowledge sharing network … meetings about 10% do/can participate. Email list is core of … open-ended community activity conversation … projects When funding allows. Community knowledge wiki, E.G. supporting ShareFair content management system to bring together resources. … content … access to publishing expertise activities oriented to … Informally via the email With only one meeting a list by asking/answering year, large size and questions. diversity, KM4Dev focuses on enabling individual participation. Relationships mostly via meetings and core … individual Strongly group. participation external – all … relationships resources public/shared. While everyone pays Base material from: … community attention to the … context Digital Habitats: Stewarding technology for community, no cultivation communities © 2009 Wenger, White, and Smith centralized efforts…
  • 11. What can we do with this? • Identify where your community/group/team is now to assess for design, facilitation and technology stewardship. – Refocus activities to increase engagement – Identify tools and processes to support current activities • Identify where your group wants to go as a planning tool. • Look backwards and forwards as a reflection tool. Base material from: Digital Habitats: Stewarding technology for communities © 2009 Wenger, White, and Smith
  • 12. Birdwatchers and KM4Dev-ers … meetings … open-ended conversation … projects … content … access to publishing expertise activities oriented to … … relationships … individual participation Base material from: … community Digital Habitats: Stewarding technology for cultivation … context communities © 2009 Wenger, White, and Smith
  • 13. Orientations What tools? How? • Meetings – Web meeting tools for • Community cultivation – Outward online, shared calendars and wikis for facing web sites to attract members, planning, wikis, blogs, Twitter/IM to feel connected, Skype for images/audio/video to capture and voice. share during and after. • Individual participation – • Projects – Email lists/forums to RSS/aggregators, tagging, so people coordinate, shared calendars, project can craft what content they get, management trackers, blogs to journal/ customizable settings on web tools, report. using synch and asynch • Access to expertise – Online profiles, • Content – content management social networking sites, “yellow pages,” systems, blogs, wikis, podcasts, social discussion forums, blogs. bookmarking, tags, video/audio, • Relationship – Twitter/IM to share images, mindmapping. small frequent messages, member • Open ended conversation – email directories, Skype/VoIp for lists, forums, Twitter, chat. conversation. • Context – Public, open websites for outward facing. Password protected for inward facing groups. Base material from: Digital Habitats: Stewarding technology for communities © 2009 Wenger, White, and Smith
  • 14. addressing inherent personalization community tensions “new” indicators Interacting Q&A telephony/ VoIP Individual e-mail systems teleconference e-mail lists UseNet videoconference polling instant discussion messaging subscription boards networking security chat tools subgroups asynchronous participation presence synchronous buddy list commenting statistics Group indicator RSS application blog wiki sharing RSS geomapping whiteboard aggregator site index scheduling shared calendar tagging filtering newsletter member bookmarking directory community podcast public page document management interest content scratch filter rating content version pad repository control Publishing search individual profile page 2007 Etienne Wenger, Nancy White and John Smith
  • 15. Togetherness Separateness Interacting Publishing Individual Group
  • 16. Community Name: … meetings … open-ended conversation … projects Put a mark on the arrow to indicate … content … access to how important a particular publishing expertise orientation is to your community. activities The more important the orientation, oriented to … the further out on the arrow the dot should be placed. Then draw a line between the dots. See the next example. … individual participation … relationships Base material from: … community Digital Habitats: Stewarding technology for cultivation … context communities © 2009 Wenger, White, and Smith
  • 17. Community Name: … meetings … open-ended conversation … projects … content … access to publishing expertise activities oriented to … … individual participation … relationships Base material from: … community Digital Habitats: Stewarding technology for cultivation … context communities © 2009 Wenger, White, and Smith
  • 18. Orientations Questions? Observations? • Meetings – • Community cultivation – • Projects – • Individual participation – • Access to expertise – • Content – • Relationship – • Open ended conversation – • Context – Base material from: Digital Habitats: Stewarding technology for communities © 2009 Wenger, White, and Smith
  • 19. More? Nancyw@fullcirc.com http://www.fullcirc.com http://www.technologyforcommunities.com http://wiaoc09.pbworks.com/ Image: cc http://www.flickr.com/photos/viamoi/3221971368/