Digital Habitats Community Orientation Spidergram Activity

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Some images you can use to do the Community Orientations spidergram activity from the book, "Digital Habitats: stewarding technology for communities" (forthcoming, 2009, Wenger, White and Smith).

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  • This activity comes out of a chapter in our book that looks at the activity orientations of communities of practice and how this might drive both the technology stewardship and the overall community nurturing and leadership activities.
  • Digital Habitats Community Orientation Spidergram Activity

    1. 1. Digital Habitats Community Orientation Spidergram Activity From: Digital Habitats: stewarding technology for communities Etienne Wenger, Nancy White & John. D. Smith 2009 http://www.technologyforcommunities.com This activity comes out of a chapter in our book that looks at the activity orientations of communities of practice and how this might drive both the technology stewardship and the overall community nurturing and leadership activities. Base material from: Digital Habitats: Stewarding technology for communities © 2009 Wenger, White, and Smith
    2. 2. … meetings … relationships … community cultivation … access to expertise … projects … context … individual participation … content publishing … open-ended conversation Community activities oriented to … Base material from: Digital Habitats: Stewarding technology for communities © 2009 Wenger, White, and Smith
    3. 3. <ul><li>Meetings – in person or online gatherings with an agenda (i.e. monthly topic calls) </li></ul><ul><li>Projects – interrelated tasks with specific outcomes or products (i.e. Identifying a new practice and refining it.) </li></ul><ul><li>Access to expertise – learning from experienced practitioners (i.e. access to subject matter experts) </li></ul><ul><li>Relationship – getting to know each other (i.e. the annual potluck dinner!) </li></ul><ul><li>Context – private, internally-focused or serving an organization, or the wider world (i.e. what is kept within the community, what is shared with the wider world) </li></ul><ul><li>Community cultivation – Recruiting, orienting and supporting members, growing the community (i.e. who made sure you’re the new person was invited in and met others?) </li></ul><ul><li>Individual participation – enabling members to craft their own experience of the community (i.e. access material when and how you want it.) </li></ul><ul><li>Content – a focus on capturing and publishing what the community learns and knows (i.e. a newsletter, publishing an article, etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>Open ended conversation – conversations that continue to rise and fall over time without a specific goal (i.e. listserv or web forum, Twitter, etc.) </li></ul>Community Orientations what do they mean? Base material from: Digital Habitats: Stewarding technology for communities © 2009 Wenger, White, and Smith
    4. 4. What can we do with this? <ul><li>Identify where your community is now to assess for community facilitation and technology stewardship. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Refocus activities to increase engagement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify tools and processes to support activities </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Identify where your community wants to go as a planning tool. </li></ul><ul><li>Look backwards and forwards as a reflection tool. </li></ul>Base material from: Digital Habitats: Stewarding technology for communities © 2009 Wenger, White, and Smith
    5. 5. activities oriented to … Community Name: … open-ended conversation … meetings … projects … access to expertise … relationships … context … community cultivation … individual participation … content publishing Base material from: Digital Habitats: Stewarding technology for communities © 2009 Wenger, White, and Smith Put a mark on the arrow to indicate how important a particular orientation is to your community. The more important the orientation, the further out on the arrow the dot should be placed. Then draw a line between the dots. See the next example.
    6. 6. activities oriented to … Example: The Birdwatchers Of Central Park … open-ended conversation … meetings … projects … access to expertise … relationships … context … community cultivation … individual participation … content publishing Weekly bird walks, winter bird feeding fillings, irregular celebrations and events… Advocacy drives, adopt parts of the park, bird counts… The participation of the “Big Guns,” and “Regulars.” Note when people missing… Internal and External: Publishing, the “Register,” available to media… While everyone pays attention to the community, no centralized efforts… Anyone can birdwatch, but sharing what you see/know is important… The “Register” is central to community… Bump into another bird-watcher? Have a conversation… Base material from: Digital Habitats: Stewarding technology for communities, © 2009 Wenger, White, and Smith
    7. 7. activities oriented to … Community Name: … open-ended conversation … meetings … projects … access to expertise … relationships … context … community cultivation … individual participation … content publishing Base material from: Digital Habitats: Stewarding technology for communities © 2009 Wenger, White, and Smith

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