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South sudan polio slideshow
 

South sudan polio slideshow

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    South sudan polio slideshow South sudan polio slideshow Presentation Transcript

    • In December 2011, South Sudan celebrated five months of independence fromSudan – achieved on 9 July 2011. But scars left by a decades-long civil war arestill evident: widespread chronic food insecurity; acute malnutrition, exceeding20 per cent in certain areas; severely limited access to basic services, includinghealth care, improved sources of drinking water and sanitation facilities; andhigh rates of under-five and maternal mortality. Immunization coverage alsoremains low.More than two years have passed since the last case of polio was reported inwhat is now South Sudan. But the country’s proximity to the DemocraticRepublic of the Congo and Chad – both of which have suffered from importedwild poliovirus for over a year – leaves South Sudanese children at continuedrisk of the disease.United Nations organizations, including UNICEF and the World HealthOrganization (WHO), together with other partners, are supporting theGovernment’s efforts to keep the country polio-free. In 2011, over 3 millionunder-five children were vaccinated against polio in each of four immunizationcampaigns.
    • Michael Goo, Manager of theExpanded Programme onImmunization (EPI) in Unity State,holds three vials of oral polio vaccine,in the state’s vaccine storage facility, inthe town of Bentiu. Storage facilitiesplay a critical role in preserving the‘cold chain’, the series of temperaturecontrols required to maintain vaccinepotency from manufacture throughinoculation. The EPI was created in1974 by WHO, working with UNICEF,governments and other partners, toensure that children in all countriesbenefit from vaccines. Image UNI122537: © UNICEF/NYHQ2011-2450/Sokol
    • A worker carries insulated shippingcontainers, filled with polio vaccines,to a truck bound for the airport, in theUnity State vaccine storage facility, inthe town of Bentiu. The vaccines willthen be transported to remotelocations via airplane. Insulatedshipping containers and vaccinestorage facilities play a critical role inpreserving the ‘cold chain’, the seriesof temperature controls required tomaintain vaccine potency frommanufacture through inoculation. Image UNI122538: © UNICEF/NYHQ2011-2451/Sokol
    • Workers unload insulated shippingcontainers, filled with polio vaccines,from a cargo plane, at Aweil Airport, inthe town of Aweil, Northern Bahr elGhazal State. Several hours before, thevaccines were transferred from avaccine storage facility, in Juba, thecapital. Insulated shipping containersand vaccine storage facilities play acritical role in preserving the ‘coldchain’, the series of temperaturecontrols required to maintain vaccinepotency from manufacture throughinoculation. Image UNI122540: © UNICEF/NYHQ2011-2452/Sokol
    • Children watch workers unloadinsulated shipping containers, filledwith polio vaccines, from a cargoplane, at the Aweil Airport, inNorthern Bahr el Ghazal State. Severalhours before, the vaccines weretransferred from a vaccine storagefacility, in Juba, the capital. Insulatedshipping containers and vaccinestorage facilities play a critical role inpreserving the ‘cold chain’, the seriesof temperature controls required tomaintain vaccine potency frommanufacture through inoculation. Image UNI122541: © UNICEF/NYHQ2011-2453/Sokol
    • Carrying a cold box filled with poliovaccines, vaccinator Nyaluak Tebuom,14, passes other travellers on a dirtroad as he journeys to Pakur Village, inUnity State. Nyaluak must walk morethan 10 kilometres on the road, whichis laden with anti-tank mines, toadminister the vaccines to the village’schildren. Cold boxes play a critical rolein preserving the ‘cold chain’, theseries of temperature controlsrequired to maintain vaccine potencyfrom manufacture throughinoculation. Image UNI122542: © UNICEF/NYHQ2011-2454/Sokol
    • (Foreground) traditional dancers, whoare serving as social mobilizers for theMinistry of Health and UNICEF, wavefrom the back of a pickup truck, inJuba, the capital. They are raisingawareness of the importance ofimmunizing children against polio. Aprocession of people on ‘boda-bodas’(bicycle taxis) follows them. Image UNI122543: © UNICEF/NYHQ2011-2455/Sokol
    • A procession of people on ‘boda-bodas’ (bicycle taxis) rides on a dirtroad, in Juba, the capital. Precedingthem, traditional dancers, serving associal mobilizers for the Ministry ofHealth and UNICEF, wave from theback of a pickup truck; they are raisingawareness of the importance ofimmunizing children against polio. Image UNI122544: © UNICEF/NYHQ2011-2456/Sokol
    • Traditional dancers, who are serving associal mobilizers for the Ministry ofHealth and UNICEF, perform forcommunity members, in Juba, thecapital. They are raising awareness ofthe importance of immunizing childrenagainst polio. Image UNI122545: © UNICEF/NYHQ2011-2457/Sokol
    • (Second from right) Chief Chirilo MayikMadut speaks with vaccinators ontheir arrival at the Chilak ReturneeCentre, in the town ofRubkona, Rubkona County, Unity State.One of the vaccinators is carrying acold box filled with polio vaccines. Coldboxes play a critical role in preservingthe ‘cold chain’, the series oftemperature controls required tomaintain vaccine potency frommanufacture through inoculation. Thecentre – run by the Government withsupport from UNICEF and otherpartners – provides basicservices, including water, health careand nutritional aid, to returnees whofled during the civil war. Image UNI122546: © UNICEF/NYHQ2011-2458/Sokol
    • (Left-right) Social mobilizer Dor Gawarand vaccinator Nyakuoth Chuol, 15,speak with Aluk Chol, holding her 2-year-old son, Mayol Deng, outside herhome, in the Chilak Returnee Centre,in the town of Rubkona, Unity State.Nyakuoth is carrying a cold box filledwith polio vaccines. Cold boxes play acritical role in preserving the ‘coldchain’, the series of temperaturecontrols required to maintain vaccinepotency from manufacture throughinoculation. The centre – run by theGovernment with support fromUNICEF and other partners – providesbasic services, including water, healthcare and nutritional aid, to returneeswho fled during the civil war. Image UNI122547: © UNICEF/NYHQ2011-2459/Sokol
    • One-month-old Monyaguek Mayen isheld by his mother while receiving adose of oral polio vaccine, in the ChilakReturnee Centre, in the town ofRubkona, Unity State. Children needmultiple rounds of the vaccine toensure immunity. The centre – run bythe Government with support fromUNICEF and other partners – providesbasic services, including water, healthcare and nutritional aid, to returneeswho fled during the civil war. Image UNI122548: © UNICEF/NYHQ2011-2460/Sokol
    • Vaccinator Nyakuoth Chuol, 15,administers a dose of oral poliovaccine to Malakal Bolinth, held by hismother, Apol Maror, inside their home,in the Chilak Returnee Centre, in thetown of Rubkona, Unity State. Childrenneed multiple rounds of the vaccine toensure immunity. The centre – run bythe Government with support fromUNICEF and other partners – providesbasic services, including water, healthcare and nutritional aid, to returneeswho fled during the civil war. Image UNI122549: © UNICEF/NYHQ2011-2461/Sokol
    • A vaccinator records the number ofchildren who have been immunizedagainst polio by a vaccination team, inJuba, the capital. Each team isassigned to visit approximately 100households. Image UNI122551: © UNICEF/NYHQ2011-2463/Sokol