Costumes of earlier time to present time

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COSTUMES FROM ANCIENT TIME TO PRESENT TIMES. INCLUDES COSTUMES WORN FROM PREHISTORIC LIFE TO PRESENT WORLD.

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Costumes of earlier time to present time

  1. 1. BY- CHITWAN NAGPAL DEPTT. OF FASHION DESIGN
  2. 2. THE ANCIENT WORLD •PREHISTORIC LIFE •MESOPOTAMIA EARLY CULTURES ACROSS THE WORLD •ASIAN CULTURE EUROPE( FROM RENAISSANCE TO MODERN ERA •15TH CENTURY •16TH CENTURY •17TH CENTURY •18TH CENTURY •19TH CENTURY MODERN WORLD (1900 TO PRESENT) •1900 TO 2010s (present scenario)
  3. 3. I. THE ANCIENT WORLD PRE HISTORIC LIFE Modern man which is known as HOMO SAPIENS evolved from many species about 5 lakh years ago. NEANDERTHAL MAN , an early subspecies of homo sapiens in human evolution survived from 200,000 yrs ago to 30,000 years ago.. They developed in several areas of world and began to use more tools to hunt, to build shelters and develop the FIRST FORMS OF HUMAN CLOTHING. Overlapping with NEANDERTHAL man was the subspecies from which modern man directly descended HOMO SAPIENS better known as CRO MAGNON MAN. CRO-MAGNON MAN was much like neanderthal man in his creation of rough forms of clothing. They developed arrows , axes , tools etc and lived in a climate that was much colder than present climate and so needed ways to keep warm and dry. ANIMAL SKINS Was the 1st form of clothing and cro magnon man used tools such as rock and bone scrapers to strip the flesh and cut skins into primitive forms of clothing.  First civilized human settlements developed in MESOPOTAMIA centered in present day IRAQ
  4. 4. AT SOME point neanderthals learned how to use thick, furry hides from these animals to keep themselves warm and dry . With this discovery CLOTHING WAS BORN. They used thin strips of animal hide to tie the furs about themselves in a way that BELTS Are used today.  They developed earliest forms of body covering. TUNIC- FIRST ASSEMBLED PIECE OF CLOTHING Made from two rectangular pieces Of animal hide bound together on one short side with a hole left for HEAD. Tunic was ancestor of shirt. NEEDLE- ONE OF THE MOST IMP. INVENTION MADE of slivers of animal bone which were sharpened at one end and had an eye at other end.
  5. 5. CRO MAGNON MAN developed CLOSE FITTING PANTS ,SHIRTS ,SHAWLS ,HOODS, LONG BOOTS ICEMEN(austria) – Thin leather loin cloth covered around genitals,sewn leggings, long sleeve fur coat extended till knees closed with belt sometimes, HIDE boots stuffed with grass,cap of thick fur Iceman with his body coverings.
  6. 6. SHOES MADE OF HIDES OF DEER OR SHEEP. IN NORTH AMERICA PRESENCE OF NATURAL PLANT FIBERS ALLOWED PEOPLE TO WEAVE MORE BETTER FITTING SHOES WHICH ARE A PREDECESSOR TO MODERN SANDALS.
  7. 7. Mesopotamia ,a large region centered between Tigris and Euphrates river in MODERN DAY IRAQ,laid the foundation for customs that would dominate later EUROPEAN culture. The SUMERIANS created the earliest civilization in Mesopotamia . 3000 B.C AKKADINS Took power around 2350B.C BABYLONIANS rose to power in 1894 B.C ASSYRIANS 1380B.C-612.BC PERSIANS 550B.C 330B.C CLOTHING
  8. 8. MEN wore WAIST STRINGS OR LOIN CLOTH. LATER WRAPAROUND SKIRT WAS INTRODUCED WHICH HUNG TILL KNEE AND WAS HELD BY THICK ROUNDED BELT TIED AT BACK. SHAWLS WERE WORN AND WERE DECORATED WITH SIMPLE BORDER OR ALLOVER PATTERNS . SUMERIAN WOMEN WORE SEWN OUTFITS WITH TIERS OF FRINGES.. SHAWLS OR TOPS WERE ALSO FRINGED WORN BY MEN. AT THE END OF SUMERIAN RULE BOTH MEN AND WOMEN WORE SKIRTS AND SHAWLS.
  9. 9. Elaborate hairstyles soon became important for both men and women in Mesopotamia. Men started to grow their hair longer and would wear it in waves. The king began to wear a full beard and long braided hair tied in a large bun at the nape of his neck. Women continued to wear their hair long, twisting it into large buns that covered the top of the head to the base of the neck and adorning it with ribbons and pins. Sculpture showing a man wearing typical Mesopotamian turban
  10. 10. ■ Sandals While the men living in the Sumerian (3000–2000 B.C.E.), the Akkadian (2350–2218 B.C.E.), and the Babylonian (1894–1595 B.C.E.) empires of Mesopotamia, the region between the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers in present-day Iraq, went barefoot all the time, Assyrian men began to wear sandals for everyday use around 911 B.C.E. The evidence suggests that all men went barefoot while worshipping and some men continued to go barefoot all the time. Some, however, began to wear protective sandals for everyday use, especially those living in the more mountainous areas, and some wore boots
  11. 11. The Asian societies that began in modern-day China are among the oldest known human societies on earth. In the last century, however, with the modernization of the ancient nations of China and Japan, people in the West have come to know a great deal about early Asian cultures. Evidence of human settlement in China dates back nearly 600,000 years. In about 1875 B.C.E. a powerful empire known as Xia began the first Chinese dynasty , the name for a long period of rule by several generations of a family. detailed knowledge of Chinese history begins with the dynasty that followed: the Shang dynasty (c. 1550–c. 1050B.C.E.). Though China began as a small empire centered on the Great Bend of the Yellow River, it expanded over time to become quite a vast kingdom. Under the Zhou, the empire expanded even more and the Chinese came into conflict with other non-Chinese peoples who they called“BARBARIANS.” The Chinese felt that their culture and clothing was far superior to that of barbarians. Japan is an island nation that lies to the northeast of China. it was not until settlers from China and Korea traveled to Japan in the sixth century C.E. that a definable society TOOK ROOT. Early Japanese society was deeply rooted in Chinese customs and traditions of religion, governance, and costume. Each king surrounded himself with warriors known as samurai. The samurai had a distinct warrior culture of their own, with rules of behavior and dress. The culture had a great influence on fashion in Japan.
  12. 12. CHINA Chinese people wore Mao suits, the simply cut, dull-colored outfits favored by the Communist Party. Beginning with the earliest Xia dynasty (1875–1550 B.C.E.), we can see some of the basic forms of Chinese dress. The majority of the people wore a simple outfit consisting of a tunic or jacket called a SAN and a pair of loose trousers called a KU. The customary garment of the upper classes in ancient China , was the ROBE, • a long-sleeved, • loose-fitting garment that fastened in the front. The exact cut and style of these robes changed significantly over the course of Chinese history. At times the sleeves were narrow; at other times quite loose and billowing. •Sometimes the robes were belted, while at other times they hung loose about the waist. •These robes were fastened either down the middle or across the right side of the chest, but never across the left. •Made of SILK •By the time of the Qing dynasty (1644–1911 C.E.), the highly ornamented DRAGON ROBE had become the signature garment of the ruling class.
  13. 13. SAN –TUNIC OR JACKET KU- TROUSER MAO SUIT WITH MANDARIN COLLAR DRAGON ROBE
  14. 14.  A composite of many animals, including a snake, an eagle, a tiger, and a devil, the dragon symbolized the natural world and transformation.  It was associated with Chinese emperors from at least the first century. It was a long robe, reaching to the ankles, with long sleeves and a circular opening for the neck. A large front panel on the wearer’s left side of the garment was wrapped and fastened at the right side, in the traditional Chinese style. The key element on a dragon robe was, of course, the dragon. Most dragon robes had one large dragon in the center of the garment, with smaller dragons on the sleeves and lower down the hem. The robes were made of rich silk, sometimes in several layers or with silk padding to add warmth. Occasionally the robes would include embroidery at the neck fastening or the cuffs.
  15. 15. Two Chinese women wearing patterned cheongsams, which are considered the national dress of Hong Kong. •The cheongsam (CHONG-sahm) is the dress that most westerners associate with China. • It is a long, close-fitting dress with short sleeves, a slit up one side, a mandarin collar (a round, stand-up collar that is worn close to the neck), and a fastening across the right side of the upper chest. • The cheongsam first appeared shortly after the collapse of the Qing dynasty in 1911, which had ruled China since 1644 • Women especially began to have more freedom and wanted to modernize their clothing to allow more freedom of movement and comfort. But they didn’t want to just adopt Western dress. The cheongsam represented a compromise. •It used traditional Chinese fabrics like silk. However, when the Communist Party took control of mainland China in 1949, the cheongsam quickly went out of STYLE.
  16. 16. Japan borrowed many Chinese customs, including rule by emperors, growing rice, the Buddhist religion, and many clothing traditions,  Including the wearing of robes for the wealthy and trousers and simple tunics for the poor. During the Heian period (794–1185 C.E.), however, the Japanese began to create distinct versions of clothing. While poorer classes continued to wear fairly simple clothing, including loose trousers and a simple linen shirt for men and a loose skirt for women, members of the upper classes and nobility began to develop very distinct clothing traditions. The basic Japanese garments were the kosode, a short-sleeved shirt that opened in front, and the hakama, or long trousers. The kosode eventually evolved into the garment most associated with Japan, the kimono. The kimono, whose name means “thing to wear,” is the Japanese equivalent of the Chinese robe and is worn by both men and women. It is a long garment tied at the waist with an obi, or sash. The kimono has many variations according to the circumstance in which it is worn. Many other garments form part of the traditional Japanese dress, such as the haori, the ho, the kataginu, and the kinu.
  17. 17. Japanese women march in a parade, wearing blue
  18. 18. Kataginu are men’s vests with broad, wing-like shoulders, worn with hakama, or trousers, to form a kamishimo, or complementary outfit. The hakama are worn in a contrasting color or fabric from the kataginu. •Kimono refers to the principal outer garment of Japanese dress, a long robe with wide sleeves, made of various materials and in many patterns. •Though Western dress is now the norm in contemporary Japan, the kimono is still worn on special occasions. •Although the modern kimono is generally a T-shaped robe , there are a variety of subtle variations for different wearers and different occasions.
  19. 19. Japanese hairstyles often relied on pins, combs, and other Forms of fasteners to keep hair in place. This geisha, or female entertainer, wears a bright red obi at her waist and plays the drum. A woman wearing traditional Platform shoes.
  20. 20. For over a thousand years, tiny feet were symbols of feminine beauty, elegance, and sexuality in China. In order to achieve the goal of tiny three-inch “lotus feet” (the lotus was a kind of flower), most young Chinese girls had their feet bound tightly with strips of cloth to prevent growth. Once the process was completed, the deformed feet were placed into beautiful, embroidered lotus shoes, tiny pointed slippers that were made especially for bound feet. Foot binding began when a girl was between three and seven years old and was usually done by her mother. The four smaller toes were bent back, and often broken, to rest against the sole of the foot. A strip of cloth, about ten feet long and two inches wide, was wrapped around the foot tightly, forcing it to become both narrower and shorter. As the foot became shorter, the heel and toes were pulled closer together, making the foot into a curved arc. After two years of constantly tighter binding, the foot was the perfect size: three to LOTUS SHOES FOOT BINDING
  21. 21. A Renaissance of learning and culture Beginning in the late fourteenth century and escalating in the fifteenth century, two regions began to lead a rebirth, called the Renaissance, of learning, culture, and commerce. This Renaissance began in Italy, especially around the city of Florence. Europeans in the fifteenth century typically wore clothing rich in colors and fabrics
  22. 22. MIDDLE AGES ■ Hose and breeches, which cover the legs individually, become more common garments for men. FOURTEENTH CENTURY TO SIXTEENTH CENTURY ■ Cuts and openings in garments made from slashing and dagging decorate garments from upper body coverings to shoes. FIFTEENTH CENTURY AND SIXTEENTH CENTURY ■ The doublet— a slightly padded short overshirt, usually buttoned down the front, with or without sleeves—becomes an essential men’s garment. LATE FIFTEENTH THROUGH THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY ■ The ruff, a wide pleated collar, often stiffened with starch or wire, is worn by wealthy men and women of the time. SIXTEENTH CENTURY ■ Worn underneath clothing, corsets squeeze and mold women’s bodies into the correct shape to fit changing fashions of dress. The dramatic gigot sleeve was first seen on women’s dresses in the sixteenth century.
  23. 23. SEVENTEENTH CENTURY ■ The Kuba people, living in the present-day nation of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, weave a decorative cloth called Kuba cloth. An entire social group of men and women is involved in the production of the cloth, from gathering the fibers, weaving the cloth, and dyeing the decorative strands, to applying the embroidery, appliqué, or patchwork. SEVENTEENTH CENTURY ■ Canes become carefully crafted items and are carried by most well-dressed gentleman. EIGHTEENTH CENTURY ■ The French Revolution (1789–99) destroys the French monarchy and makes ankle-length trousers fashionable attire for all men. Trousers come to symbolize the ideas of the Revolution, an effort to make French people more equal, and soon men of all classes are wearing long trousers. 1870 ■ A French hairstylist named Marcel Grateau invents the first long-lasting hair waving technique using a heated iron to give hair curls that lasts for days. LATE 1800s TO EARLY 1900s ■ The feathered war bonnet, traditional to only a small number of Native American tribes, becomes known as a typical Native American headdress with the help of Buffalo Bill Cody’s Wild West Show, which features theatrical representations of the Indians and cowboys of the American West and travels throughout America and parts of Europe.
  24. 24. 1900s ■ Loose, floppy, two-legged undergarments for women, bloomers start a trend toward less restrictive clothing for women, including clothing that allows them to ride bicycles, play tennis, and to take part in other sport activities 1920s ■ The navy blue blazer, a jacket with brass buttons, becomes popular for men to wear at sporting events. 1920s ■ A fad among women for wearing short, bobbed hairstyles sweeps America and Europe. 1930s ■ Popular as a shirt for tennis, golf, and other sport activities for decades, the polo shirt becomes the most popular leisure shirt for men. 1939 ■ For the first time, Vogue, the respected fashion magazine,pictures women in trousers. 1946 ■ The bikini, a two-piece bathing suit, is developed and named after a group of coral islands in the Pacific Ocean. 1950s ■ The gray flannel suit becomes the most common outfit worn by men working at desk jobs in office buildings. 1980s ■ Power dressing becomes a trend toward wearing expensive, designer clothing for work. 1990s ■ Grunge, a trend for wearing old, sometimes stained or ripped clothing, becomes a fashion sensation and prompts designers to sell simple flannel shirts for prices in excess of one thousand dollars.
  25. 25. 2000s ■ Versions of clothing available during the 1960s and 1970s, such as bell-bottom jeans and the peasant look, return to fashion as “retro fashions.” 1960s – GO GO BOOTS Shorter the skirt taller the boots. Punks of 1970s with spike hair into MOHAWKS.
  26. 26. Hippies often adorned their long hair with flowers and headwraps.( 1961-79) Modern version of a wrap dress, which wraps in the front and features built-in string ties tied around the waist. (1970s) Worn by legions of hippies, tie and dye is perhaps the most enduring symbol of the 1960s.
  27. 27. The peasant look, with its long, flowing garments decorated with embroidery or floral patterns, was extremely popular throughout the 1960s and 1970s and made a comeback in the late 1990s. PANTSUITS(1960s) BY DESIGNERS LIKE YVES SAINT LAURENT

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