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28th  Sunday  A Mass Readings
28th  Sunday  A Mass Readings
28th  Sunday  A Mass Readings
28th  Sunday  A Mass Readings
28th  Sunday  A Mass Readings
28th  Sunday  A Mass Readings
28th  Sunday  A Mass Readings
28th  Sunday  A Mass Readings
28th  Sunday  A Mass Readings
28th  Sunday  A Mass Readings
28th  Sunday  A Mass Readings
28th  Sunday  A Mass Readings
28th  Sunday  A Mass Readings
28th  Sunday  A Mass Readings
28th  Sunday  A Mass Readings
28th  Sunday  A Mass Readings
28th  Sunday  A Mass Readings
28th  Sunday  A Mass Readings
28th  Sunday  A Mass Readings
28th  Sunday  A Mass Readings
28th  Sunday  A Mass Readings
28th  Sunday  A Mass Readings
28th  Sunday  A Mass Readings
28th  Sunday  A Mass Readings
28th  Sunday  A Mass Readings
28th  Sunday  A Mass Readings
28th  Sunday  A Mass Readings
28th  Sunday  A Mass Readings
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28th Sunday A Mass Readings

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Reflections by Fr Cielo Almazan OFM

Reflections by Fr Cielo Almazan OFM

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  • 1. Welcome to our Bible Study 28 th Sunday in Ordinary Time October 9, 2011 Indigenous Peoples Sunday In preparation for this Sunday’s Liturgy In aid of focusing our homilies and sharing Prepared by Fr. Cielo R. Almazan, OFM
  • 2. First Reading: Isaiah 25,6-10a <ul><li>6 On this mountain the LORD of hosts will provide for all peoples a feast of rich food and choice wines, juicy, rich food and pure, choice wines. </li></ul><ul><li>7 On this mountain he will destroy the veil that veils all peoples, the web that is woven over all nations; 8 he will destroy death forever. The Lord GOD will wipe away the tears from all faces. The reproach of his people he will remove from the whole earth; for the LORD has spoken. 9 On that day it will be said: &quot;Behold our God, to whom we looked to save us! This is the LORD for whom we looked; let us rejoice and be glad that he has saved us!&quot; 10 For the hand of the LORD will rest on this mountain . </li></ul>The focus is on the mountain (Mt. Zion) .
  • 3. First Reading : Isaiah 25,6-10a <ul><li>6 On this mountain the LORD of hosts will provide for all peoples a feast of rich food and choice wines , juicy, rich food and pure, choice wines . </li></ul><ul><li>7 On this mountain he will destroy the veil that veils all peoples, the web that is woven over all nations; 8 he will destroy death forever. The Lord GOD will wipe away the tears from all faces. The reproach of his people he will remove from the whole earth; for the LORD has spoken. 9 On that day it will be said: &quot;Behold our God, to whom we looked to save us! This is the LORD for whom we looked; let us rejoice and be glad that he has saved us!&quot; 10 For the hand of the LORD will rest on this mountain. </li></ul><ul><li>Commentary </li></ul><ul><li>In v.6, the mountain refers to Mt. Zion. </li></ul><ul><li>It is the locus of God’s saving power. </li></ul><ul><li>God promises to treat, with a feast, all the peoples, not only the Israelites. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The feast consists of rich, healthy food and best wines. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>V.7 repeats the expression “on this mountain.” It emphasizes the importance of the place. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>This time God promises to remove what keeps the people enslaved and divided. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>V.8 continues to speak of God’s promises: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>To wipe away sadness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To remove what causes them shame. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>V.9, predicts that the peoples will be grateful to God. </li></ul><ul><li>V.10 gives the reason why. God will be present in this place. </li></ul>
  • 4. Reflections on the first reading <ul><li>God is a loving God. </li></ul><ul><li>He does not discriminate against anyone. </li></ul><ul><li>He shows his love to all the peoples, not only to the Israelites. </li></ul><ul><li>He throws them a feast. He treats them with good food. </li></ul><ul><li>God uses Mt. Zion as the locus of showing his power to his people. </li></ul><ul><li>The mountain is a symbol of God’s presence. It is the place where God acts for his people and where the people recognize his gift of salvation. </li></ul>
  • 5. Further reflections <ul><li>To experience God’s presence in our lives, we must climb his mountain. We must exert effort to approach him at the appointed times. </li></ul><ul><li>Though we believe that God is everywhere, the mountain is a special place for encounter with God. </li></ul><ul><li>On Mt. Sinai, Yahweh gave his commandments and covenanted with his people. Elijah sought refuge on Mt. Horeb, when Queen Jezebel tried to kill him, and there God came quietly to console him and give him another assignment. </li></ul><ul><li>Jesus was transfigured on Mt. Tabor. </li></ul><ul><li>Jesus died on Mt. Calvary for our sins. </li></ul>
  • 6. <ul><li>What do we consider as the mountain in our lives? Where do we go to find satisfaction? Where do we go to remove the veil and the web that paralyze us? Where do we go to wipe our tears away? Where do we go to say our sincere thanks and praise to God? </li></ul><ul><li>That mountain may not always be a private place without distractions. It may be a place where people congregate and together they listen to the message of a prophet or a teacher, like the mountain in Jerusalem itself. </li></ul>
  • 7. Resp. Ps 23:1-3a, 3b-4, 5, 6 <ul><li>R. (6cd) I shall live in the house of the Lord all the days of my life. </li></ul><ul><li>1 The LORD is my shepherd; I shall not want. 2 In verdant pastures he gives me repose; beside restful waters he leads me; 3a he refreshes my soul. </li></ul><ul><li>3b He guides me in right paths for his name's sake. 4 Even though I walk in the dark valley I fear no evil; for you are at my side with your rod and your staff that give me courage. </li></ul><ul><li>5 You spread the table before me in the sight of my foes; you anoint my head with oil; my cup overflows. </li></ul><ul><li>6 Only goodness and kindness follow me all the days of my life; and I shall dwell in the house of the LORD for years to come. </li></ul>
  • 8. Resp. Ps 23:1-3a, 3b-4, 5, 6 <ul><li>R. (6cd) I shall live in the house of the Lord all the days of my life. </li></ul><ul><li>1 The LORD is my shepherd; I shall not want. 2 In verdant pastures he gives me repose; beside restful waters he leads me; 3a he refreshes my soul. </li></ul><ul><li>3b He guides me in right paths for his name's sake. 4 Even though I walk in the dark valley I fear no evil; for you are at my side with your rod and your staff that give me courage. </li></ul><ul><li>5 You spread the table before me in the sight of my foes; you anoint my head with oil; my cup overflows. </li></ul><ul><li>6 Only goodness and kindness follow me all the days of my life; and I shall dwell in the house of the LORD for years to come. </li></ul><ul><li>Commentary </li></ul><ul><li>Ps 23 is one of the most beautiful psalms, and the psalm most frequently used. </li></ul><ul><li>Here, God is seen as a shepherd / good provider / good guide. </li></ul><ul><li>As a shepherd, God gives </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Repose, rest (vv.1-2) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Refreshment, guide, protection, courage (vv.3-4) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Recognition in the midst of opposition (v.5) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Joy and contentment, secure life (v.6) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The psalm is a product of a person, who has experienced the goodness of God. </li></ul>
  • 9. Reflections on the Psalm <ul><li>The poem can be idyllic, but it demonstrates the concrete kindness and goodness of God. </li></ul><ul><li>God is a caring God. </li></ul><ul><li>He is after our total well-being. </li></ul><ul><li>Can you write a psalm that looks like it? </li></ul><ul><li>You can, if you have pleasant experiences with God. </li></ul>
  • 10. Second Reading: Philippians 4,12-14 <ul><li>12 I know indeed how to live in humble circumstances; I know also how to live with abundance . In every circumstance and in all things I have learned the secret of being well fed and of going hungry, of living in abundance and of being in need. 13 I have the strength for everything through him who empowers me. 14 Still, it was kind of you to share in my distress. </li></ul>The focus is on experience of need and abundance.
  • 11. Second Reading: Philippians 4,12-14 <ul><li>12 I know indeed how to live in humble circumstances; I know also how to live with abundance . In every circumstance and in all things I have learned the secret of being well fed and of going hungry, of living in abundance and of being in need. 13 I have the strength for everything through him who empowers me. 14 Still, it was kind of you to share in my distress. </li></ul><ul><li>Commentary </li></ul><ul><li>St. Paul shares with us his life experiences in v.12. </li></ul><ul><li>He has learned how to live well in contrasting situations: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>In humble circumstances and in abundance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In being well-fed and in hunger </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In times of famine and in times of feast. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>In v.13, Paul attributes to Jesus his ability to cope. </li></ul><ul><li>In v.14, Paul is appreciative of the Philippians, who share in his sufferings (distress). </li></ul>
  • 12. Reflections on the second reading <ul><li>Like St. Paul, in prison at this time (in Ephesus), we should not take offense of our deprivation. </li></ul><ul><li>If we have deep spirituality (connected to Christ, with strong prayer life), we will have the strength to cope with more privations. </li></ul><ul><li>When we are down, remember that our loved ones feel the same way too. They are in solidarity with us. Let us thank them like St. Paul. </li></ul>
  • 13. Gospel Reading: Matthew 22,1-14 <ul><li>Jesus again in reply spoke to them in parables, saying, 2 &quot;The kingdom of heaven may be likened to a king who gave a wedding feast for his son. 3 He dispatched his servants to summon the invited guests to the feast , but they refused to come. 4 A second time he sent other servants, saying, 'Tell those invited: &quot;Behold, I have prepared my banquet, my calves and fattened cattle are killed, and everything is ready; come to the feast .&quot;' 5 Some ignored the invitation and went away, one to his farm, another to his business. 6 The rest laid hold of his servants, mistreated them, and killed them. 7 The king was enraged and sent his troops, destroyed those murderers, and burned their city. 8 Then he said to his servants, 'The feast is ready, but those who were invited were not worthy to come. 9 Go out, therefore, into the main roads and invite to the feast whomever you find.' 10 The servants went out into the streets and gathered all they found, bad and good alike, and the hall was filled with guests. </li></ul>
  • 14. <ul><li>11 But when the king came in to meet the guests he saw a man there not dressed in a wedding garment. 12 He said to him, 'My friend, how is it that you came in here without a wedding garment?' But he was reduced to silence. 13 Then the king said to his attendants, 'Bind his hands and feet, and cast him into the darkness outside, where there will be wailing and grinding of teeth.' 14 Many are invited, but few are chosen.&quot; </li></ul>
  • 15. Gospel Reading: Matthew 22,1-14 <ul><li>Parable of the Wedding Banquet </li></ul><ul><li>Jesus again in reply spoke to them in parables, saying, 2 &quot;The kingdom of heaven may be likened to a king who gave a wedding feast for his son. </li></ul><ul><li>1 st summon of invited guests </li></ul><ul><li>3 He dispatched his servants to summon the invited guests to the feast , but they refused to come. </li></ul><ul><li>2 nd summon of invited guests </li></ul><ul><li>4 A second time he sent other servants, saying, 'Tell those invited: &quot;Behold, I have prepared my banquet, my calves and fattened cattle are killed, and everything is ready; come to the feast .&quot;' 5 Some ignored the invitation and went away, one to his farm, another to his business. 6 The rest laid hold of his servants, mistreated them, and killed them. </li></ul><ul><li>The King’s Judgment </li></ul><ul><li>7 The king was enraged and sent his troops, destroyed those murderers, and burned their city. </li></ul>A simple outline!
  • 16. <ul><li>Unworthy guests </li></ul><ul><li>8 Then he said to his servants, 'The feast is ready, but those who were invited were not worthy to come. </li></ul><ul><li>3 rd summon </li></ul><ul><li>9 Go out, therefore, into the main roads and invite to the feast whomever you find.' 10 The servants went out into the streets and gathered all they found, bad and good alike, and the hall was filled with guests. </li></ul><ul><li>Unworthy guest </li></ul><ul><li>11 But when the king came in to meet the guests he saw a man there not dressed in a wedding garment. 12 He said to him, 'My friend, how is it that you came in here without a wedding garment?' But he was reduced to silence. 13 Then the king said to his attendants, 'Bind his hands and feet, and cast him into the darkness outside, where there will be wailing and grinding of teeth.' 14 Many are invited, but few are chosen.&quot; </li></ul>
  • 17. Commentary on the gospel <ul><li>There are two parables fused into one. </li></ul><ul><li>Both come under the title, “The Parable of the Wedding Banquet/Feast” </li></ul><ul><li>The first parable (vv. 1-10) focuses on the refusal of those who were invited to come. </li></ul><ul><li>The second parable (11-14) focuses on those who showed up but were not prepared for the occasion. </li></ul><ul><li>On both parables, we may ask: how come that the king who invites is so insistent and then he becomes violent and destructive? Why does he not just respect the feelings of others? He should not force anyone to attend the wedding. </li></ul><ul><li>There are three kinds of responses from those invited: </li></ul><ul><li>Some simply refuse to come. </li></ul><ul><li>Others have alibis: work in the farm, engage in business </li></ul><ul><li>Still others become violent. </li></ul>
  • 18. Reflections on the gospel reading <ul><li>God invites us to attend his banquet. </li></ul><ul><li>We should not refuse his invitation. We should make it our priority. </li></ul><ul><li>The wedding banquet symbolizes God’s initiative to draw us to himself. In those days, weddings were the best occasions to forge ties between two parties, not only the bride and the groom, but their families as well. During weddings, all other activities are suspended. </li></ul><ul><li>This wedding is not an ordinary occasion; it is a royal wedding. Everybody should be interested in it and not take it for granted. One should feel honored if invited. </li></ul>
  • 19. <ul><li>Worldly concerns (individual work and personal interests) hinder us from being keen in attending to God’s concerns. </li></ul><ul><li>In responding, we should do it properly. It is not enough to be present. One must be prepared and presentable (in a wedding garment). </li></ul><ul><li>We do not trivialize God’s invitation. We should show respect to the host, as well as, exhibit self-respect, by dressing up. </li></ul>
  • 20. Tying the 3 readings and the Psalm <ul><li>The common theme is food and feast. </li></ul><ul><li>The LORD of hosts will provide for all peoples a feast of rich food and choice wines. (1 st reading) </li></ul><ul><li>God is a good shepherd, who feeds his flock. </li></ul><ul><li>“ I have learned the secret of being well fed, living in abundance.” ( 2 nd reading) </li></ul><ul><li>“ Everything is ready; come to the feast. ” (Gospel reading). Be ready too. </li></ul>
  • 21. How to develop your homily / sharing <ul><li>We need food to live. </li></ul><ul><li>We enjoy eating our food if we eat together with our friends and loved ones. </li></ul><ul><li>Meals have a social dimension. </li></ul><ul><li>During meals, we are expected to be respectful and sensitive to the needs of others. </li></ul><ul><li>We are taught not to argue during meals, not to lose appetite. </li></ul>
  • 22. <ul><li>The readings for today talk about meals. </li></ul><ul><li>In the gospel , God serves not just an ordinary meal but a banquet. </li></ul><ul><li>He invites us to partake in his banquet of love. </li></ul><ul><li>We should not fail to oblige. </li></ul><ul><li>It is a great honor to be invited, more so, if we respond positively. </li></ul>
  • 23. <ul><li>In the first reading , God offers a sumptuous meal to his people. </li></ul><ul><li>God serves nutritious food and best wine in the mountain. </li></ul><ul><li>Not only that, God will eliminate all the elements that hinder people from coming together. </li></ul><ul><li>God does not like anyone to be isolated from the others. </li></ul><ul><li>It is his will that we enjoy our meals together. </li></ul>
  • 24. <ul><li>In the second reading , Paul shares with the Philippians his personal experiences, both in want and in abundance. </li></ul><ul><li>In times of abundance, he exercises moderation. He does not abuse his appetite. He is in control. </li></ul><ul><li>In times of want, he does not demand what is not there. He adjusts. </li></ul><ul><li>He attributes his ability to adjust to Christ. </li></ul><ul><li>Paul is physically and spiritually happy. </li></ul><ul><li>He experiences joy in all circumstances. </li></ul>
  • 25. <ul><li>It is unbecoming of a Christian to eat by himself, when it is possible to eat with others. </li></ul><ul><li>Good food, with conversation, helps build friendship and relationships. </li></ul><ul><li>When invited to a party, we must dress up properly for the occasion to honor the host. </li></ul><ul><li>Let each ordinary meal be an agape . </li></ul>
  • 26. <ul><li>The eucharist is a banquet of love. </li></ul><ul><li>Here, Jesus gives himself totally in the form of bread and wine. </li></ul><ul><li>Through the eucharist , he wants to satisfy our hunger for God. </li></ul><ul><li>There is no other and better way to be in communion with God than through the eucharist received in a disposed manner. </li></ul>
  • 27. Our Context of Sin and Grace <ul><li>Alibis </li></ul><ul><li>Inability to relate </li></ul><ul><li>Gate crashers </li></ul><ul><li>Unkempt </li></ul><ul><li>Always eating </li></ul><ul><li>Voracious eater </li></ul><ul><li>Greed </li></ul><ul><li>Junk foods </li></ul><ul><li>Kill joy </li></ul><ul><li>Fraternal gatherings </li></ul><ul><li>Agape </li></ul><ul><li>Social grace </li></ul><ul><li>Neat </li></ul><ul><li>Wedding banquets </li></ul><ul><li>Anniversaries </li></ul><ul><li>Birthday celebrations </li></ul><ul><li>Common recreations </li></ul><ul><li>Nice and well executed liturgies </li></ul>The End
  • 28. Suggested Songs <ul><li>The Lord is My Shepherd </li></ul><ul><li>The Wedding Banquet </li></ul><ul><li>The Lord is My Light and My Salvation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http:// www.youtube.com/watch?v =9ekQdpjS4VA </li></ul></ul>

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