Seminar presentation

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Seminar presentation

  1. 1. HISTORYO Indian mathematics emerged in the Indian subcontinent from 1200 BC until the end of the 18th century. In the classical period of Indian mathematics (400 AD to 1200 AD), important contributions were made by scholars like Aryabhata, Brahmagupta, and Bhaskara II. The decimal number system in use today was first recorded in Indian mathematics Indian mathematicians made early contributions to the study of the concept of zero as a number negative numbers arithmetic, and algebra In addition, trigonometry was further advanced in India, and, in particular, the modern definitions of
  2. 2. HISTORYO This period is often known as the golden age of Indian Mathematics. This period saw mathematicians such as Aryabhata, Varahamihira, Brahmagupta, Bhaskara I, Mahavira, and Bhaskara II give broader and clearer shape to many branches of mathematics. Their contributions would spread to Asia, the Middle East, and eventually to Europe. Unlike Vedic mathematics, their works included both astronomical and mathematical contributions.
  3. 3. O AryabhataO VarahamihiraO Brahmagupta
  4. 4. ARYABHATTA
  5. 5. ARYABHATTax + by = c. Here a, b, and c are whole numbers, and we seeking values of x and y in whole numberssatisfying the above equation. For example if a = 5, b =2, and c =8 then x =8 and y = -16 is a solution.
  6. 6. VARAHAMIHIRIO BORN: 505 CEO DIED: 587 CEO Was an astronomer, mathematician & astrological researcher.
  7. 7. VARAHAMIRISome important trigonometric results attributed toVarahamihira
  8. 8. BRAHMAGUPTAO In the 7th century, two separate fields, arithmetic and algebra, began to emerge in Indian mathematics. The two fields would later be called pāṭī-gaṇita and bīja-gaṇita Brahmagupta, in his astronomical work BrāhmaSphuṭaSiddhānta (628 CE), included two chapters (12 and 18) devoted to these fields. Chapter 12, containing 66 Sanskrit verses, was divided into two sections: "basic operations" (including cube roots, fractions, ratio and proportion, and barter) and "practical mathematics" (including mixture, mathematical series, plane figures, stacking bricks, sawing of timber, and piling of grain). In the latter section, he stated his famous theorem on the diagonals of a cyclic quadrilateral.
  9. 9. BRAHMAGUPTASeventh and eighth centuriesBrahmaguptas theorem states that AF = FD.In the 7th century, two separate fields, arithmetic (which included mensuration) and algebra, began toemerge in Indian mathematics. The two fields would later be called pāṭī-gaṇita (literally "mathematicsof algorithms") and bīja-gaṇita (lit. "mathematics of seeds," with
  10. 10. SRINIVAS RAMANUJAN
  11. 11. SRINIVAS RAMANUJANRamanujan is said to have stated on the spot that it was actually avery interesting number mathematically, being the smallest naturalnumber representable in two different ways as a sum of two positivecubes:
  12. 12. HARISH CHANDRA
  13. 13. HARISH CHANDRAO Harish-Chandra (1923- 83) is perhaps the least known Indian mathematician outside of mathematical circles. He began his career as a physicist, working under Dirac. In his thesis, he worked on the representation theory of the group SL2 (C).
  14. 14. FUTUREO It’s in our hand.O If we want future then we can only make the future not anybody else.O AryabhattaO BramaguptaO VarahahmiriO Harish ChandraO Srinivas Ramanujan
  15. 15. FUTUREO

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