• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
36 items to capture for practical hardware asset tracking
 

36 items to capture for practical hardware asset tracking

on

  • 632 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
632
Views on SlideShare
632
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    36 items to capture for practical hardware asset tracking 36 items to capture for practical hardware asset tracking Document Transcript

    • 36  Items  To  Capture  For  PracFcal  Hardware  Asset  Tracking hLp://www.thegeekstuff.com/2008/08/36-­‐items-­‐to-­‐capture-­‐for... Home About Free  eBook Archives Best  of  the  Blog Contact 36  Items  To  Capture  For  Prac3cal  Hardware  Asset  Tracking by  Ramesh  Natarajan  on  August  18,  2008 3 Like 4 Tweet 1 If  you  are  managing  more  than  one  equipment  in  your  organizaFon,  it  is very  important  to  document  and  track  ALL  informaFon  about  the  servers effecFvely.  In  this  arFcle,  I  have  listed  36  aLributes  that  needs  to  be tracked  for  your  equipments,  with  an  explanaFon  on  why  it  needs  to  be tracked.  I  have  also  provided  a  spreadsheet  template  with  these  fields that  will  give  you  a  jumpstart. Before  gePng  into  the  details  of  what  needs  to  be  tracked,  let  us  look  at few  reasons  on  why  you  should  document  ALL  your  equipments. IdenFfying  What  needs  to  be  tracked  is  far  more  important  than How  you  are  tracking  it.  Don’t  get  trapped  into  researching  the best  available  asset  tracking  soTware.  Keep  it  simple  and  use  a  spread  sheet  for  tracking.  Once  you  have  documented everything,  later  you  can  always  find  a  soTware  and  export  this  data  to  it. Sysadmins  hates  to  document  anything.  They  would  rather  spend  Fme  exploring  cool  new  technology  than  documenFng  their current  hardware  and  environment.  But,  a  seasoned  sysadmin  knows  that  spending  Fme  to  document  the  details  about  the equipemnts,  is  going  to  save  lot  of  Fme  in  the  future,  when  there  is  a  problem. Never  assume  anything.  When  it  comes  to  documentaFon,  the  more  details  you  can  add  is  beLer. Don’t  create  document  because  your  boss  is  insisFng  on  it.  Instead,  create  the  document  because  you  truly  believe  it  will  add value  to  you  and  your  team.  If  you  document  without  understanding  or  believing  the  purpose,  you  will  essenFally  leave  out  lot of  criFcal  details,  which  will  eventually  make  the  document  worthless. Once  you’ve  captured  the  aLributes  menFoned  below  for  ALL  your  servers,  switches,  firewalls  and  other  equipments,  you  can use  this  master  list  to  track  any  future  enterprise  wide  implementaFon/changes.  For  e.g.  If  you  are  rolling  out  a  new  backup strategy  through-­‐out  your  enterprise,  add  a  new  column  called  backup  and  mark  it  as  Yes  or  No,  to  track  whether  that  specific acFon  has  been  implemented  on  that  parFcular  equipment. I  have  arranged  the  36  items  into  9  different  groups  and  provided  a  sample  value  next  to  the  field  name  within  parenthesis.  These fields  and  groupings  are  just  guidelines.  If  required,  modify  this  accordingly  to  track  addiFonal  aLributes  specific  to  your  environment. Equipment  Detail (1)  Descrip3on  (ProducFon  CRM  DB  Server)  –  This  field  should  explain  the  purpose  of  this  equipment.    Even  a  non-­‐IT  person should  be  able  to  idenFfy  this  equipment  based  on  this  descripFon.1  of  8 18  Apr  12  7:23  pm
    • 36  Items  To  Capture  For  PracFcal  Hardware  Asset  Tracking hLp://www.thegeekstuff.com/2008/08/36-­‐items-­‐to-­‐capture-­‐for... (2)  Host  Name  (prod-­‐crm-­‐db-­‐srv)  –  The  real  host  name  of  the  equipment  as  defined  at  the  OS  level. (3)  Department  (Sales)  –  Which  department  does  this  equipment  belong  to? (4)  Manufacturer  (DELL)  –  Manufacturer  of  the  equipment. (5)  Model  (PowerEdge  2950)  –  Model  of  the  equipment. (6)  Status  (AcFve)  –  The  current  status  of  the  equipment.  Use  this  field  to  idenFfy  whether  the  equipment  is  in  one  of  the following  state: AcFve  –  Currently  in  use ReFred  –  Old  equipment,  not  gePng  used  anymore Available  –  Old/New  equipment,  ready  and  available  for  usage (7)  Category  (Server)  –  I  primarily  use  this  to  track  the  type  of  equipment.  The  value  in  this  field  could  be  one  of  the  following depending  the  equipment: Server Switch Power  Circuit Router Firewall  etc. Tag/Serial# For  tracking  purpose,  different  vendors  use  different  names  for  the  serial  numbers.  i.e  Serial  Number,  Part  Number,  Asset  Number, Service  Tag,  Express  Code  etc.  For  e.g.  DELL  tracks  their  equipment  using  Service  Tag  and  Express  code.  So,  if  majority  of  the equipments  in  your  organizaFon  are  DELL,  it  make  sense  to  have  separate  columns  for  Service  Tag  and  Express  Code. (8)  Serial  Number (9)  Part  Number (10)  Service  TAG (11)  Express  Code (12)  Company  Asset  TAG  –  Every  organizaFon  may  have  their  own  way  of  tracking  the  system  using  bar  code  or  custom  asset tracking  number.  Use  this  field  to  track  the  equipment  using  the  code  assigned  by  your  company Loca3on (13)  Physical  Loca3on  (Los  Angeles)  –  Use  this  field  to  specify  the  physical  locaFon  of  the  server.  If  you  have  mulFple  data  center in  different  ciFes,  use  the  city  name  to  track  it. (14)  Cage/Room#  –  The  cage  or  room  number  where  this  equipment  is  located. (15)  Rack  #  –  If  there  are  mulFple  racks  inside  your  datacenter,  specify  the  rack  #  where  the  equipment  is  located.  If  your  rack doesn’t  have  any  numbers,  create  your  own  numbering  scheme  for  the  rack. (16)  Rack  Posi3on  –  This  indicates  the  exact  locaFon  of  the  server  within  the  rack.  for  e.g.  the  server  located  at  the  boLom  of the  rack  has  the  rack  posiFon  of  #1  and  the  one  above  is  #2. Network (17)  Private  IP  (192.168.100.1)  –  Specify  the  internal  ip-­‐address  of  the  equipment. (18)  Public  IP  –  Specify  the  external  ip-­‐address  of  the  equipment. (19)  NIC  (GB1,  Slot1/Port1)  -­‐ Tracking  this  informaFon  is  very  helpful,  when  someone  accidentally  pulls  a  cable  from  the  server  (If  this  never  happened  to  you, it  is  only  a  maLer  of  Fme  before  it  happens).  Using  this  field  value,  you  will  know  exactly  where  to  plug-­‐in  the  cable.  If  the  server has  more  than  one  network  connecFon,  specify  all  the  NIC’s  using  a  comma  separated  value.2  of  8 18  Apr  12  7:23  pm
    • 36  Items  To  Capture  For  PracFcal  Hardware  Asset  Tracking hLp://www.thegeekstuff.com/2008/08/36-­‐items-­‐to-­‐capture-­‐for... In  this  example  (GB1,  Slot1/Port1),  the  server  has  two  ethernet  cables  connected.  First  one  connected  to  the  on-­‐board  NIC marked  as  GB1.    Second  one  connected  to  the  Port#1  on  the  NIC  card,  inserted  to  the  PCI  Slot#1. Even  when  the  server  has  only  one  ethernet  cable  connected,  specify  the  port  #  to  which  it  is  connected.  For  e.g.  Most  of  the DELL  servers  comes  with  two  on-­‐board  NIC  labeled  as  GB1  and  GB2.  So,  you  should  know  to  which  NIC  you’ve  connected  your ethernet  cable. (20)  Switch/Port  (Switch1/Port10,  Switch4/Port15)  –  Using  the  NIC  field  above,  you’ve  tracked  the  exact  port  where  one  end  of the  ethernet  cable  is  connected  on  the  server.  Now,  you  should  track  where  the  other  end  of  the  cable  is  connected  to.  In  this example  the  cable  connected  to  the  server  on  the  GB1  is  connected  to  the  Port  10  on  Switch  1.    The  cable  connected  to  the server  on  Port#1of  PCI  Slot#1  is  connected  to  the  Port  15  on  Switch  4. (21)  Nagios  Monitored?  (Yes)  –  Use  this  field  to  indicate  whether  this  equipment  is  gePng  monitored  through  any  monitoring soTware. Storage (22)  SAN/NAS  Connected?  (Yes)  –  Use  this  field  to  track  whether  a  parFcular  server  is  connected  to  an  external  storage. (23)  Total  Drive  Count  (4)  –  This  indicates  the  total  number  of  internal  drives  on  the  server.  This  can  come  very  handy  for capacity  management.  for  e.g.  Some  of  the  dell  servers  comes  only  with  6  slots  for  internal  hard-­‐drives.  In  this  example,  just  by looking  at  the  document,  we  know  that  there  are  4  disk  drives  in  the  servers  and  you  have  room  to  add  2  more  disk  drives. OS  Detail (24)  OS  (Linux)  –  Use  this  field  to  track  the  OS  that  is  running  on  the  equipment.  For  e.g.  Linux,  Windows,  Cisco  IOS  etc. (25)  OS  Version  (Red  Hat  Enterprise  Linux  AS  release  4  (Nahant  Update  5))  –  The  exact  version  of  the  OS. Warranty (26)  Warrenty  Start  Date (27)  Warrenty  End  Date Purchase  &  Lease (28)  Date  of  Purchase  –  If  you  have  purchased  the  equipment,  fill-­‐out  the  date  of  purchase  and  the  price. (29)  Purchase  Price (30)  Lease  Begin  Date  -­‐  If  you  have  leased  the  equipment,  fill-­‐out  all  the  lease  details. (31)  Lease  Expiry  Date (32)  Leasing  Company  –  The  company  who  owns  the  lease  on  this  equipment. (33)  Buy-­‐Out  Op3on  ($1)  –  Is  this  a  dollar-­‐one  buy-­‐out  (or)  Fair  Market  Value  purchase?  This  will  give  you  an  idea  on  whether  to start  planning  for  a  new  equipment  aTer  the  lease  expiry  date  or  to  keep  the  exisFng  equipment. (34)  Monthly  Lease  Payment Addi3onal  Informa3on (35)  URL  –  If  this  is  a  web-­‐server,  give  the  URL  to  access  the  web  applicaFon  running  on  the  system.  If  this  is  a  switch  or  router, specify  the  admin  URL. (36)  Notes  –  Enter  addiFonal  notes  about  the  equipment  that  doesn’t  fit  under  any  of  the  above  fields.  It  may  be  very  tempFng to  add  username  and  password  fields  to  this  spreadsheet.  For  security  reasons,  never  use  this  spreadsheet  to  store  the  root  or administrator  password  of  the  equipment. Asset  Tracking  Excel  Template  1.0  –  This  excel  template  contains  all  the  36  fields  menFoned  above  to  give  you  a  jumpstart  on  tracking equipments  in  your  enterprise.  If  you  convert  this  spread  sheet  to  other  formats  used  by  different  tools,  send  it  to  me  and  I’ll  add  it here  and  give  credit  to  you.  I  hope  you  find  this  arFcle  helpful.  Forward  this  to  appropriate  person  in  your  organizaFon  who  may benefit  from  this  arFcle  by  tracking  the  equipments  effecFvely.    Also,  If  you  think  I’ve  missed  any  aLribute  to  track  in  the  above  list, please  let  me  know. If  you  liked  this  ar1cle,  please  bookmark  it  on  del.icio.us,  Digg  and  Stumble  using  the  link  provided  below  under  ‘What  Next?’  sec1on.3  of  8 18  Apr  12  7:23  pm
    • 36  Items  To  Capture  For  PracFcal  Hardware  Asset  Tracking hLp://www.thegeekstuff.com/2008/08/36-­‐items-­‐to-­‐capture-­‐for... 3 Tweet 1 Like 4  Share  Comment If  you  enjoyed  this  ar3cle,  you  might  also  like.. 1. 50  Linux  Sysadmin  Tutorials Awk  IntroducFon  –  7  Awk  Print  Examples 2. 50  Most  Frequently  Used  Linux  Commands  (With  Examples) Advanced  Sed  SubsFtuFon  Examples 3. Top  25  Best  Linux  Performance  Monitoring  and  Debugging 8  EssenFal  Vim  Editor  NavigaFon  Fundamentals Tools 25  Most  Frequently  Used  Linux  IPTables  Rules 4. Mommy,  I  found  it!  –  15  PracFcal  Linux  Find  Command Examples Examples Turbocharge  PuTTY  with  12  Powerful  Add-­‐Ons 5. Linux  101  Hacks  2nd  EdiFon  eBook   Tags:  DocumentaFon {  8  comments…  read  them  below  or  add  one  } 1  sg  August  19,  2008  at  4:39  am “Sysadmins  hates  to  document  anything.  They  would  rather  spend  Fme  exploring  cool  new  technology  than  documenFng their  current  hardware  and  environment.” —>  why  not  combine  fun  with  necessity?  Ocs  inventory  allows  you  to  play  with  new  open  source  technology  and  in  the process  you  get  a  database  of  everything  that  is  connected  to  the  network  (and  has  the  ocs  inventory  agent  running  on  it), without  having  to  do  it  manually. That  database  can  then  be  queried  (eg  give  me  all  machines  with  less  than  x  mb  ram,  …  )  or  integrated  (e.g.  with  arpwatch: compare  known  hosts  in  inventory  with  hosts  on  the  network,  alert  if  unknown  hosts) If  you  want  to  you  can  also  add  own  properFes  like  warranty  dates  to  the  ocs  inventory  database. 2  Ajith  Edassery  August  21,  2008  at  12:01  am This  is  a  preLy  exhausFve  list.  I  wonder  whether  there  are  not  tracking  tools  (including  inventory,  license  expiry,  floaFng license  usage,  access  tracking,  warranty/service  terms/tenure  etc)  or  soTware  available  for  automaFng  all  these? Anyways,  thanks  for  the  post   Cheers, Ajith4  of  8 18  Apr  12  7:23  pm
    • 36  Items  To  Capture  For  PracFcal  Hardware  Asset  Tracking hLp://www.thegeekstuff.com/2008/08/36-­‐items-­‐to-­‐capture-­‐for... 3  Abhi  August  23,  2008  at  9:10  am Excellent  stuff.  DocumenFng  is  really  good  thing.  But  I  hate  spending  my  Fme  in  documenFng  the  inventory. Rather  I  would  like  to  use  tools  like  OCS  inventory. Do  we  know  any  tool  that  can  be  used  as  non-­‐root  user  to  document  the  system  details  ? 4  Mark  Hoff  August  23,  2008  at  12:49  pm You  wrote:  “Don’t  get  trapped  into  researching  the  best  available  asset  tracking  soTware.”  I  couldn’t  agree  more.  I’ve  seen  the insides  of  many  asset  tracking  systems  (nearly  one-­‐hundred  at  last  count.)  These  include  a  great  many  of  the  large,  medium, and  small  commercial  offerings,  as  well  as  a  range  of  open-­‐source  and  freely-­‐available  packages.  Not  a  single  one  of  them stands  out.  And  most  of  the  Fme  that  you’re  spending  researching,  you  could  be  spending  doing. Asset  tracking  is  a  pain  in  the  *ss.  No  maLer  how  you  do  it,  it’s  dirty,  tedious,  unglamorous  work.  And  it’s  mostly  maintenance work.  No  one  wants  to  do  it.  But  everyone  wants  it  done–and  done  well. 5  Will  Barrowes  September  12,  2008  at  10:19  am I  am  with  CG4  SoluFons  Inc.  We  provide  Asset  Tracking  SoTware  (www.cg4.com)  that  uses  tradiFonal  barcodes,  handheld scanners,  and  a  web-­‐based  central  server  using  a  SQL  database.  I  was  just  reading  through  the  posFngs  and  thought  I  would add  a  couple  of  comments.  Our  customers  spend  most  of  their  Fme  tracking  IT  Assets.  The  list  of  fields  provided  looks comprehensive.  We  see  most  of  those  with  almost  every  customer.  Regardless  of  the  types  of  assets  you  are  tracking,  using  a spreadsheet  is  painful.  My  background  is  corporate  finance  and  when  in  that  role  I  would  use  a  spreadsheet  to  inventory assets.  I  hated  doing  it,  just  like  Mark  Hoff  and  the  others  menFon.  I  would  always  move  that  task  to  the  boLom  of  the  stacks on  my  desk  hoping  it  would  go  away.  For  the  last  eight  years  I  have  been  working  with  CG4  and  I  can  say  that  with  the  strength of  the  mobile  component  of  our  web  based  asset  tracking  soTware  I  would  have  done  my  inventory  work  quickly  and  with  a half  smile  on  my  face  knowing  that  the  painful  inventory  via  spreadsheet  was  no  longer  a  part  of  my  life. Mark  Hoff,  I  would  be  interested  to  have  you  learn  a  bit  about  what  we  offer  and  have  you  give  us  feedback.  With  having  your head  into  so  many  asset  tracking  systems,  I  would  value  your  opinion.  You  can  email  me  at  will.barrowes@cg4.com.  We  might be  able  to  make  it  worth  your  Fme. 6  Jared  Younker  May  26,  2009  at  3:06  pm GreeFngs  Ramesh, Just  wanted  to  thank  you  for  wriFng  the  above  arFcle.  I  was  just  promoted  to  Senior  Network  Administrator  last  week,  and  my first  assigned  task  was  to  create  an  extensively  detailed  company  inventory.  Your  Fps  are  incredibly  helpful,  thanks  for  allowing us  to  learn  from  your  process! 7  Tony  A.A.  December  28,  2010  at  12:23  pm I’ve  been  looking  for  something  like  this  for  a  while  now.  Thank  you! One  thing  that  I  sFll  don’t  know  how  to  track  properly  though,  is  virtual  machines,  physical  machines  running  virtualizaFon, and  how  the  two  are  related.  Using  a  virtualizaFon  cluster  of  several  physical  machines  makes  the  whole  thing  that  much harder. Also  I  oTen  find  it  necessary  to  document  the  main  soTware  or  services  running  on  a  servers,  especially  in  high-­‐availability environment  where  you  have  dedicated  front-­‐end,  database,  and  file  servers. 8  Snozz  March  2,  2011  at  5:31  pm Nice  list,  but  I  suggest  checking  out  Spiceworks.com. Awesome  tool  like  OCS,  but  instead  it  does  everything  client-­‐less.   Leave  a  Comment5  of  8 18  Apr  12  7:23  pm
    • 36  Items  To  Capture  For  PracFcal  Hardware  Asset  Tracking hLp://www.thegeekstuff.com/2008/08/36-­‐items-­‐to-­‐capture-­‐for... Name E-­‐mail Website  NoFfy  me  of  followup  comments  via  e-­‐mail Submit Previous  post:  Get  Quick  Info  On  MySQL  DB,  Table,  Column  and  Index  Using  mysqlshow Next  post:  9  Tips  to  Use  Apachectl  and  HLpd  like  a  Power  User Sign  up  for  our  free  email  newsleLer   you@address.com           Sign Up            RSS    TwiLer    Facebook   Search EBOOKS6  of  8 18  Apr  12  7:23  pm
    • 36  Items  To  Capture  For  PracFcal  Hardware  Asset  Tracking hLp://www.thegeekstuff.com/2008/08/36-­‐items-­‐to-­‐capture-­‐for... POPULAR  POSTS 12  Amazing  and  EssenFal  Linux  Books  To  Enrich  Your  Brain  and  Library 50  UNIX  /  Linux  Sysadmin  Tutorials 50  Most  Frequently  Used  UNIX  /  Linux  Commands  (With  Examples) How  To  Be  ProducFve  and  Get  Things  Done  Using  GTD 30  Things  To  Do  When  you  are  Bored  and  have  a  Computer Linux  Directory  Structure  (File  System  Structure)  Explained  with  Examples Linux  Crontab:  15  Awesome  Cron  Job  Examples Get  a  Grip  on  the  Grep!  –  15  PracFcal  Grep  Command  Examples Unix  LS  Command:  15  PracFcal  Examples 15  Examples  To  Master  Linux  Command  Line  History Top  10  Open  Source  Bug  Tracking  System Vi  and  Vim  Macro  Tutorial:  How  To  Record  and  Play Mommy,  I  found  it!  -­‐-­‐  15  PracFcal  Linux  Find  Command  Examples 15  Awesome  Gmail  Tips  and  Tricks 15  Awesome  Google  Search  Tips  and  Tricks RAID  0,  RAID  1,  RAID  5,  RAID  10  Explained  with  Diagrams Can  You  Top  This?  15  PracFcal  Linux  Top  Command  Examples Top  5  Best  System  Monitoring  Tools Top  5  Best  Linux  OS  DistribuFons How  To  Monitor  Remote  Linux  Host  using  Nagios  3.0 Awk  IntroducFon  Tutorial  –  7  Awk  Print  Examples How  to  Backup  Linux?  15  rsync  Command  Examples The  UlFmate  Wget  Download  Guide  With  15  Awesome  Examples Top  5  Best  Linux  Text  Editors Packet  Analyzer:  15  TCPDUMP  Command  Examples7  of  8 18  Apr  12  7:23  pm
    • 36  Items  To  Capture  For  PracFcal  Hardware  Asset  Tracking hLp://www.thegeekstuff.com/2008/08/36-­‐items-­‐to-­‐capture-­‐for... The  UlFmate  Bash  Array  Tutorial  with  15  Examples 3  Steps  to  Perform  SSH  Login  Without  Password  Using  ssh-­‐keygen  &  ssh-­‐copy-­‐id Unix  Sed  Tutorial:  Advanced  Sed  SubsFtuFon  Examples UNIX  /  Linux:  10  Netstat  Command  Examples The  UlFmate  Guide  for  CreaFng  Strong  Passwords 6  Steps  to  Secure  Your  Home  Wireless  Network Turbocharge  PuTTY  with  12  Powerful  Add-­‐Ons About  The  Geek  Stuff  My  name  is  Ramesh  Natarajan.  I  will  be  posFng  instrucFon  guides,  how-­‐to,  troubleshooFng  Fps  and  tricks on  Linux,  database,  hardware,  security  and  web.  My  focus  is  to  write  arFcles  that  will  either  teach  you  or  help  you  resolve  a problem.  Read  more  about  Ramesh  Natarajan  and  the  blog. Support  Us Support  this  blog  by  purchasing  one  of  my  ebooks. Bash  101  Hacks  eBook Sed  and  Awk  101  Hacks  eBook Vim  101  Hacks  eBook Nagios  Core  3  eBook Contact  Us Email  Me  :  Use  this  Contact  Form  to  get  in  touch  me  with  your  comments,  quesFons  or  suggesFons  about  this  site.  You  can also  simply  drop  me  a  line  to  say  hello!. Follow  us  on  TwiLer Become  a  fan  on  Facebook     Copyright  ©  2008–2012  Ramesh  Natarajan.  All  rights  reserved  |  Terms  of  Service  |  AdverFse8  of  8 18  Apr  12  7:23  pm