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15	  PracQcal	  Grep	  Command	  Examples	  In	  Linux	  /	  UNIX                                                         ...
15	  PracQcal	  Grep	  Command	  Examples	  In	  Linux	  /	  UNIX                                                         ...
15	  PracQcal	  Grep	  Command	  Examples	  In	  Linux	  /	  UNIX                                                         ...
15	  PracQcal	  Grep	  Command	  Examples	  In	  Linux	  /	  UNIX                                                         ...
15	  PracQcal	  Grep	  Command	  Examples	  In	  Linux	  /	  UNIX                                                         ...
15	  PracQcal	  Grep	  Command	  Examples	  In	  Linux	  /	  UNIX                                                         ...
15	  PracQcal	  Grep	  Command	  Examples	  In	  Linux	  /	  UNIX                                                    hZp:/...
15	  PracQcal	  Grep	  Command	  Examples	  In	  Linux	  /	  UNIX                                                         ...
15	  PracQcal	  Grep	  Command	  Examples	  In	  Linux	  /	  UNIX                                                         ...
15	  PracQcal	  Grep	  Command	  Examples	  In	  Linux	  /	  UNIX                                                         ...
15	  PracQcal	  Grep	  Command	  Examples	  In	  Linux	  /	  UNIX                                                         ...
15	  PracQcal	  Grep	  Command	  Examples	  In	  Linux	  /	  UNIX                                                         ...
15	  PracQcal	  Grep	  Command	  Examples	  In	  Linux	  /	  UNIX                                                         ...
15	  PracQcal	  Grep	  Command	  Examples	  In	  Linux	  /	  UNIX                                                         ...
15	  PracQcal	  Grep	  Command	  Examples	  In	  Linux	  /	  UNIX                                                         ...
15	  PracQcal	  Grep	  Command	  Examples	  In	  Linux	  /	  UNIX                                                         ...
15	  PracQcal	  Grep	  Command	  Examples	  In	  Linux	  /	  UNIX                                                         ...
15	  PracQcal	  Grep	  Command	  Examples	  In	  Linux	  /	  UNIX                                                         ...
15	  PracQcal	  Grep	  Command	  Examples	  In	  Linux	  /	  UNIX                                                         ...
15	  PracQcal	  Grep	  Command	  Examples	  In	  Linux	  /	  UNIX                                                         ...
15	  PracQcal	  Grep	  Command	  Examples	  In	  Linux	  /	  UNIX                                            hZp://www.the...
15	  PracQcal	  Grep	  Command	  Examples	  In	  Linux	  /	  UNIX                                                         ...
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15 practical grep command examples in linux : unix

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  1. 1. 15  PracQcal  Grep  Command  Examples  In  Linux  /  UNIX hZp://www.thegeekstuff.com/2009/03/15-­‐pracQcal-­‐unix-­‐grep... Home About Free  eBook Archives Best  of  the  Blog Contact 15  Prac(cal  Grep  Command  Examples  In  Linux  /  UNIX by  SathiyaMoorthy  on  March  26,  2009 35 Like 53 Tweet 36 Photo  courtesy  of  Alexôme’s You  should  get  a  grip  on  the  Linux  grep  command. This  is  part  of  the  on-­‐going  15  Examples  series,  where  15  detailed  examples  will  be  provided  for  a  specific  command  or  funcQonality.   Earlier  we  discussed  15  pracQcal  examples  for  Linux  find  command,    Linux  command  line  history  and  mysqladmin  command. In  this  arQcle  let  us  review  15  pracQcal  examples  of  Linux  grep  command  that  will  be  very  useful  to  both  newbies  and  experts. First  create  the  following  demo_file  that  will  be  used  in  the  examples  below  to  demonstrate  grep  command. $ cat demo_file THIS LINE IS THE 1ST UPPER CASE LINE IN THIS FILE.1  of  22 18  Apr  12  7:31  pm
  2. 2. 15  PracQcal  Grep  Command  Examples  In  Linux  /  UNIX hZp://www.thegeekstuff.com/2009/03/15-­‐pracQcal-­‐unix-­‐grep... this line is the 1st lower case line in this file. This Line Has All Its First Character Of The Word With Upper Case. Two lines above this line is empty. And this is the last line. 1.  Search  for  the  given  string  in  a  single  file The  basic  usage  of  grep  command  is  to  search  for  a  specific  string  in  the  specified  file  as  shown  below. Syntax: grep "literal_string" filename $ grep "this" demo_file this line is the 1st lower case line in this file. Two lines above this line is empty. 2.  Checking  for  the  given  string  in  mul(ple  files. Syntax: grep "string" FILE_PATTERN This  is  also  a  basic  usage  of  grep  command.  For  this  example,  let  us  copy  the  demo_file  to  demo_file1.  The  grep  output  will  also  include the  file  name  in  front  of  the  line  that  matched  the  specific  paZern  as  shown  below.  When  the  Linux  shell  sees  the  meta  character,  it  does the  expansion  and  gives  all  the  files  as  input  to  grep. $ cp demo_file demo_file1 $ grep "this" demo_* demo_file:this line is the 1st lower case line in this file. demo_file:Two lines above this line is empty. demo_file:And this is the last line. demo_file1:this line is the 1st lower case line in this file. demo_file1:Two lines above this line is empty. demo_file1:And this is the last line. 3.  Case  insensi(ve  search  using  grep  -­‐i Syntax: grep -i "string" FILE This  is  also  a  basic  usage  of  the  grep.  This  searches  for  the  given  string/paZern  case  insensiQvely.  So  it  matches  all  the  words  such  as  “the”, “THE”  and  “ The”  case  insensiQvely  as  shown  below. $ grep -i "the" demo_file THIS LINE IS THE 1ST UPPER CASE LINE IN THIS FILE. this line is the 1st lower case line in this file. This Line Has All Its First Character Of The Word With Upper Case. And this is the last line. 4.  Match  regular  expression  in  files Syntax: grep "REGEX" filename This  is  a  very  powerful  feature,  if  you  can  use  use  regular  expression  effecQvely.  In  the  following  example,  it  searches  for  all  the  paZern that  starts  with  “lines”  and  ends  with  “empty”  with  anything  in-­‐between.  i.e  To  search  “lines[anything  in-­‐between]empty”  in  the2  of  22 18  Apr  12  7:31  pm
  3. 3. 15  PracQcal  Grep  Command  Examples  In  Linux  /  UNIX hZp://www.thegeekstuff.com/2009/03/15-­‐pracQcal-­‐unix-­‐grep... demo_file. $ grep "lines.*empty" demo_file Two lines above this line is empty. From  documentaQon  of  grep:  A  regular  expression  may  be  followed  by  one  of  several  repeQQon  operators: ?  The  preceding  item  is  opQonal  and  matched  at  most  once. *  The  preceding  item  will  be  matched  zero  or  more  Qmes. +  The  preceding  item  will  be  matched  one  or  more  Qmes. {n}  The  preceding  item  is  matched  exactly  n  Qmes. {n,}  The  preceding  item  is  matched  n  or  more  Qmes. {,m}  The  preceding  item  is  matched  at  most  m  Qmes. {n,m}  The  preceding  item  is  matched  at  least  n  Qmes,  but  not  more  than  m  Qmes. 5.  Checking  for  full  words,  not  for  sub-­‐strings  using  grep  -­‐w If  you  want  to  search  for  a  word,  and  to  avoid  it  to  match  the  substrings  use  -­‐w  opQon.  Just  doing  out  a  normal  search  will  show  out  all  the lines. The  following  example  is  the  regular  grep  where  it  is  searching  for  “is”.  When  you  search  for  “is”,  without  any  opQon  it  will  show  out  “is”, “his”,  “this”  and  everything  which  has  the  substring  “is”. $ grep -i "is" demo_file THIS LINE IS THE 1ST UPPER CASE LINE IN THIS FILE. this line is the 1st lower case line in this file. This Line Has All Its First Character Of The Word With Upper Case. Two lines above this line is empty. And this is the last line. The  following  example  is  the  WORD  grep  where  it  is  searching  only  for  the  word  “is”.  Please  note  that  this  output  does  not  contain  the  line “This  Line  Has  All  Its  First  Character  Of  The  Word  With  Upper  Case”,  even  though  “is”  is  there  in  the  “ This”,  as  the  following  is  looking  only for  the  word  “is”  and  not  for  “this”. $ grep -iw "is" demo_file THIS LINE IS THE 1ST UPPER CASE LINE IN THIS FILE. this line is the 1st lower case line in this file. Two lines above this line is empty. And this is the last line. 6.  Displaying  lines  before/aQer/around  the  match  using  grep  -­‐A,  -­‐B  and  -­‐C When  doing  a  grep  on  a  huge  file,  it  may  be  useful  to  see  some  lines  aoer  the  match.  You  might  feel  handy  if  grep  can  show  you  not  only the  matching  lines  but  also  the  lines  aoer/before/around  the  match. Please  create  the  following  demo_text  file  for  this  example. $ cat demo_text 4. Vim Word Navigation You may want to do several navigation in relation to the words, such as: * e - go to the end of the current word. * E - go to the end of the current WORD. * b - go to the previous (before) word. * B - go to the previous (before) WORD. * w - go to the next word. * W - go to the next WORD.3  of  22 18  Apr  12  7:31  pm
  4. 4. 15  PracQcal  Grep  Command  Examples  In  Linux  /  UNIX hZp://www.thegeekstuff.com/2009/03/15-­‐pracQcal-­‐unix-­‐grep... WORD - WORD consists of a sequence of non-blank characters, separated with white space. word - word consists of a sequence of letters, digits and underscores. Example to show the difference between WORD and word * 192.168.1.1 - single WORD * 192.168.1.1 - seven words. 6.1  Display  N  lines  aQer  match -­‐A  is  the  opQon  which  prints  the  specified  N  lines  aoer  the  match  as  shown  below. Syntax: grep -A <N> "string" FILENAME The  following  example  prints  the  matched  line,  along  with  the  3  lines  aoer  it. $ grep -A 3 -i "example" demo_text Example to show the difference between WORD and word * 192.168.1.1 - single WORD * 192.168.1.1 - seven words. 6.2  Display  N  lines  before  match -­‐B  is  the  opQon  which  prints  the  specified  N  lines  before  the  match. Syntax: grep -B <N> "string" FILENAME When  you  had  opQon  to  show  the  N  lines  aoer  match,  you  have  the  -­‐B  opQon  for  the  opposite. $ grep -B 2 "single WORD" demo_text Example to show the difference between WORD and word * 192.168.1.1 - single WORD 6.3  Display  N  lines  around  match -­‐C  is  the  opQon  which  prints  the  specified  N  lines  before  the  match.  In  some  occasion  you  might  want  the  match  to  be  appeared  with  the lines  from  both  the  side.  This  opQons  shows  N  lines  in  both  the  side(before  &  aoer)  of  match. $ grep -C 2 "Example" demo_text word - word consists of a sequence of letters, digits and underscores. Example to show the difference between WORD and word * 192.168.1.1 - single WORD 7.  Highligh(ng  the  search  using  GREP_OPTIONS As  grep  prints  out  lines  from  the  file  by  the  paZern  /  string  you  had  given,  if  you  wanted  it  to  highlight  which  part  matches  the  line,  then you  need  to  follow  the  following  way. When  you  do  the  following  export  you  will  get  the  highlighQng  of  the  matched  searches.  In  the  following  example,  it  will  highlight  all  the this  when  you  set  the  GREP_OPTIONS  environment  variable  as  shown  below.4  of  22 18  Apr  12  7:31  pm
  5. 5. 15  PracQcal  Grep  Command  Examples  In  Linux  /  UNIX hZp://www.thegeekstuff.com/2009/03/15-­‐pracQcal-­‐unix-­‐grep... $ export GREP_OPTIONS=--color=auto GREP_COLOR=100;8 $ grep this demo_file this line is the 1st lower case line in this file. Two lines above this line is empty. And this is the last line. 8.  Searching  in  all  files  recursively  using  grep  -­‐r When  you  want  to  search  in  all  the  files  under  the  current  directory  and  its  sub  directory.  -­‐r  opQon  is  the  one  which  you  need  to  use.  The following  example  will  look  for  the  string  “ramesh”  in  all  the  files  in  the  current  directory  and  all  it’s  subdirectory. $ grep -r "ramesh" * 9.  Invert  match  using  grep  -­‐v You  had  different  opQons  to  show  the  lines  matched,  to  show  the  lines  before  match,  and  to  show  the  lines  aoer  match,  and  to  highlight match.  So  definitely  You’d  also  want  the  opQon  -­‐v  to  do  invert  match. When  you  want  to  display  the  lines  which  does  not  matches  the  given  string/paZern,  use  the  opQon  -­‐v  as  shown  below.  This  example  will display  all  the  lines  that  did  not  match  the  word  “go”. $ grep -v "go" demo_text 4. Vim Word Navigation You may want to do several navigation in relation to the words, such as: WORD - WORD consists of a sequence of non-blank characters, separated with white space. word - word consists of a sequence of letters, digits and underscores. Example to show the difference between WORD and word * 192.168.1.1 - single WORD * 192.168.1.1 - seven words. 10.  display  the  lines  which  does  not  matches  all  the  given  pa]ern. Syntax: grep -v -e "pattern" -e "pattern" $ cat test-file.txt a b c d $ grep -v -e "a" -e "b" -e "c" test-file.txt d 11.  Coun(ng  the  number  of  matches  using  grep  -­‐c When  you  want  to  count  that  how  many  lines  matches  the  given  paZern/string,  then  use  the  opQon  -­‐c. Syntax: grep -c "pattern" filename $ grep -c "go" demo_text 65  of  22 18  Apr  12  7:31  pm
  6. 6. 15  PracQcal  Grep  Command  Examples  In  Linux  /  UNIX hZp://www.thegeekstuff.com/2009/03/15-­‐pracQcal-­‐unix-­‐grep... When  you  want  do  find  out  how  many  lines  matches  the  paZern $ grep -c this demo_file 3 When  you  want  do  find  out  how  many  lines  that  does  not  match  the  paZern $ grep -v -c this demo_file 4 12.  Display  only  the  file  names  which  matches  the  given  pa]ern  using  grep  -­‐l If  you  want  the  grep  to  show  out  only  the  file  names  which  matched  the  given  paZern,  use  the  -­‐l  (lower-­‐case  L)  opQon. When  you  give  mulQple  files  to  the  grep  as  input,  it  displays  the  names  of  file  which  contains  the  text  that  matches  the  paZern,  will  be very  handy  when  you  try  to  find  some  notes  in  your  whole  directory  structure. $ grep -l this demo_* demo_file demo_file1 13.  Show  only  the  matched  string By  default  grep  will  show  the  line  which  matches  the  given  paZern/string,  but  if  you  want  the  grep  to  show  out  only  the  matched  string  of the  paZern  then  use  the  -­‐o  opQon. It  might  not  be  that  much  useful  when  you  give  the  string  straight  forward.  But  it  becomes  very  useful  when  you  give  a  regex  paZern  and trying  to  see  what  it  matches  as $ grep -o "is.*line" demo_file is line is the 1st lower case line is line is is the last line 14.  Show  the  posi(on  of  match  in  the  line When  you  want  grep  to  show  the  posiQon  where  it  matches  the  paZern  in  the  file,  use  the  following  opQons  as Syntax: grep -o -b "pattern" file $ cat temp-file.txt 12345 12345 $ grep -o -b "3" temp-file.txt 2:3 8:3 Note:  The  output  of  the  grep  command  above  is  not  the  posiQon  in  the  line,  it  is  byte  offset  of  the  whole  file. 15.  Show  line  number  while  displaying  the  output  using  grep  -­‐n To  show  the  line  number  of  file  with  the  line  matched.  It  does  1-­‐based  line  numbering  for  each  file.  Use  -­‐n  opQon  to  uQlize  this  feature. $ grep -n "go" demo_text 5: * e - go to the end of the current word. 6: * E - go to the end of the current WORD.6  of  22 18  Apr  12  7:31  pm
  7. 7. 15  PracQcal  Grep  Command  Examples  In  Linux  /  UNIX hZp://www.thegeekstuff.com/2009/03/15-­‐pracQcal-­‐unix-­‐grep... 7: * b - go to the previous (before) word. 8: * B - go to the previous (before) WORD. 9: * w - go to the next word. 10: * W - go to the next WORD. Addi(onal  Grep  Tutorials 7  Linux  Grep  OR,  Grep  AND,  Grep  NOT  Operator  Examples Regular  Expressions  in  Grep  Command  with  10  Examples  –  Part  I Advanced  Regular  Expressions  in  Grep  Command  with  10  Examples  –  Part  II Search  in  a  *.bz2  file  using  bzgrep,  and  *.gz  file  using  zgrep Awesome  Linux  Ar(cles Following  are  few  awesome  15  examples  arQcles  that  you  might  find  helpful. Linux  Crontab:  15  Awesome  Cron  Job  Examples Mommy,  I  found  it!  —  15  PracQcal  Linux  Find  Command  Examples 15  Examples  To  Master  Linux  Command  Line  History Unix  LS  Command:  15  PracQcal  Examples 35 Tweet 36 Like 53  Share  Comment If  you  enjoyed  this  ar(cle,  you  might  also  like.. 1. 50  Linux  Sysadmin  Tutorials Awk  IntroducQon  –  7  Awk  Print  Examples 2. 50  Most  Frequently  Used  Linux  Commands  (With  Examples) Advanced  Sed  SubsQtuQon  Examples 3. Top  25  Best  Linux  Performance  Monitoring  and  Debugging  Tools 8  EssenQal  Vim  Editor  NavigaQon  Fundamentals 4. Mommy,  I  found  it!  –  15  PracQcal  Linux  Find  Command 25  Most  Frequently  Used  Linux  IPTables  Rules Examples Examples 5. Linux  101  Hacks  2nd  EdiQon  eBook   Turbocharge  PuTTY  with  12  Powerful  Add-­‐Ons Tags:  File  Search  UQlity,  Grep  Command,  Highlight  Search  Output,  Linux  Full-­‐Text  Searching,  Linux  Grep  Command,  Search  File  Content, Search  MulQple  Files {  71  comments…  read  them  below  or  add  one  } 1  Joao  Trindade  March  28,  2009  at  3:54  am7  of  22 18  Apr  12  7:31  pm
  8. 8. 15  PracQcal  Grep  Command  Examples  In  Linux  /  UNIX hZp://www.thegeekstuff.com/2009/03/15-­‐pracQcal-­‐unix-­‐grep... You  have  a  small  glitch: >>  4.  Match  regular  expression  in  files  using  grep  -­‐i Don’t  you  mean: 4.  Match  regular  expression  in  files  using  grep  -­‐e The  rest  of  the  post  is  great. 2  Ramesh  March  29,  2009  at  12:16  am Joao, Thanks  for  poinQng  it  out.  I  have  corrected  it.  Also,  we  can  do  REGEX  without  the  opQon  -­‐e  as  shown  in  the  example  #4. From  Man  Pages: SYNOPSIS grep [options] PATTERN [FILE...] grep [options] [-e PATTERN | -f FILE] [FILE...] -e PATTERN, --regexp=PATTERN Use PATTERN as the pattern; useful to protect patterns beginning with -. 3  dragon  March  31,  2009  at  11:26  pm Hi: FYI,  Qp  14  will  be 2:3 8:3 on  Ubuntu  system.  (including  the  n  character  I  guess 4  Ramesh  March  31,  2009  at  11:44  pm Dragon, Thanks  for  poinQng  it  out.  I’ve  corrected  it. 5  Francesco  Talamona  April  26,  2009  at  2:48  am I  find  very  useful  the  following  command,  when  you  have  to  deal  with  a  very  lengthy  configuraQon  file  full  of  comments: grep  -­‐v  -­‐E  ‘^#|^$’  /etc/squid/squid.conf It  skips  every  line  beginning  with  an  hash  (#)  or  empty,  so  you  can  see  at  a  glance  the  15  lines  edited  out  of  a  +4400  lines  text  file. BTW  interesQng  topics,  great  posts… 6  albar  May  7,  2009  at  7:51  pm help  me how  to  bzgrep  :  ^C02 but  ^C  is  count  as  one  special  character, in  this  word: data1^C02data2 thank’s 7  Ramesh  Natarajan  May  8,  2009  at  5:51  pm @Francesco  Talamona,8  of  22 18  Apr  12  7:31  pm
  9. 9. 15  PracQcal  Grep  Command  Examples  In  Linux  /  UNIX hZp://www.thegeekstuff.com/2009/03/15-­‐pracQcal-­‐unix-­‐grep... Thanks  a  lot  for  sharing  your  grep  command  example.  Yes.  all  those  empty  lines  and  comment  lines  can  get  very  annoying  when you  do  grep.  So,  it  is  an  excellent  idea  to  hide  them  in  the  grep  output  with  your  examples. 8  sasikala  May  11,  2009  at  9:41  pm @albar, try  like  this grep  ‘^C02ʹ′ 9  albar  May  12,  2009  at  1:18  am @sasikala  , i  do  have  try  that  too,  but  sQll  got  nothing, but  it  works  when  ^  and  C  count  as  two  character thank’s 10  SathiyaMoorthy  May  12,  2009  at  4:33  am @albar You  should  type  ^C  as  ctrl-­‐v  +  ctrl-­‐c  in  grep  as  single  character  as $  grep  ^C02  file Dont  escape,  dont  type  it  as  ^  C  as  two  characters.  Hope  this  helps. 11  albar  May  12,  2009  at  8:59  pm @sathiya, god  bless  u  all it  work’s  thanks 12  Manish  Patel  May  21,  2009  at  7:00  pm Hi I  am  trying  to  exclude  the  last  word  of  all  the  line  like  sync.php,  uploads.php,  backup.php File  text  include  as  below /usr/home/htdocs/drag-­‐and-­‐drop/htdocs.php /usr/home//htdocs/sms/publish/pages/sync.php /usr/home/htdocs/track/backup.php /usr/home/htdocs/smstest/smstest.php /usr/home/htdocs/uploads.php /usr/home/htdocs/017/backup.php How  can  I  achieve  that  using  grep  or  sed  or  awk Also  how  I  can  use  “*”  wildcard  in  sed  command  like  to  replace  *.php  to  *.txt  or  any  other  extension. Thank  you  in  advance. Manish 13  Francesco  Talamona  May  21,  2009  at  10:36  pm Are  you  restricted  to  sed  or  awk? 1) dirname  ‘/usr/home/htdocs/drag-­‐and-­‐drop/htdocs.php’9  of  22 18  Apr  12  7:31  pm
  10. 10. 15  PracQcal  Grep  Command  Examples  In  Linux  /  UNIX hZp://www.thegeekstuff.com/2009/03/15-­‐pracQcal-­‐unix-­‐grep... /usr/home/htdocs/drag-­‐and-­‐drop 2) rename  does  what  you  want 14  Manish  Patel  May  24,  2009  at  6:55  pm Hi, Those  lines  are  the  contents  of  the  text  file  and  I  don’t  want  to  change  the  actual  directory  or  the  file  on  server.  I  want  to  change the  contents  of  the  file  where  all  file  file  names  ending  at  the  line  should  be  removed.  So  the  final  file  contents  should  look  like this cat  filecontenet.txt /usr/home/htdocs/drag-­‐and-­‐drop/ /usr/home//htdocs/sms/publish/pages/ /usr/home/htdocs/track/ /usr/home/htdocs/smstest/ /usr/home/htdocs/ /usr/home/htdocs/ I  think  rename  would  not  help  here  in  ediQng  file  contents. Thank  you Manish 15  SathiyaMoorthy  May  24,  2009  at  11:43  pm rev  filecontenet.txt  |  cut  -­‐d’/’  -­‐f2-­‐  |  rev rev  filecontenet.txt  –>  reverses  the  file  and  pipes  to  cut  command. cut  -­‐d’/’  -­‐f2-­‐  –>  cuts  off  the  first  field  (  cuts  off  last  field,  as  it  is  reversed  ). rev  –>  prints  the  output  given  order. 16  P0B0T  May  26,  2009  at  11:36  pm Manish, I  believe  you’re  looking  for  the  following sed  -­‐e  ‘s/.php$//’  filecontenet.txt 17  P0B0T  May  26,  2009  at  11:39  pm Sorry,  didn’t  read  your  requirement  carefully. Try  this: sed  -­‐e  ‘s//[^/]*.php$///’  filecontenet.txt 18  Manish  Patel  June  5,  2009  at  5:31  pm Hi Thank  you  to  Sathiya  Moorthy  and  P0B0T. Both  soluQon  worked  very  nicely  for  me. P0B0T  can  you  explain  how  your  command  works  for  each  defined  opQon  ’s//[^/]*.php$///’ Thank  you Manish10  of  22 18  Apr  12  7:31  pm
  11. 11. 15  PracQcal  Grep  Command  Examples  In  Linux  /  UNIX hZp://www.thegeekstuff.com/2009/03/15-­‐pracQcal-­‐unix-­‐grep... 19  mano  June  10,  2009  at  3:00  am The  above  info  on  grep  is  really  great.  I  want  to  search  for  a  string  in  all  the  files  in  the  directory  and  add  a  $  symbol  at  the  start  of the  searched  line  and  save  in  the  same  file. 20  SathiyaMoorthy  June  18,  2009  at  10:49  pm @mano More  than  using  grep  for  this  requirement,  you  can  use  sed  which  is: sed  -­‐i  ‘s/.*abc.*/$&/’  * -­‐i  :  edit  the  input  file. s///  :  subsQtute  the  matched  paZern  with  the  replacement  string. /.*abc.*/  :  match  the  string  abc /$&/  :  Replace  with  $  followed  by  matched  string. *  :  all  the  files  in  the  current  directory. This  is  one  way  of  saQsfying  your  requirement,  there  may  be  other  efficient  ways. Hope  this  helps. 21  mano  June  19,  2009  at  12:17  am Hi  SathiaMoorthy,  Thank  u  so  much.  it  works  fine.  If  I  need  to  search  for  files  in  all  subdirectories,  how  should  this  “sed”  command modified? Thanks  in  advance. mano 22  SathiyaMoorthy  June  27,  2009  at  12:05  am @mano ModificaQon  in  sed  command  is  not  needed. To  search  for  all  files  in  the  subdirectory. find  .  -­‐type  f Execute  the  command  on  all  those  files  with  -­‐exec. find  .  -­‐type  f  -­‐exec  sed  -­‐i  ‘s/.*abc.*/#&/’  {}  ; But  think  twice  before  execuQng  this  command,  because  it  will  recursively  edit  all  the  files.  Taking  backup  before  execuQng  this command  is  wise. Refer  the  earlier  arQcle  linux  find  command  examples. 23  Vidya  July  1,  2009  at  2:59  am Hi, I  want  to  grep  next  3  words  in  a  line  from  the  matching  criteria  word.. like  if  the  line  is This  is  -­‐g  gateway  -­‐e  enterprise  -­‐s  server Then  I  want  to  grep  “-­‐g  gateway  -­‐e  enterprise”  from  the  line Can  you  please  help  me  in  this  case. Here  gateway  and  enterprise  value  can  be  anything  so  need  to  grep  next  3  words  starQng  form  “-­‐g” 24  SathiyaMoorthy  July  1,  2009  at  5:58  am11  of  22 18  Apr  12  7:31  pm
  12. 12. 15  PracQcal  Grep  Command  Examples  In  Linux  /  UNIX hZp://www.thegeekstuff.com/2009/03/15-­‐pracQcal-­‐unix-­‐grep... @Vidhya $  grep  -­‐o  -­‐E  —  “-­‐g  w+  -­‐e  w+”  FILENAME -­‐g  gateway  -­‐e  enterprise ExplanaQon  of  the  above  command., -­‐o  :  only  matching  (  point  13.  ) -­‐E  :  extended  regexp —  :  indicate  end  of  opQons w+  :  word 25  Vidya  July  1,  2009  at  9:00  am Hi  Sathiya, Its  not  working. It  says grep:  illegal  opQon  —  o grep:  illegal  opQon  —  E Usage:  grep  -­‐hblcnsviw  paZern  file  .  .  . I  am  working  on  Solaris  and  se…ng  shell  as  bash. 26  Amit  Agarwal  September  21,  2009  at  6:18  am grep  version  on  solaris  is  liZle  older  and  as  man  would  show  you  all  these  opQons  are  not  available,  so  you  can  try  ack (standalone)  version  which  is  very  powerful  and  requires  only  perl  to  be  installed. 27  learner  October  7,  2009  at  5:31  am Hi, How  to  use  grep  to  find  lines  containing  mulQple  strings ex:  line1:Today  is  oct  7,  wednesday.  not  8th line2:  This  is  not  summer. line3:  when  is  summer? I  want  to  return  line2  containing  strings  “not”  and  “summer”  both. Thank  You. 28  SathiyaMoorthy  October  7,  2009  at  10:41  am @learner There  are  several  ways  possible,  use  the  one  which  you  find  as  appropriate. $ grep "not.*summer" file1 line2: This is not summer. $ grep "not" file1 | grep "summer" line2: This is not summer. 29  learner  October  7,  2009  at  10:56  pm @SathiyaMoorthy Thank  You  for  your  very  quick  reply. My  quesQon  was  not  piping  and  hard  coding  every  string  ,  as  i  menQoned  mulQple  strings,  i  was  looking  for  something  in  likes  of grep  -­‐F  ‘string1 string2 string312  of  22 18  Apr  12  7:31  pm
  13. 13. 15  PracQcal  Grep  Command  Examples  In  Linux  /  UNIX hZp://www.thegeekstuff.com/2009/03/15-­‐pracQcal-­‐unix-­‐grep... string4 ….. stringn’  filename which  returns  single  occurrence  of  something  like  either  string1  ,string2,..  stringn  or  all  ..,  what  i  wanted  was  only  string1  and string2  and  …….  stringn  begin  returned. [please  note  that  i  will  be  provided  with  strings  as  newline  separated  strings  ,which  i  dont  want  to  parse  again  and  i  have constraint  of  using  grep  only] Thank  You. 30  Ashish  December  1,  2009  at  4:07  pm Hi, I  need  to  sthing  like  this I  have  a  file  containing  400  domainId  values  seprated  by  new  line ex.  domain.txt domain1 domain2 domain3… I  have  a  script  that  takes  each  domain  and  calls  an  api  that  returns  me  an  xml. like  this  for  each  domain val1 domain1 val2 val3 val4 XXX val1 now  i  want  to  spit  out  the  domain  name  in  a  file  that  does  not  matches  domainid  value  XXX. how  can  i  do  it  using  grep TIA 31  Ashish  December  1,  2009  at  4:16  pm Hi, I  need  to  sthing  like  this I  have  a  file  containing  400  domainId  values  seprated  by  new  line ex.  domain.txt domain1 domain2 domain3… I  have  a  script  that  takes  each  domain  and  calls  an  api  that  returns  me  an  xml. like  this  for  each  domain <tag1>val1</tag1> <domain>domain1</domain> <tag2>val2</tag2> <tag3>val3</tag3> <tag4>val4</tag4> <domainid>XXX</domainid> <tag5>val1</tag5> now  i  want  to  spit  out  the  domain  name  in  a  file  that  does  not  matches  domainid  value  XXX.13  of  22 18  Apr  12  7:31  pm
  14. 14. 15  PracQcal  Grep  Command  Examples  In  Linux  /  UNIX hZp://www.thegeekstuff.com/2009/03/15-­‐pracQcal-­‐unix-­‐grep... how  can  i  do  it  using  grep TIA 32  Varun  December  17,  2009  at  7:16  am Hi, The  opQons  menQoned  in  point  6  for  displaying  the  context  with  A,  B,  &  C  does  not  seem  to  work  on  Solaris  10  with  both  grep  & egrep Is  there  a  version  of  this  grep  available  for  Solaris? Thank  you, Varun. 33  Jawn  Hewz  December  21,  2009  at  7:54  pm Does  the  -­‐b  (byte  offset)  work  when  greping  binary  files?  I  do  not  get  an  offset  returned  when  I  grep  a  binary  file,  but  I  do  when using  a  text  file.  I  am  using  grep  under  Cygwin. 34  fety  January  11,  2010  at  3:32  am thanks  very  much  for  this  tutorial.  it  is  very  helpful.. 35  eMancu  January  24,  2010  at  12:49  pm Awsome  tutorial! I’m  reading  all  your  blog,  its  amazing! 36  Raghu  Baba  January  30,  2010  at  4:44  am Hai..  I  want  to  Parse  my  file  ..  Word  to  Excel  ..  so  tell  me  some  grep  &  cut  commands… 37  Jeff  Floyd  February  1,  2010  at  6:54  pm Whats  the  difference  between  $  grep  -­‐c  ill  memo  and  $  grep  -­‐n  ill  memo? 38  joeq  February  4,  2010  at  3:57  am hi i  got  1  problem…how  can  i  find  a  numbers  like  99,000,000.95  in  my  server  database  using  unix  command.. tq 39  abhishek  February  21,  2010  at  4:31  am content  was  very  useful 40  Anonymous  March  8,  2010  at  4:26  am Hi, Those  lines  are  the  contents  of  the  text  file  and  I  don’t  want  to  change  the  actual  directory  or  the  file  on  server.  I  want  to  change the  contents  of  the  file  where  all  file  file  names  ending  at  the  line  should  be  removed.  So  the  final  file  contents  should  look  like this cat  filecontenet.txt /usr/home/htdocs/drag-­‐and-­‐drop/ /usr/home//htdocs/sms/publish/pages/ /usr/home/htdocs/track/ /usr/home/htdocs/smstest/ /usr/home/htdocs/ /usr/home/htdocs/14  of  22 18  Apr  12  7:31  pm
  15. 15. 15  PracQcal  Grep  Command  Examples  In  Linux  /  UNIX hZp://www.thegeekstuff.com/2009/03/15-­‐pracQcal-­‐unix-­‐grep... I  think  rename  would  not  help  here  in  ediQng  file  contents. for  this  quesQon  ,  awk  really  helpful  with  single  line  command go  to  the  current  directory ls  -­‐l  |  grep  -­‐v  ^d  |  awk  ‘{print  $9}’  >  new.txt $9  —  is  the  last  filed  which  is  filename  only  when  u  list  with  opQon  ls  -­‐l  , new.txt  contains  only  the  filenames  which  you  wnated  to  filter  out 41  skipper  March  26,  2010  at  5:54  am nice  arQcle 42  VIKAS  April  4,  2010  at  7:23  pm Excellent  stuff,  just  loved  grep  -­‐A,B,C  opQons and grep  -­‐o  “xxxx.*yyyy”  kinda  commands. This  will  help  me  a  lot,  I  used  awk  more  in  my  shell  scripts,  But  I  have  got  a  new  friend  “grep”  for  some  selecQve  prinQng   43  Sam  April  17,  2010  at  3:35  am I  have  just  finish  reading  this  wonderful  arQcle.  Let  me  answer  this: Whats  the  difference  between  $  grep  -­‐c  ill  memo  and  $  grep  -­‐n  ill  memo? grep  -­‐c  return  the  number  lines  that  matched  ill  in  memo. grep  -­‐n  return  the  matched  lines  with  line-­‐number  as  prefix. 44  Chong  April  20,  2010  at  3:05  am how  to  grep  a  statement  contain  ‘*’  from  a  file  at  the  same  Qme  to  match  the  first  character  too. example  the  statement  in  filename  profile.txt  :-­‐ “Mary  stay  at  uZana*istana  with  her  grandmum” current  grep  statement  :-­‐ grep  “^Mary  stay  at  uZana*istana”  profile.txt result:  no  row  matched  the  grep  statement  because  of  * How  to  use  grep  command  for  the  combine  condiQon  of  statement  with  *  and  match  the  front  word? 45  vm  April  30,  2010  at  8:24  pm In  bash  script  without  using  perl,  how  i  can  grep  a  number  from  a  file  if  there  exists  a  number  greater  than  80  in  that  file. 46  palash  June  13,  2010  at  12:14  pm grep  -­‐c  “paZern”  filename  returns  the  number  of  lines  that  matches  the  paZern,  even  if  the  paZern  occurred  for  more  than  one Qme  in  any  line.  Is  there  any  opQon  to  know  how  many  Qmes  the  paZern  matched  in  a  file? 47  mathan  June  20,  2010  at  10:21  am HI, I  am  new  to  linux… can  you  tell  me  how  to  exit  from  grep  command…. mistakenly  i  type  grep  filename But  it’s  nothing  shown….  pls  looking  for  quick  reply… 48  SathiyaMoorthy  July  4,  2010  at  7:20  am15  of  22 18  Apr  12  7:31  pm
  16. 16. 15  PracQcal  Grep  Command  Examples  In  Linux  /  UNIX hZp://www.thegeekstuff.com/2009/03/15-­‐pracQcal-­‐unix-­‐grep... @mathan There  is  nothing  like  exiQng  from  grep. First  argument  to  grep  is  taken  as  PATTERN,  not  as  filename.  So  as  far  as  i  understand  it  is  waiQng  for  input  to  match.  So  just  exit from  it  using  CTRL+D. 49  Ross  HuggeZ  September  16,  2010  at  5:04  am Nice  arQcle.  Thanks. 50  ec  October  6,  2010  at  6:14  pm Hi  to  all, I  just  started  to  learn  linux  a  month  ago Can  I  extract  2  to  6  leZer  words  from  a  text  file  using  one  grep  command  only! To  menQon  that  each  word  is  on  its  own  line what’s  the  grep  command  to  do  this  job? I  tried  any  combinaQon  of  grep  and  not  the  result  which  I  am  looking  for 51  Lou  February  24,  2011  at  1:16  pm Is  there  a  way  to  grep  for  a  word  on  in  a  file  and  return  that  line  plus  the  next? 52  Francesco  Talamona  February  26,  2011  at  3:33  am @  Lou: cat  tes‰ile.txt first  line matching  line following  line ending  line grep  matching  -­‐B  1  tes‰ile.txt first  line matching  line 53  abhishek  kumar  April  19,  2011  at  12:53  pm really  to  nice  and  too  simple  to  understand, thats  great thank  you 54  Nikita  April  21,  2011  at  12:06  pm PLEASE  HELP  ON  QUESTION  B. You  are  searching  a  file  for  lines  that  contain  US  state  abbreviaQons  in  parentheses.  e.g.:  (ma),(NH),(Ky),  etc.  So  you  decide  to match  any  line  containing  (  )  with  exactly  two  characters  (not  leZers)  in  between. A)  What  grep  will  get  this  done? My  Answer—>  grep  ‘([a-­‐zA-­‐Z][A-­‐Za-­‐z])’  file You  now  noQce  that  some  of  the  lines  that  the  grep  from  part  A  matched  contain  the  the  string  (expired).  You  want  to  eliminate these  lines  from  your  output,  so  you  decide  to  pipe  your  output  to  another  grep. B)  What  will  the  new  command  be?  (both  greps  with  the  pipe) My  Answer  —>  grep  –v  grep  |  grep  ‘([a-­‐zA-­‐Z]  [A-­‐Za-­‐z])’  ——-­‐>  PLEASE  HELP!16  of  22 18  Apr  12  7:31  pm
  17. 17. 15  PracQcal  Grep  Command  Examples  In  Linux  /  UNIX hZp://www.thegeekstuff.com/2009/03/15-­‐pracQcal-­‐unix-­‐grep... 55  Francesco  Talamona  April  22,  2011  at  12:44  pm @Nikita: One  step  is  enough: egrep  ‘([a-­‐zA-­‐Z]{2})’  file 56  suprabhat  April  27,  2011  at  3:26  am How  to  display  all  lines  that  have  less  than  9  character  in  a  file 57  Paul  May  16,  2011  at  3:09  pm I’m  new  to  linux;  was  wondering  what  does  #  aoer  the  grep  command  accomplish,  as  shown  in  the  example  below? grep  #  input*.txt  |  awk  ‘{print  $4}’  |  sort  |  uniq  >  output.txt thank  you 58  Dinesh  May  17,  2011  at  4:03  pm For  a  given  patern  like Fri  Nov  26  16:04:52  2010 I  want  to  grep  for  all  the  lines  in  a  file  having  the  above  format. But  I  have  all  the  values  except  for  the  Qme,  that  is  “16:04:52  ”  ,  the  data  I  have  is “Fri  Nov  26  2010  ”  .  The  file  is  having  5  years  of  date  with  the  Qmestamp  as  specified  above. Please  let  me  know  How  shall  I  grep  the  file  to  get  all  the  lines  on  the  date  “Fri  Nov  26  2010  ”  . thanks 59  shyam  May  29,  2011  at  10:45  pm i  have  a  doubt  here  i  tried  to  look  at  output  of  cmd grep  “[^A-­‐Z]”  file.txt this  is  showing  all  characters  excluding  capital  leZer what  does  this  command  actually  do 60  shivaraj  PaQl  July  25,  2011  at  11:14  am HI  i  have  a  file  with  this  values 100  first  line 101  second  line 101 102 102 109 now  i  need  a  script  that  can  take  two  lines  and  find  which  is  greatest 61  sudheer  September  10,  2011  at  8:32  pm 1)  Use  grep  (or  awk)  to  output  all  lines  in  a  given  file  which  contain  employee  ID  numbers.  Assume  that  each  employee  ID  number consists  of  1-­‐4  digits  followed  by  two  leZers:  the  first  is  either  a  W  or  a  S  and  the  second  is  either  a  C  or  a  T.  ID  numbers  never start  with  0s.  Further  assume  that  an  employee  ID  is  always  proceeded  by  some  type  of  white  space  –  tab,  blank,  new  line  etc. However,  there  might  be  characters  aoer  it,  for  example  punctuaQon. What  to  turn  in:  Turn  in  three  things: a.  A  file  with  the  regular  expression  which  can  directly  be  used  by  grep  (or  awk) b.  A  text  file  which  you  used  to  test  your  regular  expression.  Make  sure  that  you  include  valid  and  ‘invalid’  employee  IDs,  have them  at  the  beginning  and  the  end  of  lines,  sentences,  etc.17  of  22 18  Apr  12  7:31  pm
  18. 18. 15  PracQcal  Grep  Command  Examples  In  Linux  /  UNIX hZp://www.thegeekstuff.com/2009/03/15-­‐pracQcal-­‐unix-­‐grep... c.  A  second  document  which  re-­‐writes  the  regular  expression  in  a  more  human-­‐readable  form  and  explains  the  purpose  of  the different  components  of  the  regular  expression.  Also  include  a  short  explanaQon  of  your  test  cases. 2)  Use  grep  (or  awk)  to  output  all  the  lines  in  a  given  file  which  contain  a  decimal  number  (e.g.  a  number  which  includes  a  decimal point).  Decimal  numbers  do  not  have  leading  zeros  but  they  might  have  trailing  zeros.  Assume  the  number  is  always  surrounded by  white  space. What  to  turn  in:  The  same  three  things  as  above  (except,  of  course,  for  this  problem). 3)  Write  a  regular  expression  for  the  valid  idenQfiers  in  Java.  You  are  allowed  to  use  ‘shortcuts’,  but  need  to  make  sure  that  you specify  exactly  what  they  are  (e.g.  if  you  use  digit  specify  that  that  means  0,  1,  2,  3,  ….9.) 62  Dinesh  September  22,  2011  at  12:43  pm Paul grep  #  input*.txt  |  awk  ‘{print  $4}’  |  sort  |  uniq  >  output.txt Since  #  is  a  special  character,we  are  treaQng  #  as  #  by  pu…ng  backslash  infront  of  that. Noe  Greap  searches  for  paZern  #  in  a  list  of  file  starQng  as  input  and  nding  a  txt  and  then  awk  prints  the  4th  field  and  sort  is  doing sorQng  the  4th  field  returns  from  awk  and  unis  is  doing  uniq  operaQon. 63  Dinesh  September  22,  2011  at  12:45  pm Shyam grep  “[^A-­‐Z]”  file.txt Grep  will  print  the  lines  that  does  not  start  with  CAPTIAL  LETTERS. Using  ^  inside  the  []  will  do  the  work  opposite  to  the  paZern  what  you  have  been  searching  for  … 64  haydarekarrar  December  23,  2011  at  4:29  am Just  a  minor  thing  the  last  result  line  is  removed  in  the  example  above,  this  should  be  the  result: $  grep  “this”  greptest.txt this  line  is  the  1st  lower  case  line  in  this  file. Two  lines  above  this  line  is  empty. And  this  is  the  last  line. 65  gotham  January  22,  2012  at  4:32  am awesome.  thanks  a  lot. 66  edward  January  31,  2012  at  2:20  am For  example  my  data  is  (file.ave)  : MRR  120101000000  UTC+07  AVE  60  STF  150  ASL H  150  300  450  600  750  900 TF  0.0149  0.0515  0.1171 F00  -­‐67.04 F01  -­‐69.27 I  use  grep  as: grep  -­‐r  ‘MRR’  *.ave  >  Qme_0101.txt.  In  this  case  all  file  goes  to  Qme_0101.txt,  I  have  many  files  and  I  need  each  output  goes  to specific  file  name.  Any  idea  ?  And  how  to  use  grep  to  take  F00  and  F01  ?  If  I  use  grep  -­‐r  ‘F’  *.ave,  the  first  line  will  be  taken  also because  of  STF,  Thanks  for  help.. 67  shrikant  February  14,  2012  at  10:23  am18  of  22 18  Apr  12  7:31  pm
  19. 19. 15  PracQcal  Grep  Command  Examples  In  Linux  /  UNIX hZp://www.thegeekstuff.com/2009/03/15-­‐pracQcal-­‐unix-­‐grep... Thank  you   68  chinna  February  19,  2012  at  8:48  am here  my  quesQon  is  in  a  directory  i  have  10  files.some  files  contains  size  in  kb’s  and  some  files  contains  size  in  mb’s…..i  want display  the  files  only  which  file  size  is  more  than  1  mb…… could  anybudy  help  to  find  answer  for  this  quesQon…. 69  Anderson  Venturini  March  14,  2012  at  6:01  am Great  post!  It  was  very  useful!  thanks  a  lot!   70  Anonymous  April  9,  2012  at  3:22  pm To  answer  Chinna…  If  you  have  some  files  showing  M,  and  some  K,  then  your  “ls”  command  is  probably  running  on  a  Linux  box, and  using  the  “-­‐h”  opQon. The  preferred  method  would  be  NOT  to  use  the  “-­‐h”  opQon,  and  let  “ls”  print  file  sizes  in  bytes,  which  means  that  your  script  will be  able  to  get  the  same  units+detail  for  all  file  sizes  listed. Then  you  can  use  “awk”  to  filter  out  files  where  $5  (5th  field)  is  over  1Meg,  like  this: /bin/ls  -­‐l  |  awk  ‘$5>=2^20ʹ′ If  you  only  want  file  names,  not  ‘ls’  style  list,  then  have  awk  give  you  that  part  of  output: /bin/ls  -­‐l  |  awk  ‘$5>=2^20{print  $NF}’ Note:  this  does  not  like  file  names  with  spaces… —-­‐ notes  for  Other  posQngs  on  this  thread: To:  Francesco  Talamona (who  was  using  “grep”  to  remove  ##_comments  from  long  config  files) grep  -­‐v  -­‐E  ‘^#|^$’  /etc/squid/squid.conf You  may  want  to  remove  comments  that  do  NOT  start  on  the  first  char  of  a  line, and  ‘sed’  is  more  useful  for  that sed  ‘s/#.*$//;/^[  ]*$/d’  /etc/squid/squid.conf This  will  remove  comments  from  each  line,  then  discard  the  line  if  blank,  or  only  spaces  remain. ========= Also,  where  the  -­‐B  and  -­‐A  opQons  are  described  for  “grep”… This  is  for  GNU/Linux,  and  not  supported  for  most  Non-­‐Linux  boxes. #–JETS 71  KHEE  April  15,  2012  at  8:39  pm Hi  expert, i  am  new  to  unix  env… try  to  use  certain  command  to  help  me  generate  1  output  file  as  below: input  file: A A/I  0.2  0.3  0.8 B B/I  0.6  0.8  0.9 C C  0.8  2.1  6.0 I  just  want  to  grep  all  A  B  C  only,  where  want  to  skip  the  line  which  have  the  number  together.  And  my  output  file  paZern  is  A  B  C D…etc  (  A,  B,C  all  are  a  word).19  of  22 18  Apr  12  7:31  pm
  20. 20. 15  PracQcal  Grep  Command  Examples  In  Linux  /  UNIX hZp://www.thegeekstuff.com/2009/03/15-­‐pracQcal-­‐unix-­‐grep... mean  i  want  first,second  line,  and  skip  3rd  &  4th  lines,  thanks  for  help. Leave  a  Comment Name E-­‐mail Website  NoQfy  me  of  followup  comments  via  e-­‐mail Submit Previous  post:  Mergecap  and  Tshark:  Merge  Packet  Dumps  and  Analyze  Network  Traffic Next  post:  4  Ways  to  IdenQfy  Who  is  Logged-­‐In  on  Your  Linux  System Sign  up  for  our  free  email  newsleZer   you@address.com           Sign Up            RSS    TwiZer    Facebook   Search EBOOKS20  of  22 18  Apr  12  7:31  pm
  21. 21. 15  PracQcal  Grep  Command  Examples  In  Linux  /  UNIX hZp://www.thegeekstuff.com/2009/03/15-­‐pracQcal-­‐unix-­‐grep... POPULAR  POSTS 12  Amazing  and  EssenQal  Linux  Books  To  Enrich  Your  Brain  and  Library 50  UNIX  /  Linux  Sysadmin  Tutorials 50  Most  Frequently  Used  UNIX  /  Linux  Commands  (With  Examples) How  To  Be  ProducQve  and  Get  Things  Done  Using  GTD 30  Things  To  Do  When  you  are  Bored  and  have  a  Computer Linux  Directory  Structure  (File  System  Structure)  Explained  with  Examples Linux  Crontab:  15  Awesome  Cron  Job  Examples Get  a  Grip  on  the  Grep!  –  15  PracQcal  Grep  Command  Examples Unix  LS  Command:  15  PracQcal  Examples 15  Examples  To  Master  Linux  Command  Line  History Top  10  Open  Source  Bug  Tracking  System Vi  and  Vim  Macro  Tutorial:  How  To  Record  and  Play Mommy,  I  found  it!  -­‐-­‐  15  PracQcal  Linux  Find  Command  Examples 15  Awesome  Gmail  Tips  and  Tricks 15  Awesome  Google  Search  Tips  and  Tricks RAID  0,  RAID  1,  RAID  5,  RAID  10  Explained  with  Diagrams Can  You  Top  This?  15  PracQcal  Linux  Top  Command  Examples Top  5  Best  System  Monitoring  Tools Top  5  Best  Linux  OS  DistribuQons How  To  Monitor  Remote  Linux  Host  using  Nagios  3.0 Awk  IntroducQon  Tutorial  –  7  Awk  Print  Examples How  to  Backup  Linux?  15  rsync  Command  Examples The  UlQmate  Wget  Download  Guide  With  15  Awesome  Examples Top  5  Best  Linux  Text  Editors Packet  Analyzer:  15  TCPDUMP  Command  Examples The  UlQmate  Bash  Array  Tutorial  with  15  Examples21  of  22 18  Apr  12  7:31  pm
  22. 22. 15  PracQcal  Grep  Command  Examples  In  Linux  /  UNIX hZp://www.thegeekstuff.com/2009/03/15-­‐pracQcal-­‐unix-­‐grep... 3  Steps  to  Perform  SSH  Login  Without  Password  Using  ssh-­‐keygen  &  ssh-­‐copy-­‐id Unix  Sed  Tutorial:  Advanced  Sed  SubsQtuQon  Examples UNIX  /  Linux:  10  Netstat  Command  Examples The  UlQmate  Guide  for  CreaQng  Strong  Passwords 6  Steps  to  Secure  Your  Home  Wireless  Network Turbocharge  PuTTY  with  12  Powerful  Add-­‐Ons About  The  Geek  Stuff  My  name  is  Ramesh  Natarajan.  I  will  be  posQng  instrucQon  guides,  how-­‐to,  troubleshooQng  Qps  and  tricks  on Linux,  database,  hardware,  security  and  web.  My  focus  is  to  write  arQcles  that  will  either  teach  you  or  help  you  resolve  a  problem. Read  more  about  Ramesh  Natarajan  and  the  blog. Support  Us Support  this  blog  by  purchasing  one  of  my  ebooks. Bash  101  Hacks  eBook Sed  and  Awk  101  Hacks  eBook Vim  101  Hacks  eBook Nagios  Core  3  eBook Contact  Us Email  Me  :  Use  this  Contact  Form  to  get  in  touch  me  with  your  comments,  quesQons  or  suggesQons  about  this  site.  You  can  also simply  drop  me  a  line  to  say  hello!. Follow  us  on  TwiZer Become  a  fan  on  Facebook     Copyright  ©  2008–2012  Ramesh  Natarajan.  All  rights  reserved  |  Terms  of  Service  |  AdverQse22  of  22 18  Apr  12  7:31  pm

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