Social media Analysis of Manchester City football club
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Social media Analysis of Manchester City football club

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Social media Analysis of Manchester City football club Social media Analysis of Manchester City football club Document Transcript

  • 3,580Table of Contents
  • Social Media Elective Dr. Jim HamillContents1. Executive Summary ....................................................................... iii2. Introduction ..................................................................................... 13. Analysis............................................................................................ 23.1. Internal Analysis ................................................................................................................................. 23.2. External Analysis ................................................................................................................................ 43.3. Strategy ................................................................................................................................................... 63.4. Key Performance Indicators ......................................................................................................... 73.5. People/Organisation/Resources................................................................................................. 84. Future of Social Media in Sports/Football Clubs ......................... 94.1. Future Social Media Initiatives .................................................................................................... 94.2. Future Disruptive Technologies .................................................................................................. 94.3. Enhanced Business Modelling ................................................................................................. 105. Recommendations ........................................................................115.1. MCFC Future Stars Initiative ..................................................................................................... 11 5.1.1. Design & Development ..............................................................................................................11 5.1.2. Promotion ...........................................................................................................................................11 5.1.3. Resources Required....................................................................................................................11 5.1.4. Timing ...................................................................................................................................................12 5.1.5. Existing Example ...........................................................................................................................12 5.1.6. Ethical Concerns............................................................................................................................135.2. Generic Recommendations ....................................................................................................... 13 5.2.1. Counteract Seasonality of Demand ...................................................................................13 5.2.2. Improve Community Engagement ......................................................................................13 5.2.3. Amplify Popular Social Community Initiatives .............................................................13 5.2.4. Monitor Competitor Social Media Activity.......................................................................14 5.2.5. Engaging with Future Prospective Fans .........................................................................146. Conclusion .....................................................................................167. Bibliography ..................................................................................171. Media Pack .....................................................................................191.1.Media Pack 1 ..................................................................................191.2.Media Pack 2 ..................................................................................201.3.Media Pack 3 ..................................................................................21Strathclyde MBA ii May/June 2012
  • Social Media Elective Dr. Jim Hamill1. Executive SummarySocial media in the last five years has changed the basic approach ofcommunication by both individuals and organizations. As per a McKinseyreport on “Demystifying social media”, 39% of the companies already considersocial media as a primary tool of interaction with customers, a figure that isexpected to rise to 47% in near future (Sarrazin, Edelman and Divol, 2012).It is therefor imperative that to provide relevant recommendations to enhanceMCFC organisational goals through social media, it is important to firstprovide an analysis of the scenario to date with an examination of the internaland external analysis; the key performance indicators employed andresources available. This analysis was undertaken by critiquing their:  Internal Analysis o Website  External Analysis o Youtube o Twitter o Facebook o FlickrFurthermore the identification and illustration of the importance of socialmedia KPI‟s is identified and linked to the development of a global fan base.Key to developing the recommendations is the consideration of the future ofsocial media in sports/football clubs. This has been done through three coreareas we identified:  Future Social Media Initiatives  Future Disruptive Technologies  Future Consumer Behaviour Points of ManipulationOne core recommendation was made with regards to the development of asocial media platform, named the Manchester City Future Stars Initiative,where future football players can be identified, whilst also allowingManchester City to promote the brand globally. Further genericrecommendations have resulted from our analysis, and merely seek toenhance the overall social media activities MCFC is currently undertaking.It is illustrated that MCFC is currently a dominant player in the football socialmedia market place, and it currently has the resources to maintain thisdominance. It is also noted that the evolving nature of the social medialandscape is always changing, and that caution should be exercised.Strathclyde MBA iii May/June 2012
  • Social Media Elective Dr. Jim Hamill2. IntroductionSocial media in the last five years has changed the basic approach ofcommunication by both individuals and organizations. As per a McKinseyreport on “Demystifying social media”, 39% of the companies already considersocial media as a primary tool of interaction with customers, a figure that isexpected to rise to 47% in near future (Sarrazin, Edelman and Divol, 2012).The following report considers the various social media contrivance availableand employed by Manchester City Football Club (MCFC). The report startswith the analysis of the company‟s current standing in the social mediasphere. The statement examines the internal mode of community interactionby scrutinizing the organizations core web page. The report also delves intothe various external forms of social media platforms used by MCFC in itscommunication and interaction with its end customer. The research tries toutilize some recognized tools of evaluation like 6 I‟s and balanced score cardin the process.The second part of the report focuses on the future prospects and trends ofthe social media and plausible evolution of the same.The report goes on to identify the gaps and opportunities by analyzing thecurrent strategy and the possible shift in social media means. This is thenfinalized with some recommendations for the future social media strategies ofMCFC with the potential benefits from the recommendations.Strathclyde MBA 1 May/June 2012
  • Social Media Elective Dr. Jim Hamill3. AnalysisTo provide relevant recommendations to enhance MCFC organisational goalsthrough social media, it is important to first provide an analysis of the scenarioto date with an examination of the internal and external analysis; the keyperformance indicators employed and resources available. 3.1. Internal AnalysisMCFC has a creative and innovative relationship with its online community.On an internal evaluation, their own website is used as a platform for othersocial media communities; focusing in Twitter, Facebook and blogs. Forexample, instead of promoting a chat developed in house for its owncommunity, they include in their website a column that represents the@MCFC Twitter account timeline. With this strategy they support the naturalevolution of communities while hosting their discussions themselves.The promotion of a customer-to-customer (C2C) relationship is the basis oftheir platform. Their “fan sites” segment in the website is dedicated to linkvisitors to the top 50 blogs already established. Another example is the sharebutton in which more than 450 different social networks or forums areincluded. These connections to other communities enhance its status as the„home’ page for current or even prospective fans seeking further interactionor C2C communication.In terms of social activity MCFC website includes several interactive sectionsthat distinguishes them from competitors. The best examples are the FanCam and the Fan Map. The former includes a 360° interactive image ofMCFC Etihad Stadium in which fans can „tag‟ themselves and share that totheir own communities. The latter is a map fed by fans in which is graphicallyexpressed the geographical distribution of fans around the globe. Both ofthese social media tools are pioneering efforts within in the sports industry.This allows MCFC fans to engage a proximal relationship with their fellow fansand offer them relevant data to develop strategies through identification ofpotential „influencers‟ amongst their involved fan base.A SWOT analysis (Diagram 1) has been conducted to offer a holisticperspective of the pros and cons involved in the strategic social mediadecisions.Strathclyde MBA 2 May/June 2012
  • Social Media Elective Dr. Jim Hamill Diagram 1 – SWOT Analysis of Social Media & MCFCMCFC harnesses their website as a platform for receiving feedback which isused as a guideline to shape their strategies. Their self-perception is closer toa global entertainment brand rather than a sport brand (Stoll, 2012). Hence,they focus not only on fans, but also customers and any person that could beemotionally moved by the brand. This strategy allows them to be exposed to agreater amount of people that is required to understand and satisfy. Forinstance, the “City Promise” is a section on their website that illustrates itspublic commitment to offer a great day in the stadium which is measured byan online survey.There were two areas of weakness that specifically can impede social mediawere identified:  The lack of languages. The website can only be displayed in English and Arabic. Manchester United‟s website by comparison offers seven languages including English, with a number focusing on developing Asian markets such as China.  The lack of specific access through mobile technology. While the only mobile version of the website can be found in a recently developed iPhone application. It was also noticed that the iPhone application has a cost of £3.00.Strathclyde MBA 3 May/June 2012
  • Social Media Elective Dr. Jim Hamill 3.2. External AnalysisTwitterFrom the analysis, it is evident that MCFC is highly active in the use of itstwitter account as a medium to interact with its fans. This can be seen fromthe fact that 26% of their tweets (Twtrland.com, 2012) are replies to fans. Thisis a high percentage when compared to Chelsea FC‟s 18% (Twtrland.com,2012). Chelsea, who are one of the leading clubs sporting teams associatedwith social media. On further analysis, it is seen that the replies are focused atthe key influencers among those associated to the club through social media.This well thought out strategy helps to improve the relationship of the clubwith these influencers as well as to cascade their campaigns and messagesto the fans through these mavens.They are also using Twitter in innovative ways such as the “Social MediaStadium” idea, in which in the Etihad Stadium screens all tweets including#BlueView hash tag. These are displayed through the halftime of thematches. This is an efficient method of connecting with users at the match,including those who are external to the stadium. This creates an overarchingsense of being part of the team and crowd, regardless of the members‟geographic location.FacebookAnother social media channel that the MCFC uses extensively is Facebook.The club however lags behind Manchester United in both numbers of fans aswell as the percentage of fan activity in the page (Facebook, 2012). Both theclubs use Facebook as a platform to broadcast messages and set titles fordiscussions but seldom participate further in these discussions.FlickrMCFC are one of the few clubs utilizing Flickr. The reasoning for this is the“fans can use photography and design to express their feelings about the cluband although it is more of a niche network, Flickr is regarded as the best andeasiest way for people to share their creative side online” (Stoll, 2012).YouTubeMCFC also has started to dabble in the use of video streaming on platformssuch as YouTube. A successful initiative has been the tunnel cam, wherebythe reactions of staff/players/security personal are recorded to give a„backstage‟ view to viewers (MCFC Youtube Channel, 2012).External PerspectiveFrom the external perspective, MCFC is not only widely present in most of thesocial media networks, but innovative and engaging with the fanbase. Theytry to embrace all types of fan insights; from direct comments or feedbackStrathclyde MBA 4 May/June 2012
  • Social Media Elective Dr. Jim Hamillreceived in Twitter, to the talented expression of feelings through photographsin Flickr. In each network they try to engage the audience, examples such asthe tunnel cam or the Social Media Stadium are highly effective to attachmore and more the fans to the club while attracting new fans as well.The presence in this wide amount of networks also enlarges the access totheir website; now Facebook is the third largest route to it (1. Direct Hits, 2.Google Searches) (McLaren, 2010).Strathclyde MBA 5 May/June 2012
  • Social Media Elective Dr. Jim Hamill 3.3. StrategyAccumulated from various sources (Stoll, 2012), (McLaren, 2010) it can besurmised that the strategy implemented for MCFC is based upon thefollowing:  To build and deliver social media platforms to customers which enhances C2C relationships in their own networks whilst ceding control and censorship  Regularly communication with fans and integration of their ideas  Give the feeling of involvement to the fans.  Involve fans in prototypes of initiatives, ensuring risk reduction  To provide the fans with additional and inclusive streams of communication direct to and from the club.  To provide additional, engaging and exclusive content to our fans on social media networks.  To build virtuous relationships with fan sites, blogs and forums that already exist online.Given these „means‟, the end goals or objectives could be:  Enhanced C2B communication for the development of new „focussed marketing initiatives‟.  Act as the guardian of the MCFC online presences  Develop marketing initiatives designed to promote to connected users and potentially altering consumer behaviour models.Additionally, it can be acknowledged that social media is utilized by a numberof internal stakeholders to the club such as players and employees. Thereforethe development of social media strategy required a usage policy from theclub, as acknowledged in an interview with Chris Nield, the Social Mediaemployee of MCFC: “Whilst we don’t discourage our players and staff from using social media sites and having personal profiles, we do have guidelines asking them not to disclose any sensitive information regarding themselves or other people at the club. The only sites we endorse are the club’s official presences” (McLaren, 2010).Overall, MCFC has seen its external indicators improved engaging longtimesupporters and attracting new fans with enough reasons to stay loyal(McLaren, 2010). Additionally, winning the Premier League Championship lastseason boosted the public interest to the club. With a well-establishedplatform and dedicated social media team accelerated the growth of a diversebase of fans while setting the ground to keep them in the future.Strathclyde MBA 6 May/June 2012
  • Social Media Elective Dr. Jim Hamill 3.4. Key Performance IndicatorsThe primary measure for social media is still the 3F‟s:  Friends  Fans  FollowersMCFC in their strategy has focussed on these factors in certain platforms andexcelled in some; especially Facebook as a channel. However, as Chris Nield,the Social Media Executive of MCFC stated; social media is not a numbergame but the ability of the organization to listen and interact with thecustomers who voice their opinions on these networks.While they still have considerable opinions being shared by their fans onTwitter, the response rate by the organization is not on par with competingteams engaged in Twitter, when compared to Chelsea. While it can be arguedthat the whole industry, including the most successful soccer club on socialmedia, Chelsea, is also similar, the fact remains that the objectives set byMCFC for itself in social networks is not being followed.According to MCFC, the way social media activities are measured is the rateof growth of members in their social networks (fans on the Facebook page,followers on Twitter and members of their Flickr group). Additionally theyfrequently review analytics, link tracking and exchanges using a range of toolsin order to gauge the real value of the increase in membership (Beusekom,2012). These tools, adapted for this report are:  Engagement Duration: With the engagement duration you make it clear how long a social media visitor is actively involved in the MCFC website.  Engagement Ratio: This ratio is determined by engagement. In the case of Facebook, the number of likes, comments and shares by mail on a given day divided by the number of fans on the page.  Response Ratio: The response ratio is calculated by the number of responses to your wall posts (with regard to Facebook) of the manager of a page divided by the total number of wall posts.  Activity Ratio: Last but not least you can analyze which visitors are the most active through an activity ratio. The activity ratio is the ratio between the activity of a certain user and the average activity of all visitors.The importance of understanding or setting KPI‟s allows the organizationgrowth goals for MCFC to be set. For example, monitoring of internationalengagement, response and activity ratios allows for MCFC to understand theireffectiveness in social media in recruiting new international fans, and as suchgrowing their fan base.Strathclyde MBA 7 May/June 2012
  • Social Media Elective Dr. Jim Hamill 3.5. People/Organisation/ResourcesMCFC has undergone a vast number of changes both on the field and off thefield since the buyout by the Abu Dhabi sovereign. It is evident that MCFC isbeing built as a global brand, and the funding to develop this is in place. Thisis evident from the rebranding of the organisation in 2008, and the overhaul ofits online presence in 2008/9. Additionally the appointment of Aaron Moore,who previously worked as a marketing executive for Tottenham Hotspur, asthe voice of the company in MCFC social media platforms indicates MCFCdedication to social media financially and through personnel.Since their vision is to be a platform for social communication, the mainresponsibilities of the social media team are related to internal roles. Theywant to include fans directly within the content of the sites rather than havingan omnipotent voice. However, it is still important to monitor and evaluate thetrend topics in the external platforms such as Facebook and Twitter in order toreact as soon as possible if necessary.Strathclyde MBA 8 May/June 2012
  • Social Media Elective Dr. Jim Hamill4. Future of Social Media in Sports/Football Clubs 4.1. Future Social Media InitiativesThe future opportunities for integrating MCFC marketing efforts with socialmedia are continuously advancing. This is evident as a focus of MCFC, asNield points out “there will be many more exciting advances in the pipelineover the coming seasons, I’m sure” and “For us it’s all about opening thedoors of the club to our supporters” (McLaren, 2010).Considering international sports teams and their integration into social mediaa Mashable graphic (Diagram 2). This illustrates how social media is startingto affect the buying behavior of sports fans and new platforms available toembrace this change. For example, Crowdseats.com is a new websiteassisting American sports teams. Fans can purchase their tickets online, at asizeable discount and are then expected to communicate their purchases totheir friends or co-fans to recommend a similar purchaseDiagram 2 – How Social Media is Changing Sport Ticketing (Laird, 2012) 4.2. Future Disruptive TechnologiesMCFC will also need to be open to changes in technology or advancinghardware. Named as disruptive innovations or technology disruptors, theseadvances are seen as being able to radically alter the way organisationsinteract with their customers, for example tripadvisor.com or the iPod.Furthermore, a recent technological advancement that could alter MCFC fanrelationships is Google Glasses. Instead of watching a television broadcast ofa game, imagine watching it via streaming video and picking your vantageStrathclyde MBA 9 May/June 2012
  • Social Media Elective Dr. Jim Hamillpoint from traditional wide-angle shots to feed delivered via camera glassesworn by different players (Laird, 2012). 4.3. Enhanced Business ModellingIt is also critical for MCFC to either develop their own social media practices,through standard operating procedures or external consultants specialising inSocial Media. With software and hardware rapidly changing, being able tostay ahead of the „game‟ is becoming more difficult. An example of externalconsultant‟s efforts is that of McKinsey below in Diagram 3, this illustrates thedifferent touch points from which an organisation can manipulate a person‟ssocial media experience without causing a negative backlash due to„community feel disruption‟.Diagram 3 – B2C Social Media Touch Points (Sarrazin, Edelman and Divol, 2012)The model clearly illustrates that the role an organisation can play inenhancing sales through social media is that of: Monitoring, Responding,Amplifying & Leading.Strathclyde MBA 10 May/June 2012
  • Social Media Elective Dr. Jim Hamill5. RecommendationsWhilst through the analysis it has been identified that MCFC has an aboveaverage social media campaign when benchmarked against its competitors, anumber of improvements can be made to enhance the organisations objectiveof increasing its global fanbase. 5.1. MCFC Future Stars InitiativeThe first recommendation is a new initiative for MCFC and is named“Manchester City Future Stars” (MCFS). MCFS will act as a platform wherefans around the world can upload videos of young talented football players.These „future stars‟ will be voted on by the general public and users of the sitewith the top selected chosen given a prize of training at a MCFC youthAcademy as illustrated in Media Pack One. 5.1.1. Design & DevelopmentThe design and development of the website would mirror that of the simplistic„hot or not‟ video platform. Whereby once on the website, two videos areplayed simultaneously and the user has to select one as his/her favourite. Thewebsite would also appear as a link or window within the main MCFChomepage as illustrated in Media Pack Two. 5.1.2. PromotionThe promotion of the MCFS initiative will require a boost to have the  Teaser campaign  Initial „street‟ football videos, notably existing viral stars.  Targeted Facebook Campaign  Have MCFC players tweet their favourite videos  (Need to insert which platform prospective fans will use)  Push initial PR in target countries  Build stronger PR through viral videos 5.1.3. Resources RequiredThe additional resources required for the initiative can be split into threecategories:  Time Resource: The initiative can be targeted for a single year, and then re-launched if defined as successful a year later.  People Resource: Presuming the staffing of the development of the website is outsourced; the website will require two full time staff members. These personnel can be classified as community managerStrathclyde MBA 11 May/June 2012
  • Social Media Elective Dr. Jim Hamill and assistant manager. They will have the responsibility to monitor and administer the website. Additionally, their responsibilities will include the promotion of the website online through amplifying potentially viral videos through social media platforms.  Financial Resource: The MCFS initiative will cost approximately £150,000.00 to develop and launch. See media pack three for a detailed cost breakdown. 5.1.4. TimingIt is our recommendation to time the launch of the MCFS one month after theend of the premier league season. This would counteract the seasonality ofsocial media user activity. It is clearly evident from diagram 4 below that thereis significant seasonality between the football season and off-season. As suchthis represents an opportunity to launch a viral campaign to spreadawareness of the club both in England and globally.Diagram 4 – ‘Manchester City’ Search Volume Index (Google Trends,2012) 5.1.5. Existing ExampleThe development of a social media campaign aimed at promotinginternational C2C communication can be achieved through employingconcepts such as the „My Starbucks Idea‟ whereby a platform is created togenerate topical interest on the organisation. The benefits as received fromStarbucks are:  Increased C2C communication  Operational/Service Feedback  Consumer driven initiatives  Enhanced brand value  Brand promotionStrathclyde MBA 12 May/June 2012
  • Social Media Elective Dr. Jim Hamill 5.1.6. Ethical ConcernsThe ethical concern of the uploading of media related to minors existingwithout their permission, and as such videos can be uploaded through a 3 rdparty site such as YouTube. Additionally a terms and conditions should beenforced which governs the legal rights of minors. 5.2. Generic Recommendations 5.2.1. Counteract Seasonality of DemandFrom our analysis it is noted that there is a lull period in the buzz about theclub during the end of season game and start of the transfer window. The clubcan take efforts to reduce this lull through innovative ideas beyond the MCFSinitiative. This includes embracing and promoting relevant „gossip‟ about thetransfers, new offers on merchandise, insights into the lives of the keymembers of the club etc. 5.2.2. Improve Community EngagementThe club could improve the level of engagement with fans on its Facebookpage through consistent interactions in the discussion to keep the „buzz‟going. 5.2.3. Amplify Popular Social Community InitiativesThe club can look for opportunities to promote its victorious moments throughsocial media and increase the sale of its merchandise thus boosting itsrevenue. Our study shows that the most popular picture associated with theclub in recent history was one where the football pitch was engulfed by theblue colour of the fans of the club (see Diagram 5)Strathclyde MBA 13 May/June 2012
  • Social Media Elective Dr. Jim Hamill Diagram 5 - @MCFC’s Highest ReTweet – (Twiiter.com)This image could have been used in a number of way on social media, suchas tagging, such as „where‟s wally‟? concepts. It is important for MCFC tomonitor the consumer driven social media communications such as this one,and as the McKinsey study suggests: Amplify its message (Sarrazin, Edelmanand Divol, 2012). 5.2.4. Monitor Competitor Social Media ActivityMCFC can broaden their perspective into continental Europe and that of otherfootball clubs in the world. For example, the club could emulate the Marseillethat outsourced the design of its jerseys to the Facebook fans (Lai, N/D). 5.2.5. Engaging with Future Prospective FansWhilst Facebook is the globally dominant social media platform with close toone billion users, only 60 million of these are under the age of 17 (seediagram 6 below). There are additional alternatives such as:  Club Penguin with over 30 million user accounts.  Fantage with over 16 million registered users.  Franktown Rocks 12 million registered users.  Facebook which still has a gigantic population.Strathclyde MBA 14 May/June 2012
  • Social Media Elective Dr. Jim HamillDiagram 6 - Facebook & LinkedIn Demographics (Young Upstarts, 2012)It is imperative to engage within social media channels at a potential fansyoung age, due to the increasing competitive market for global fan creationwhere teams are not only competing against other teams, but other sportsindustries.Strathclyde MBA 15 May/June 2012
  • Social Media Elective Dr. Jim Hamill6. ConclusionIn conclusion it has been illustrated that MCFC is currently a dominant playerin the football social media market place, and it currently has the resources tomaintain this dominance. It is also noted that the evolving nature of the socialmedia landscape is always changing, and that caution should be exercised.We have furthered the recommendations by adding in concerns for the futurewhich include technological innovations, changing consumer behaviour andnew social media platforms.Strathclyde MBA 16 May/June 2012
  • Social Media Elective Dr. Jim Hamill7. Bibliography  Beusekom, I.V. (2012) 4 KPI’s to Measure Your Social Media Success, 25 May, [Online], Available: http://www.business2community.com/social-media/4-kpis-to-measure- your-social-media-success-0184830 [12 Jun 2012].  Google Trends (2012) Google Trends - Manchester City, [Online], Available: http://www.google.com/trends/?q=premier+league&ctab=0&geo=all&da te=ytd&sort=0 [20 Jun 2012].  Lai, J. (N/D) Marseille Football Club outsource their Jersey design, [Online], Available: http://iamjohnlai.com/blog/?p=366 [14 Jun 2012].  Laird, S. (2012) Could Google Glass Change Pro Sports Forever?, 27 Jun, [Online], Available: http://mashable.com/2012/06/27/google-glass- pro-sports/ [27 Jun 2012].  Laird, S. (2012) How Social Media is Changing Sport Ticketing, 04 Jun, [Online], Available: http://mashable.com/2012/06/04/social-media- sports-tickets-infographic/ [13 Jun 2012].  MCFC Youtube Channel (2012) Tunnel Cam, 16 May, [Online], Available: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=LnxnPl8 A4rY#t=929s [14 Jun 2012].  McLaren, D. (2010) Interview: Why Manchester City Get Social Media, 10 Feb, [Online], Available: http://www.theuksportsnetwork.com/245 [28 May 2012].  Sarrazin, H., Edelman, D. and Divol, R. (2012) Demistifying Social Media, April, [Online], Available: http://www.mckinseyquarterly.com/Demystifying_social_media_2958 [15 Jun 2012].  Stoll, B. (2012) Interview with the man behind Manchester City’s Social Media, 31 Mar, [Online], Available: http://digital- football.com/featured/interview-with-the-man-behind-manchester-citys- social-media/ [29 May 2012].  Twtrland.com (2012) Twtrland.com, 15 Jun, [Online], Available: (http://twtrland.com/profile/@mcfc) [15 Jun 2012].  Twtrland.com (2012) Twtrland.com, 15 Jun, [Online], Available: http://twtrland.com/profile/@chelseafc [15 Jun 2012].Strathclyde MBA 17 May/June 2012
  • Social Media Elective Dr. Jim Hamill  Young Upstarts (2012) Compelling reasons to spend less time on Facebook and more time on LinkedIn, 07 May, [Online], Available: http://www.youngupstarts.com/2012/05/07/20-compelling-reasons-to- spend-less-time-on-facebook-and-more-time-on-linkedin/ [17 Jun 2012].Strathclyde MBA 18 May/June 2012
  • Social Media Elective Dr. Jim Hamill1. Media Pack 1.1. Media Pack 1Illustration of the voting system, in which randomly two young players aredisplayed so fans can choose the one more liked. The platform alsoemphasises the country from which the video was uploaded as well as theoverall statistics of the young player.Fans can navigate through the site searching for different players all aroundthe world and clicking a “Like” button linked with Facebook.Strathclyde MBA 19 May/June 2012
  • Social Media Elective Dr. Jim Hamill 1.2. Media Pack 2Illustration of the MCFC homepage, in which a link or window to the“Manchester City Future Stars” platform appears.Strathclyde MBA 20 May/June 2012
  • Social Media Elective Dr. Jim Hamill 1.3. Media Pack 3Assumed cost breakdown for Manchester City Future Stars Initiative. Furthercosting required providing a thorough detailed analysis.Item £Website Development £30,000.00Staffing (2x Employees) £50,000.00Publicity & Promotion £40,000.00Initial Videos £15,000.00Contingency £15,000.00Total £150,000.00Strathclyde MBA 21 May/June 2012