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Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program
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Making the Case for New Media in Your Communications Program

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    • 1. Making the Case for New Media In Your Communications Program Matt Howard Renee Basick
    • 2. Introductions <ul><li>Matt Howard </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Director, Chicago Media Initiatives Group, University of Chicago </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Background in academic publishing, online learning, web production, blogging, podcasting </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Renee Basick </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Senior Producer, Chicago Media Initiatives Group </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Background in broadcast and new media journalism; design, web development, video production </li></ul></ul><ul><li>CMIG </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Initiative of our Provost’s Office </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Consult on new media and communications strategy </li></ul></ul>
    • 3. Overview <ul><li>The Communications Divide in Higher Ed </li></ul><ul><li>Exploiting Web 2.0 for Communications </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Blogs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>RSS Feeds </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Podcasts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Social Media </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>HTML Email </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Integrating New Media in Communications Plans </li></ul>
    • 4. I. The Communications Divide
    • 5. The Communications Divide <ul><li>How do students communicate today? </li></ul><ul><li>“ Social Media” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Facebook, MySpace, LinkedIn </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Blogs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Instant messaging </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mobile device / text messaging </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>YouTube, Ziddio </li></ul></ul>
    • 6. The Communications Divide <ul><li>YET </li></ul><ul><li>< 8% of higher ed marketers use such innovative channels to reach prospective students </li></ul><ul><li>e-mail remains medium of choice </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(despite the fact students ignore them) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Survey* of 120 higher education marketers: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>95% use e-mail marketing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>62% use it to target alumni </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>< 50% use e-marketing to reach current students, faculty community, etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>*recent survey by marketing firm Media Logic Inc. </li></ul>
    • 7. The Communications Divide
    • 8. The Communications Divide
    • 9. II. Exploiting Web 2.0 for Communications
    • 10. What Is Web 2.0? <ul><li>Web 2.0* refers to a perceived second-generation of Web-based services that emphasize online collaboration and sharing among users . </li></ul><ul><ul><li>social networking sites (Facebook, MySpace, LinkedIn) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Wikis (Wikipedia) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>communication tools (blogs, podcasts, YouTube, Ziddio) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Folksonomies (tag clouds) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>*Adapted from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia </li></ul></ul>
    • 11. Blogs <ul><li>What is a blog? </li></ul><ul><li>How big is blogging? </li></ul><ul><li>Blogging in Higher Education </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Case Study: Law School Faculty Blog </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Updating your blog </li></ul><ul><li>Blog functionality </li></ul>
    • 12. What Is a Blog? <ul><li>A blog (short for Web Log) is a user-generated Web journal </li></ul><ul><li>Blogs provide commentary on a particular subject </li></ul><ul><li>Blogging services, such as TypePad and WordPress, use a WYSIWYG platform so you do not need to code </li></ul><ul><li>A typical blog combines text, images, and links </li></ul><ul><li>Readers can add comments </li></ul><ul><li>The network of blogs is called the Blogosphere </li></ul><ul><li>In November 2006, blog search engine Technorati was tracking more than 57 million blogs. </li></ul>
    • 13. How Big is Blogging? <ul><li>39% of American adults (57 million) are blog readers (July 2006) </li></ul><ul><li>11 million people (1 out of every 17 Americans) have created a blog </li></ul><ul><li>Every 7.4 seconds a new blog is created </li></ul><ul><ul><li>*From “Building Your Business with Video Blogging” April 2007, Event DV magazine </li></ul></ul>
    • 14. Blogging in Higher Ed <ul><li>Admissions blogs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Informational, give taste of University </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ex: MIT Admissions Blog </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.mitadmissions.org/ </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Academic / public intellectual </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ex: Becker-Posner Blog </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.becker-posner-blog.com / </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Campus blogs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ex: UChiBlogo </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http://uchiblogo.uchicago.edu </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Alumni blogs </li></ul><ul><li>Course blogs </li></ul><ul><li>Student blogs </li></ul>
    • 15. Case Study: Law School Blog <ul><li>started in 10/1/05 </li></ul><ul><li>academic content </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Op Ed </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Current ideas </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Academic draft of article </li></ul></ul><ul><li>First law faculty to collectively blog </li></ul><ul><li>Audiences </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Prospective students </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Students, faculty, staff </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Legal academy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>General public </li></ul></ul>
    • 16. Case Study: Law School Faculty Blog
    • 17. Case Study: Law School Blog <ul><li>Cost: $150 per year </li></ul><ul><li>Benefits </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Branding / raising profile </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Self-selection for prospective students </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Commentary on works in progress </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Visits </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Total ...................... 426,968 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Average per Day ................ 667 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Average Visit Length .......... 1:28 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Current Week .................... 4,671 </li></ul></ul>
    • 18. Case Study: Law School Blog
    • 19. Updating Your Blog
    • 20. Updating Your Blog
    • 21. Updating Your Blog
    • 22. Blog Functionality <ul><li>Post scheduling </li></ul><ul><li>Edit templates </li></ul><ul><li>Categories </li></ul><ul><li>Multiple authors </li></ul><ul><li>Photo galleries </li></ul><ul><li>Image uploading </li></ul><ul><li>File uploading </li></ul><ul><li>Comments </li></ul><ul><li>Pings </li></ul><ul><li>Trackbacks </li></ul><ul><li>Search </li></ul><ul><li>Blogroll/Lists </li></ul><ul><li>Moblogging </li></ul><ul><li>Social Bookmarks </li></ul><ul><li>Widgets </li></ul><ul><li>RSS / Atom </li></ul>
    • 23. Widgets <ul><li>a portable snippet of code, from a third party, that can be added any web page by an end user without requiring additional compilation </li></ul><ul><li>Common examples include: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Search box </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Online poll </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Calendar </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Subscriptions </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Adds functionality to your blog </li></ul>
    • 24.  
    • 25. RSS Feeds <ul><li>What is RSS? </li></ul><ul><li>Who Produces RSS Feeds? </li></ul><ul><li>User Benefits </li></ul><ul><li>RSS Feed Services </li></ul><ul><li>Content and Technical Issues </li></ul><ul><li>Distribution Issues </li></ul>
    • 26. What is RSS? <ul><li>RSS is Really Simple Syndication </li></ul><ul><li>RSS is an XML-based format for content distribution. </li></ul><ul><li>Many news organizations and blogs offer RSS feeds for use in news aggregators, often called &quot; feed readers .&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>Browsers such as FireFox, IE7, Safari allow for subscribing to feeds </li></ul><ul><li>Feeds typically include headlines, summaries, and links back to the original article online. </li></ul>
    • 27. Who Produces RSS Feeds? <ul><li>Major media organizations </li></ul><ul><li>University news offices </li></ul><ul><li>Bloggers </li></ul>
    • 28. User Benefits <ul><li>News content is &quot;pulled&quot; to the subscriber, as opposed to &quot;pushed&quot; out. </li></ul><ul><li>Automatically checks for and retrieves new content at user-determined intervals. </li></ul><ul><li>Eliminates user need to regularly check websites of interest for updates. </li></ul><ul><li>User has control (e.g., can subscribe or unsubscribe) </li></ul>
    • 29.  
    • 30. RSS Feed Services <ul><li>FeedforAll.com </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Helps you create and manage feeds </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>create RSS feeds & podcasts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>edit RSS feeds & podcasts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>manage and publish RSS feeds </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>create iTunes compatible podcasts </li></ul></ul><ul><li>FeedBurner.com </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Adds desirable functionality to your feed, such as integration with “social bookmarks” and “email this” ability </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provides “click through” statistics, number of subscribers, and your reach </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Inexpensive at $5 per month </li></ul></ul>
    • 31.  
    • 32. Content and Technical Issues <ul><li>Consistency of University brand </li></ul><ul><li>Managing headlines </li></ul><ul><li>Publishing issues </li></ul><ul><li>Copyright information </li></ul><ul><li>Contact information </li></ul><ul><li>Standardization of formats (RSS 1.0, 2.0, ATOM) </li></ul><ul><li>Standardization of iconography </li></ul><ul><li>Software available to create RSS </li></ul>
    • 33. Distribution Issues <ul><li>Internal </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Central University location for organizing campus feeds and podcasts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Example: http://feeds.uchicago.edu </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Add metadata in html to enable “live bookmarks” </li></ul></ul><ul><li><head> </li></ul><ul><li><meta http-equiv=&quot;Content-Type&quot; content=&quot;text/html; charset=iso-8859-1&quot; /> </li></ul><ul><li><title>University of Chicago News Feed</title> </li></ul><ul><li><link rel=&quot;alternate&quot; type=&quot;application/rss+xml&quot; title=&quot;University of Chicago News Feed&quot; href=&quot; http://www-news.uchicago.edu/rss/index.xml &quot;> </li></ul><ul><li></head> </li></ul><ul><li>External </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Consistency of University brand </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Submissions to RSS directories </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Moreover </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Syndic8 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Technorati </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Feedster </li></ul></ul></ul>
    • 34. Podcasts <ul><li>What Is a Podcast? </li></ul><ul><li>Podcasting in Higher Ed </li></ul><ul><li>Creating a Podcast / Vodcast </li></ul><ul><li>Setting Up Your Podcast </li></ul><ul><li>RSS 2.0 Media Enclosures </li></ul><ul><li>User Benefits </li></ul><ul><li>Content Issues </li></ul><ul><li>Distribution Issues </li></ul><ul><li>Value for Your College </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Case Study: CHIASMOS </li></ul></ul>
    • 35. What Is a Podcast? <ul><li>An RSS feed that includes direct links (called “enclosures”) to audio and video files. </li></ul><ul><li>Uses RSS subscription model to distribute audio and video programs via the Internet, playable on computers or handheld devices (iPod, mp3 player) </li></ul><ul><li>Video podcasts are often called vodcasts. </li></ul><ul><li>iTunes is podcast enabled, technology leader </li></ul><ul><li>Examples: http://feeds.uchicago.edu </li></ul>
    • 36. Podcasting in Higher Ed <ul><li>Course Delivery </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Recordings of class discussions / lectures </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Language (e.g., French) practice </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Storytelling and Public Relations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Faculty interviews, university news </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Public events / lectures in a series </li></ul><ul><li>Conference/Symposium Resources </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Recordings from a symposium </li></ul></ul>
    • 37. User Benefits <ul><li>Users who subscribe to a podcast are able to listen or view the content using free audio / video software--such as iTunes as well as through many feed readers. </li></ul><ul><li>As new content is made available, software automatically </li></ul><ul><ul><li>downloads new content to your computer </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ synchs” to mobile MP3 and video players, such as the video iPod. </li></ul></ul>
    • 38.  
    • 39. Content Issues <ul><li>Consistency of University brand </li></ul><ul><li>Managing headlines </li></ul><ul><li>Publishing issues </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fixity of errors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Enclosing media files </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Copyright information </li></ul><ul><li>Contact information </li></ul>
    • 40. Distribution Issues <ul><li>Internal </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Central University location for organizing campus feeds </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>(e.g., http:// feeds.uchicago.edu ) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Links to RSS subscription page (e.g., in copyright footer) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>External </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Consistency of University brand </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Submissions to RSS directories, such as: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Podcast Directory </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Podcast Alley </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Odeo </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>iPodder </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Podcast Pickle </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Yahoo! </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>iTunes </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Video iPod </li></ul></ul>
    • 41.  
    • 42.  
    • 43.  
    • 44. Value for Your College <ul><li>Questions for your college to consider: </li></ul><ul><li>Is there value in creating standards-and-use protocols? </li></ul><ul><li>Is there value in a centralized location for RSS and podcast feeds? </li></ul><ul><li>Is there value in creating (or investing in) a more robust feed generator? </li></ul>
    • 45. Case Study: CHIASMOS <ul><li>2003, Center for International Studies (CIS) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>began audio recording lectures </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>other area studies centers followed </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>CAN TV (public access) occasionally recorded events for broadcast, also providing audio and video files for the Web </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Spring / Summer 2006 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Volume of recordings created opportunity for outreach </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Outreach mandated by the Centers’ Title VI grants from the U.S. Department of Education. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>CIS communications / outreach staff made plan for CHIASMOS </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Asked CMIG to provide recording and postproduction services (10-15 events per quarter) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Fall 2006 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Names </li></ul></ul>
    • 46. Case Study: Chiasmos
    • 47. Case Study: Chiasmos
    • 48. Case Study: CHIASMOS <ul><li>World Beyond the Headlines </li></ul><ul><ul><li>launched on iTunes January 2006 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Began tracking subscriptions via FeedBurner July 28, 2006 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Averaged between 200-300 subscribers until late November 2006, when it was featured as one Wired ’s five favorite higher ed podcasts; subscriptions grew to over 1000 by January 2007. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Now 1690 subscribers, 281 reach </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>88,013 downloads of 32 enclosures since July 18, 2006 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>CHIASMOS audio (master podcast of all audio files archived on CHIASMOS) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>149 Subscribers, 28 reach </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>15,129 downloads of 111 enclosures since September 27, 2006 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>CHIASMOS video (master podcast of all video files archived on CHIASMOS) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>35 subscribers, 9 reach </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2,731 downloads of 49 enclosures since September 27, 2006 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Human Rights Distinguished Lecturer Series (Sponsored by Human Rights Program) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>284 subscribers, 41 reach </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>5,035 downloads of 14 enclosures since July 19, 2006 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Latin American Briefing Series (sponsored by Center for Latin American Studies) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>517 subscribers, 77 reach </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>12,298 downloads of 34 enclosures since July 19, 2006 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Total downloads via podcast since July 18, 2006: 123,206 </li></ul>
    • 49. Case Study: CHIASMOS <ul><li>Project Costs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>contracting with CMIG for their services, at between $185 - $250 (depending upon the complexity of editing, etc.) per event </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>estimate the total cost of recording and post-production at approximately $5k through the first two quarters of the project </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>additional costs include approximately 7.5 hours per week of CIS staff time for the construction and maintenance of the CHIASMOS website and podcasts (approx $14k annually) </li></ul></ul>
    • 50. Social Media: MySpace <ul><li>124 million profiles in 2.5 years (10/06)* </li></ul><ul><li>Web pages that serve as </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Diary </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>E-mail program </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Photo album </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Content shared with friends (whose pictures appear) </li></ul><ul><li>* From Washington Post “In Teen’s Web World, MySpace Is So Last Year” </li></ul>
    • 51. Social Media: MySpace
    • 52. Social Media: MySpace
    • 53. Social Media: Facebook
    • 54. Social Media: Facebook <ul><li>7.5 Million users </li></ul><ul><li>2100 colleges </li></ul><ul><li>22,000 high schools </li></ul><ul><li>1000+ companies </li></ul><ul><li>90+% utilization* </li></ul><ul><li>Does Facebook own your campus? </li></ul><ul><li>*From study at University of NC </li></ul>
    • 55. Social Media: YouTube <ul><li>YouTube (GoogleVideo) now offers college pages </li></ul><ul><li>Videos vary in topic, student and college produced </li></ul><ul><li>Ziddio also has a “Facebook Diaries” program that integrates with Facebook </li></ul>
    • 56. Social Media: YouTube
    • 57. Social Media: YouTube
    • 58. HTML Email <ul><li>Strategic Communications </li></ul><ul><li>Identifying Unmet Needs </li></ul><ul><li>Creating Your HTML Email Campaign </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Case Study: Participate Campaign </li></ul></ul>
    • 59. Strategic Communication <ul><li>Use email campaigns as a means to change behavior </li></ul><ul><ul><li>E.g., to give back to the University, to drive traffic to a Web offering </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Use wisely (and not too often) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>How often do you (and your staff) communicate with this constituent group? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Track the success of your campaign </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Click throughs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Gifts </li></ul></ul>
    • 60. Creating Your HTML Email Campaign <ul><li>Don’t do it yourself; use an industry vendor </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Vertical Response </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Topica </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Both Vertical Response and Topica can work with your data </li></ul><ul><li>Provides tracking </li></ul><ul><li>Offers personalized print campaign collateral (e.g., postcards) </li></ul><ul><li>HTML campaign can include other types of new media </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Audio and Video files, links to blogs, slideshows, etc. </li></ul></ul>
    • 61.  
    • 62.  
    • 63. III. Integrating New Media in Communications Plans
    • 64. Integrating New Media in Communications Plans <ul><li>Understanding your stakeholders </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Identifying unmet communications needs </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Understanding your organization </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What is your communications mix? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Target and position </li></ul><ul><li>Communication process and vehicles </li></ul><ul><li>Recommendations </li></ul>
    • 65. Understanding your stakeholders <ul><li>Identify primary and secondary stakeholders </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Alumni, donors, prospective students, current students, parents, community </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Journalists; local, state, federal government; industry, prospective faculty </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Demographics and psychographics </li></ul><ul><ul><li>location, socio-economic variables, lifestyles, media use patterns, behaviors, benefits sought </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Develop profiles </li></ul>
    • 66. Identifying unmet needs <ul><li>How well do stakeholders feel needs are being met? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Annual survey of random samples from constituents to identify strengths and weaknesses in your communications mix; track progress </li></ul></ul><ul><li>How well coordinated are you in communicating to stakeholders to achieve organizational goals? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Infrastructure (centralized, decentralized), success measures, consistency across communication channels (look and feel) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>How do you currently reach stakeholders? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Face to face, print, email, audio/video (DVDs, Web video) </li></ul></ul>
    • 67.  
    • 68. Understanding your organization <ul><li>“ Brand” value and perception </li></ul><ul><li>What is your mission? </li></ul><ul><li>Who do we serve? What benefits do we provide? </li></ul><ul><li>Sources of competitive advantage </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Core competencies of the organization </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Physical assets, intangible assets, capabilities, human capital </li></ul></ul><ul><li>SWOT Analysis </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Internal: Strengths Weaknesses </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>External: Opportunities Threats </li></ul></ul>
    • 69. SWOT Analysis of CMIG
    • 70. Target and position <ul><li>Perceptual Mapping </li></ul><ul><li>How do stakeholders perceive you? </li></ul><ul><li>How do stakeholders perceive your competitors? </li></ul><ul><li>Differentiation: Where do you want to be? </li></ul>
    • 71. Creating Your Message <ul><li>Message flows from </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Target and Position </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Desire to change your position </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>SWOT Analysis </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Strengths, Opportunities </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Survey Data </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What resonates with your constituents? </li></ul></ul></ul>
    • 72. Case Study: Participate Campaign <ul><li>Development Office campaign for young alumni </li></ul><ul><ul><li>FY06 received under $4M primarily through phone </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Instituted print, email, and new media (video) “Participate” campaign based on profiles of young alumni </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>By March 2007 already reached 85% of target $6M </li></ul></ul>
    • 73. Case Study: Participate Campaign
    • 74. Case Study: Participate Campaign <ul><li>November 2006, aggressive email campaign to young alumni </li></ul><ul><li>Giving in November increased </li></ul>
    • 75. Communication Process & Vehicle Selection <ul><li>Awareness </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Press releases, Web site </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Credibility </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Faculty press mentions, quotes, rankings </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Interest </li></ul><ul><ul><li>White papers, press articles, conference presentations, advertising, blogs, event recordings </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Preference </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Information sheets, collateral, brochures, promotional videos, podcasts, blogs </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Selection </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Maintenance communications, RSS feeds, podcasts </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Loyalty </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Thank you emails , regular mail, phone </li></ul></ul>
    • 76. What is your communication mix? How do you currently communicate / interact? Are these communications “strategic”? Are they aligned to user needs?
    • 77. Budget, Staffing, Schedule <ul><li>Budget </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Investment not a cost </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Specific costs of types of projects </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Invoicing: Freshbooks.com </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Staffing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Need one dedicated production professional (senior producer, producer, assistant producer) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Interns, students </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Schedule </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Calendaring system: Oracle, Google Calendar </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>FreedBack.com, Wafoo.com (web form apps) </li></ul></ul>
    • 78. Recommendations <ul><li>Establish task force of communicators / leaders for each stakeholder </li></ul><ul><li>Establish list of key messages, broken out by stakeholder group </li></ul><ul><li>Develop standard survey of stakeholders needs </li></ul><ul><li>Include measurement in every communication plan </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on the value of behavioral changes that can result from successful communication </li></ul>
    • 79. Thanks! <ul><li>Matt Howard </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>773-702-5071 </li></ul><ul><li>Renee Basick </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>773-834-7955 </li></ul><ul><li>http://cmig.uchicago.edu </li></ul><ul><li>http://research.uchicago.edu/highlights </li></ul>

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